Chiitan Black Lives Matter
Photo: twitter.com/chiitan7407

Japanese mascot Chiitan supports Black Lives Matter in this video

Susaki's unofficial otter mascot delivers a video message on the recent protests

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Written by
Kasey Furutani
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For the last week, peaceful protests and demonstrations have been happening worldwide to support the Black Lives Matter movement, a global organisation fighting against systemic anti-black racism. Started in the United States with the call for justice for George Floyd and other individuals who lost their lives to police brutality, the movement has since spread across the world. There were even peaceful marches in Osaka and Shibuya last weekend. 

Countless celebrities have voiced their opinion on the movement and now, a Japanese mascot has offered her support. Chiitan, the unofficial otter mascot of Susaki in Kochi Prefecture who gained international fame for her hilarious stunt videos, released a statement on the worldwide protests and Black Lives Matter movement on June 5. 

In the video, Chiitan laments the loss of George Floyd and discusses racial unrest in the United States and throughout the world. ‘It’s not good to evaluate people based on their skin color,’ the subtitles say as Chiitan bangs a baseball bat against a wall. ‘Everyone has the right to live freely and equally.’ At the end of the video, Chiitan donates USD100 (¥10,948) to the Black Lives Matter movement and tells the bereaved families ‘Chiitan and Japan are your friends!’. 

Learn more about the Black Lives Matter Tokyo chapter. Self isolating? Here is how to be an ally wherever you are in the world.

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