Get us in your inbox

Kasey Furutani

Kasey Furutani

Originally from Los Angeles, Kasey now considers herself something of a Tokyoite. She enjoys a good lemon sour, reading in light-filled cafés, and discovering new eateries around the city. Follow her on Instagram @kaseyfurutani_.

Articles (54)

17 best Japanese products and gadgets you need in your life

17 best Japanese products and gadgets you need in your life

Japan is chock-full of inimitable and wacky products ranging from the fun but not-so-practical novelty trinkets to the inventive and useful solutions for everyday living. If you're on the hunt for life-changing kitchen appliances and beautiful yet functional homeware, you've come to the right place. Corny keychains and snow globes these are not – here are some products that make great Japanese souvenirs.  RECOMMENDED: 10 things you didn't know were invented in Japan

23 of the most beautiful places in Japan

23 of the most beautiful places in Japan

It’s no secret that Japan has a stunning amount of beauty. From the lavender fields of Furano in Hokkaido down to the crystal clear beaches of Okinawa, this small country is filled with gorgeous nature, contemporary museums, mountainside temples and of course, those pretty cherry blossoms in spring. Now that Japan has reopened for international tourism, it's time for you to start putting this list into action. Recommended: The most beautiful festivals in Japan 

New Year's Eve in Tokyo 2022: how to celebrate

New Year's Eve in Tokyo 2022: how to celebrate

While New Year’s Day in Japan, called shogatsu, is normally a quiet holiday dedicated to family time, New Year's Eve in Tokyo is anything but. So spend Saturday December 31 2022 like a Tokyoite by heading to a countdown party, sipping creamy amazake at a temple, and getting up early to catch the first sunrise of the new year. Here's to an amazing 2023! RECOMMENDED: New Year's Eve train schedules across Tokyo

7 popular types of ramen and where to eat them in Tokyo

7 popular types of ramen and where to eat them in Tokyo

Noodle novices and experts alike have faced the dilemma of what to order at the ramen shop. Ramen refuses to be categorised neatly. Generally, ramen can be classified by soup (or flavouring; tare), or noodle type or region – you can see why it gets confusing. Everything is jumbled together to create one of Japan’s best dishes.  The four main types are tonkotsu, miso, shoyu and shio, but there are other popular options, too. You’ll also see combinations of these; for example, miso ramen and tonkotsu, a pork bone broth, are sometimes mixed. Specific types of noodles accompany different soups, so you won't find curly noodles everywhere. Most ramen dishes are also associated with their region – you’ll find meaty shoyu ramen in Yokohama whereas Hokkaido is famous for serving hearty miso ramen (with corn!).  This might warp your brain a bit, but remember, the best part of ramen is that there are no strict rules. For all its Michelin stars and global fame, ramen is still the fun and experimental sibling of traditional Japanese noodles such as udon or soba.  This guide breaks down all the classic ramen flavors, and where to eat them in Tokyo. Now go ahead and indulge in that hot bowl of comfort. You deserve it. RECOMMENDED: The best cheap eats in Tokyo under ¥1,200

The Ghibli lover’s guide to Tokyo

The Ghibli lover’s guide to Tokyo

What was your first introduction to Japan? Was it the kawaii culture of Hello Kitty or the ever-evolving Pokémon? For many, the wholesome films of Studio Ghibli were the magical doors inviting Totoro, Kiki and other famous figures of Japanese culture into children’s minds across the world. Chase after your childhood nostalgia in Japan, where your whole itinerary can revolve around the elusive animation studio. You’ll find bits and pieces of Ghibli’s influence all around Tokyo. You might not encounter a giant tanuki or travel in a floating castle, but Tokyo has plenty to offer for the die-hard Studio Ghibli fan – from the inspirations behind popular films like ‘Spirited Away’ and ‘My Neighbor Totoro’ to authentic souvenir shopping.  RECOMMENDED: Everything you should know about Ghibli Park, including how to get tickets

Where to see teamLab art for free in Tokyo

Where to see teamLab art for free in Tokyo

Tsukiji outer market, Sensoji Temple and Shibuya Crossing are probably already on your Tokyo to-do list – but don’t forget about teamLab. While the art collective showcases its works all over the world, it's also got some must-see exhibitions in Tokyo including the massive teamLab Planets museum in Toyosu. Unfortunately, we bid farewell to teamLab Borderless in Odaiba this August, but it has plans to reopen in central Tokyo in 2023. Need a bit more convincing before shelling out ¥3,200 for the museum entry? You’re in luck – Tokyo is also home to plenty of free public art created by teamLab. Here’s where to find these hidden teamLab pieces, from a ritzy Ginza department store to Tokyo Skytree.  Discover more teamLab art in Osaka, Okayama and Kyushu. RECOMMENDED: The best outdoor art museums and parks in Japan

33 of the best free things to do in Tokyo

33 of the best free things to do in Tokyo

By some measures, Tokyo is one of the world's most expensive cities to live in, but you don't have to take out a loan to have a good time. From free views of the city skyline to cheap Michelin meals, hanging out in the big city doesn't have to cost you anything. That's right: you can enjoy Tokyo's best art, music and entertainment without spending a single yen. So put your wallet away and follow our guide to the finest free attractions Tokyo has to offer, from local concerts to galleries featuring up-and-coming and established artists. And once you start feeling peckish, consult our cheap eats guide for the best grub under ¥1,000. Going out on a budget has never been this fun.  RECOMMENDED: For stunning free views, check out the best places to see the sunset in Tokyo

Tokyo Q&A: What is Japan's Golden Week?

Tokyo Q&A: What is Japan's Golden Week?

Golden Week is a big deal in Japan. Started in 1948, Golden Week is one of the longest holiday seasons in the country. During this time, the perfect spring weather usually calls for travel and outdoor fun. Spelled in katakana, the script used for English loan words, the name 'Golden Week' was coined in 1951 after the phrase ‘golden time’, which was widely used by the Japanese radio industry to refer to primetime listening hours. With so many holidays clustered together in Golden Week, a larger-than-usual number of people tuned in to the radio, attended movie theatres and spent money on leisure activities. Starting at the end of April and finishing in the first week of May, Golden Week consists of four national holidays which sometimes line up with the weekend when luck is on our side. This year, the holidays start on Friday April 29 and then we'll get three days off from Tuesday May 3 and ending on Thursday May 5. Golden Week is usually the busiest travel season, with many city dwellers travelling internationally and domestic tourists returning home on packed bullet trains and buses. However, with border restrictions still in place, this year's Golden Week will definitely be more subdued, and if you're spending the long weekend in the city, we have the guide for you.  Here are the four holidays that make up Golden Week.  RECOMMENDED: How to spend Golden Week in Tokyo this year

14 best day trips for a weekend getaway from Tokyo

14 best day trips for a weekend getaway from Tokyo

It’s true that Tokyo really does have everything, from the best restaurants in the world to endless shopping and even lush forest within the city limits. It’s way too easy to spend a whole vacation in the heart of central Tokyo; however, Japan has much more to offer than just its capital city. Get out of Shibuya and Ueno for a day (or longer, if you have time) and head south to Kanagawa hot springs, north to Tochigi for traditional shrines, or out to Yamanashi for postcard perfect views of Mt Fuji. Tokyo might have captured your heart, but these day trips will fully cement your love of Japan.   RECOMMENDED: The best glamping getaways near Tokyo

10 most beautiful bookstores and libraries in Japan

10 most beautiful bookstores and libraries in Japan

Japan is a book lovers’ paradise. Home to internationally renowned authors such as Haruki Murakami and Banana Yoshimoto, Japan has plenty to offer both on the page and on the streets. Whether you’re in Tokyo’s book town, Jimbocho, or one of the manga cafés dotting the country, you’re never far away from some quality reading material.  But it’s not just about the words themselves – every bookworm knows the importance of having a perfect place to read and Japan knows it, too. From rural Shikoku to urban Tokyo and Osaka, these bookstores and libraries combine Japan’s love of architecture and literature. RECOMMENDED: Marvel at some of the most beautiful places in Japan

ジブリ好きのための東京ガイド

ジブリ好きのための東京ガイド

タイムアウト東京 > Things To Do > ジブリ好きのための東京ガイド 日本の文化を海外に伝えてきたアニメといえば何が思いつくだろう? ハローキティのカワイイ文化、それとも進化し続けるポケモン? 多くの人にとって、スタジオジブリ作品に登場するキャラクターは、日本文化を子どもたちの心の中に招き入れる、魔法の扉だったのではないだろうか。 そんな「ジブリ」に関連するスポットは、パズルのピースのように東京のあちこちにちりばめられいる。巨大なタヌキに遭遇したり、天空の城を探検したり、といったことはできないが、「千と千尋の神隠し」や「となりのトトロ」など、人気映画にインスピレーションを与えた名所や公式ショップなどファンにとってたまらないスポットが数多くある。 関連記事『日本で行きたい「千と千尋の神隠し」モデルスポット6選』『武雄温泉でしかできない8のこと』

Where to see the Tokyo skyline for free

Where to see the Tokyo skyline for free

Famously photogenic and filled with national landmarks both modern and natural, the Tokyo cityscape is not to be missed. What was originally a city of canals is now a bustling metropolis, from Tokyo Bay and the outskirts of Chiba in the east to the rolling mountains of Okutama in the west. Take advantage of summer’s sunny days and get an incredible bird’s eye views of Tokyo from these observation decks and viewpoints – all completely free. RECOMMENDED: The best nature escapes in Tokyo

Listings and reviews (1)

Japanese Soba Noodles Tsuta

Japanese Soba Noodles Tsuta

In 2015, Japanese Soba Noodles Tsuta shocked the culinary world when it received a Michelin star – the first ramen shop to do so. A couple of things have changed since that fateful day: the shop moved from its humble roots in traditional Sugamo, known for its old-school aesthetic and elderly population, to trendy Yoyogi-Uehara, an upscale neighbourhood where you’ll find boulangeries side-by-side with boutiques. Second, in 2020, Tsuta lost the Michelin star that turned its ramen into a household name.  Tsuta was, and still is, innovative in its ramen game. In a land of curly noodles swimming in heavy, pork-based broths, Tsuta’s bowls are surprisingly light and complex. Rather than using usual ramen ingredients, Chef Yuki Onishi incorporates ingredients from all over the world inspired by his favourite dishes, ramen or not.   Soy sauce ramen (¥1,300) is the signature bowl here and, even at its most basic, it packs a punch. You’ll immediately smell the truffle oil wafting off the umami-rich soup when the server brings the bowl to your table. Sure, you can splurge ¥3,550 for a bowl topped with shaved truffle, but, the simple truffle oil-topped soy sauce ramen is just enough without overpowering the other flavours. The pork, topped with a balsamic vinegar sauce, is melt-in-your-mouth tender; plus, the sauce gives the chicken, clam and seafood-based broth a slightly tart aftertaste – a delightful contrast to the truffle’s richness.  Another winner is the salt ramen (¥1,300). Unlike

News (305)

Ninjas and geisha explain Japanese etiquette in these Responsible Traveler videos

Ninjas and geisha explain Japanese etiquette in these Responsible Traveler videos

Initially released ahead of the Tokyo 2020 Games, the Japan National Tourism Organisation released ten videos in English, Chinese and Korean, explaining the unwritten rules of Japanese manners and etiquette to the unaccustomed visitor. These short and sweet and entertaining videos star samurai, sumo wrestlers, ninjas and geisha to explain common travel topics like photography, tipping in a restaurant and visiting a temple or shrine.  It's now the perfect time to revisit these videos as Japan gears up to reopen to the world on Tuesday October 11. In autumn 2019, Kyoto placed a ¥10,000 fine for photography of geisha and private alleyways in the historic Gion. The World Heritage city also launched a smartphone update informing tourists of respectful behaviour. This video touches upon photography etiquette and teaches tourists to only take photos when the subject consents to it.  Bathing in an onsen or sento is a distinctly Japanese experience, but it can be intimidating for those not used to bathing in public. This video explains the basics of public bathing etiquette, such as not placing your towel in the bath (hint: place it on top of your head). Nothing is worse than feeling confused without any clothes on, so read our onsen etiquette guide for a more detailed explanation of public bathing.   Okay, we’re all guilty of letting a friend

Foreign residents can use the JR Tokyo Wide Pass to travel around Kanto

Foreign residents can use the JR Tokyo Wide Pass to travel around Kanto

There have been plenty of transportation deals for Japan residents over the last couple years, including discounts on bullet train rides across the country. If you’re thinking of sticking close to Tokyo, the great-value JR Tokyo Wide Pass gives you unlimited rides on shinkansen and limited express trains in the Kanto region, so you could go as far as Nikko, Mt Fuji or even Izu.   Available to those with a foreign (ie, non-Japanese) passport – including tourists and foreign residents – this pass lets you ride bullet trains and limited expresses as much as you want over three consecutive days.  Here are the train lines covered by the pass: JR East lines Tokyo Monorail Izu Kyuko Line Fujikyu Railway Lines ​​Joshin Dentetsu Line Saitama New Urban Transit (Ōmiya - the Railway Museum)​ ​ Tokyo Waterfront Area Rapid Transit Line (Rinkai Line)​ ​ Nikko, Kinugawa, and SPACIA Kinugawa trains (only between JR East and Tobu Railway lines) Tobu Railway lines between Shimo-imaichi and Tōbu-Nikkō / Kinugawa-onsen (ordinary and rapid trains). However, between Kurihashi and Shimo-imaichi, you can only use Tobu Railway express trains.See the website for the full list as well as the terms and conditions. Need some trip inspo? If you’re heading north, hit up the picturesque Hitachi Seaside Park in Ibaraki, go for a dip in an onsen in Nikko or taste some juicy gyoza in dumpling-loving Utsunomiya. For something a bit more iconic, head inland to the resort town of Karuizawa or to Yamanshi’s Lake

チームラボが佐賀県の大自然を舞台にした展覧会を今年も開催

チームラボが佐賀県の大自然を舞台にした展覧会を今年も開催

日本国内だけでなく、世界的な活躍を続けるチームラボのアートイベントが各地で開催されている。チームラボボーダレスが、2022年8月31日(水)で閉館してしまうのは悲しいことだが、原宿で開催中の「捕まえて集める神秘の森」や、夜の植物公園を舞台にした「チームラボ ボタニカルガーデン 大阪」などの注目イベントが盛りだくさんだ。 「チームラボ かみさまがすまう森」は、チームラボが佐賀県の妙高高原にある御船山楽園を舞台に毎年開催しているアートイベント。開催8回目となる今年も、50万平方メートルの広大な敷地内に息づく大自然と、最新のデジタルテクノロジーを駆使したデジタルアートの融合が楽しめる。 自然とその精神性に焦点を当てた同展は、チームラボが進める「Digitized Nature」というプロジェクトの一貫。非物質的であるデジタルアートによって「自然が自然のままアートになる」というコンセプトのもと、自然と人とのつながりと境界のない時間の連続性を表現する。 見どころは、敷地内に鎮座する巨石を使ったインスタレーション作品「かみさまの御前なる岩に憑依する滝」や、池の水面にカラフルな魚たちを投影した「小舟と共に踊る鯉によって描かれる水面のドローイング」。また、今年は新作「生命は結晶化したうごめく光」も登場する。結晶化したような光がうごめき、中心から虹色に輝くという神秘的な作品で、作品に触れることも可能だ。 Photo: teamLab, 'Megaliths in the Bath House Ruins' ©teamLab 敷地内にある使われなくなった浴場を利用した「廃墟の湯屋にあるメガリス」も見逃せない。床に突き刺さった柱のようなディスプレーには、花や水のデジタルプロジェクションが投影されており、廃虚の浴場を神秘的な光で照らし出している。 御船山楽園ホテル また、御船山楽園を訪れたら「サウナシュラン」で3年連続グランプリを獲得した「御船山楽園ホテル らかんの湯」も訪れてみよう。総重量3トンにもなる巨大ストーブがある「薪(まき)サウナ」や、スタイリッシュなデザインが特徴の水風呂がある。 「チームラボ かみさまがすまう森」の開催期間は11月6日(日)まで。周辺には歴史的な温泉街、武雄温泉もあるので、併せてチェックしてみるといいだろう。 関連記事 『チームラボがアブダビに常設の没入型アートスペースをオープン』 『チームラボが夜の植物園でアート空間を演出』 『アーツ千代田 3331、2023年で契約満了』 『災いとしての呪物を福に転じる、「祝祭の呪物展」が日本橋で開催』 『創立150周年の東京国立博物館、5日間限定で総合文化展無料に』 東京の最新情報をタイムアウト東京のメールマガジンでチェックしよう。登録はこちら    

Watch this relaxing 8K aerial video on YouTube if you miss Japan

Watch this relaxing 8K aerial video on YouTube if you miss Japan

It’s been a while since international tourists were allowed entry into Japan. We know it's a long and frustrating wait, so we hope to satiate your wanderlust temporarily with this relaxing aerial video of spectacular scenery across Japan. For the time being, enjoy some armchair travel and keeping researching your dream trips. This 8K video from Armadas is the perfect tour through Japan from your living room. The one-hour video was filmed from 2018 to 2019, back when domestic and international tourists were still allowed to travel in Japan. Photo: Armadas/YouTubeIzu, Shizuoka The video starts off in the Izu Peninsula in Shizuoka prefecture, south of Tokyo. Izu is known for its bluffside hikes, abundant Kawazuzakura cherry blossoms in Minami-Izu, and the Izu-Misaki lighthouse. Next, we jet off to Yakushima, a small island off the coast of Kagoshima (1:12). A hiker’s paradise, Yakushima is filled with cedar trees, moss and waterfalls – a complete natural respite. You can even spot the Nagata Lighthouse at the 6:57 mark. Photo: Armadas/YouTubeKyoto Shortly after that, it’s on to Kyoto, which is arguably its most beautiful in autumn. The video shows one of the city’s serene temples surrounded by vermillion maple trees. After that, we travel north to Hakodate, in Hokkaido (11:35), known for Mt Hakodate and the curious star-shaped fort.  Photo: Armadas/YouTubeTokyo Skytree The next aerial view features our favourite city, Tokyo, readily identif

Fuji-Q Highland's 55m-tall observation deck has Mt Fuji views and a giant slide

Fuji-Q Highland's 55m-tall observation deck has Mt Fuji views and a giant slide

Japan has plenty of theme parks and roller coasters, from the new Super Nintendo World to the oddly-named Sagamiko Resort Pleasure Forest. However, the scariest park is still Fuji-Q Highland in Yamanashi. Known for its record-breaking, terrifying roller coasters, Fuji-Q makes for a great day trip from Tokyo, especially in winter when you’ll have clear views of a snow-capped Mt Fuji. Photo: Fujikyu Co. Ltd If you’re looking to get the views without the adrenaline rush, you’re in luck. As of last summer, Fuji-Q now has a 55m-tall observation deck right beside the theme park's scariest roller coaster. Because it's as tall as the rollercoaster's tallest point, the observation deck boasts the same grand view of Mt Fuji that you'd probably miss while screaming on the ride.  Photo: Fujikyu Highland Alongside its observation deck, the tower was unveiled with another attraction called the Fujiyama Walk: a course where you can traverse in a harness midair. Soon, however, the tower will be offering yet another feature in the form of a giant spiral slide. The mouth of the giant slide is built near the 55m mark and visitors will be able to slide on a tube all the way down to the bottom of the tower. The Fujiyama Slider is set to open sometime this summer, with details of prices and admission hours to be announced at a later date.  Photo: Fuji Kyuko Both Fujiyama Sky Deck and Fujiyama Walk cost ¥1,000 to ¥1,400 each, depending on the season. However, a one-day pass (¥6,200) will get

Watch this stunning short documentary about the origins of Japanese dashi – for free

Watch this stunning short documentary about the origins of Japanese dashi – for free

Umami is one of the most ubiquitous tastes in Japanese cuisine. You might not notice it at first, but after eating a lot of Japanese food, you’ll begin to taste the moreish, savory goodness. Dashi, a clear broth made from dried kombu and katsuobushi (fermented skipjack tuna) flakes, is the umami base for most Japanese meals, including miso soup, noodle dishes like ramen or udon and tamagoyaki.  Eric Wolfinger, a food photographer known for his work with the San Francisco bakery Tartine, introduces the world to dashi in the short film, ‘Dashi Journey’. The 15-minute documentary follows Shinobu Namae, head chef at the Michelin-starred French restaurant L'effervescence in Tokyo, as he searches for the origins of dashi. L’effervescence is known for its Japanese twist on classic French food, including the use of dashi in place of traditional French veal broth.  The surprisingly heartwarming film takes us to Rebun Island in Hokkaido for kombu, where we see how kelp is dried, and Makurazaki in Kagoshima, where we meet a family-run katsuobushi business. Dashi is a deceptively complex broth: using ingredients from the sea, it brings a distinctly Japanese taste to every meal it touches. Along with Namae, we are introduced to the people behind the umami-rich dashi, and the old-school practices still used today. The film, with English subtitles, is available to watch for free from anywhere on Vimeo or via the official website. In the mood for more mouth-watering films? Check out

You can now ride Japan’s most famous roller coasters online

You can now ride Japan’s most famous roller coasters online

Getting a little antsy from staying at home all day? Theme parks, including Yomiuriland, Tokyo Dome City and Yokohama’s Hakkeijima Sea Paradise, have uploaded free videos of their attractions – including bungee jumping, VR games and of course, roller coasters – so you can get your adrenaline rush from the comfort of your couch.  Here are some of the best, and scariest, rides.  Thunder Dolphin at Tokyo Dome City The adorably-named Thunder Dolphin is not for the faint of heart. The steel roller coaster starts with an 80-degree incline, where you’ll be rewarded with a gorgeous view of Tokyo, before the roller coaster reaches speeds of 130kmph, whipping through Tokyo Dome’s famous Big O. Roller Coaster at Hanayashiki  Located in Asakusa, Hanayashiki is Tokyo’s oldest amusement park, dating back to 1853. It is also home to Tokyo’s oldest roller coaster, which opened in 1953. The aptly named Roller Coaster might not be the most thrilling ride as it only reaches speeds up to 42kmph. But, if you crank up the sound, you’ll notice some scary creaking noises coming from the nearly 70-year-old coaster.  Bandit at Yomiuriland  Bandit, Yomiuriland’s classic roller coaster, is surprisingly long – the three-minute ride will whip you through the forests of western Tokyo, reaching speeds of 110kmph. Surf Coaster Leviathan at Hakkeijima Sea Paradise  Yokohama’s Surf Coaster Leviathan (at Hakkeijima Sea Paradise) is Japan’s only roller coaster that travels o

teamLab is transforming a Kyushu forest with digital art this summer

teamLab is transforming a Kyushu forest with digital art this summer

It seems like teamLab is everywhere these days, bringing some much-needed light and fun in the midst of this glum pandemic. The world-conquering art collective has all sorts of ongoing projects like this installation in a soy sauce storehouse, not to mention the digital art ramen restaurant inside Tokyo's teamLab Planets. For an outdoor option, the 500,000sqm Mifuneyama Rakuen Park in Kyushu’s Taeko Onsen town is hosting teamLab’s annual summer-autumn installation, ‘A Forest Where Gods Live’. The pieces of indoor and outdoor art meld Kyushu’s lush forest with teamLab’s signature lighting and projections.  Photo: Graffiti Nature - Living in the Ruins of a Bathhouse, Red List Nature and spirituality are a huge part of ‘A Forest Where Gods Live’, and the art respects and reflects humanity’s connection to the land. The 3,000-year-old Okusu tree sits on the grounds of Takeo Shrine on the edge of the park, while Mifuneyama Rakuen Hotel is on the other side, separated by the forest and teamLab art. ‘Life is Continuous Light - Azalea Valley’ and ‘Resonating Mt Mifuneyama’ bring the two sites to life with illuminations that shine and fade, highlighting the natural beauty of the forest.  Photo: teamLab Megaliths in the Bath House Ruins ‘Megaliths in Bath House Ruins’ is inspired by Mifuneyama Rakuen’s ancient boulders and bath houses. Digital projections of flowers or water move between slanted monolithic pillars, lighting up the abandoned b

teamLab now has a bathhouse and sauna with digital art in Roppongi

teamLab now has a bathhouse and sauna with digital art in Roppongi

Art collective teamLab has always got something exciting up its sleeve, whether it’s an immersive exhibition in the heart of a forest or a digital art vegan ramen restaurant. This Tokyo pop-up, teamLab Reconnect, is yet another brilliant example of how teamLab works to incorporate digital art into everyday life with a visually stunning sauna experience. The exhibition consists of three areas designed to invigorate your senses: the sauna area, a cold bathing area for cooling off and the art submersion area for resting. The artworks are all based around the theme of supernatural phenomena and are designed to combine different mental and physical sensations into a single unified experience. Photo: teamLab'Levitation' Installations that you’ll come across include ‘Levitation’, which uses teamLab’s signature style of art that responds to the viewer’s physical presence. When approached or touched, the glowing ball will fall and move around, but when left alone, it will rise back into its original position. Photo: teamLab'Ephemeral Solidified Light' Meanwhile, ‘Proliferating Immense Life - A Whole Year per Year’ (pictured top) is a grove of digital flowers blooming and growing before your eyes. When approached, the flowers will wilt and die, beginning a cycle of constant renewal. This installation changes with the seasons and is set to feature autumn-inspired visuals from October 18. Photo: teamLab'Step into the Light Circle' In the cold bathing area, you can ste

The 2021 Sado Island Earth Celebration will stream its taiko drum shows online

The 2021 Sado Island Earth Celebration will stream its taiko drum shows online

Off the coast of Niigata lies Sado Island, one of the best off-the-beaten-path destinations in Japan. The island is locally famous for its distinctive taraibune tub boats, dramatic coastlines and its annual festival, Earth Celebration. Held every summer, Earth Celebration is a taiko drumming music festival that attracts domestic and international tourists to the island. Although Covid-19 has cancelled festivals throughout Tokyo and Japan, Earth Celebration has decided to take a different approach, streaming the festival online for everyone to watch. Hosted by the taiko group Kodo, the two-day online festival will feature taiko drumming performances highlighting Sado Island’s distinctive culture. The first show will take place on August 21 at 4pm JST and will begin with a pre-concert talk and introduction to Earth Celebration and Kodo's activities. The Harbour Concert will then start at 5pm followed up by a post-concert interview with three taiko drumming stars. The second concert will take place on August 22 at 4pm JST and will also begin with a pre-concert talk before the Kodo all-star special performance. The concert will be followed up by more interviews as well as a pre-recorded farewell video.  Photo: Earth Celebration Committee Live-stream tickets are ¥2,500 for one concert, but you can also purchase a ticket for both concerts for ¥4,000. If you miss the performance, don't worry. The archived recordings will be available immediately after the live-strea

札幌のホテルがラーメン屋そっくりな客室を提供

札幌のホテルがラーメン屋そっくりな客室を提供

日本屈指のグルメで知られている北海道。新鮮な魚介類、濃厚なアイスクリーム、そしてラーメンは地元の人たちにも観光客にも人気のフードだ。そんな北海道のラーメンファンのために誕生した、ユニークなホテル客室が第2弾のコラボレーション企画を始めた。 Photo: Sapporo Tokyu REI Hotel   札幌のナイトライフエリア、すすきの中心部に位置する札幌東急REIホテルでは、ラーメンをテーマにした特別な客室『山岡家部屋』に期間限定で泊まることができる。 この客室は、札幌をルーツとするとんこつベースのラーメンで有名なチェーン、ラーメン山岡家とのコラボレーションによって生まれた。ベッドサイドや壁にはメニューの看板やのれんがあり、まるでラーメン屋で眠ってしまったかのような錯覚を覚えるだろう。 Photo: Sapporo Tokyu REI Hotel 宿泊の際には、ラーメン山岡家、極煮干し本舗、味噌ラーメン山岡家で使える「ラーメン一杯無料券」のほか、乾麺5種類セットが入った「山岡家 乾麺コンプリートボックス」や「山岡家オリジナル冷感マスク」「オリジナル宿泊証明書」が付いてくる。 月〜木曜の宿泊者には限定で「山岡家こだわりの海苔」のプレゼントも。「山岡家 乾麺コンプリートボックス」の箱は、組み立てると山岡家店舗を再現したペーパークラフトになっていて、子どもと工作するのも楽しそうだ。 予約と宿泊期間は、2021年9月13日(月)まで。1人利用は6,000円、2人利用の場合は1人当たり5,000円から泊まることができる。今すぐの遠出が難しい人は、阿寒湖の注目イベントや知床のサウナ情報をチェックしておこう。 『山岡家部屋』の詳細はこちら 関連記事 『アイヌ文化とモーメントファクトリーのコラボ、カムイルミナが北海道で開催』 『世界自然遺産の流氷を見渡すサウナが知床にリニューアルオープン』 『東京、昆布水つけ麺 15選』 『お台場の大江戸温泉物語で閉館前の夏イベントが開催中』 『都心から1時間半、湯河原に湯と本と食のリトリート施設が誕生』 東京の最新情報をタイムアウト東京のメールマガジンでチェックしよう。登録はこちら  

This ramen-themed hotel in Sapporo lets you slurp and sleep in the same place

This ramen-themed hotel in Sapporo lets you slurp and sleep in the same place

Hokkaido is known for its beautiful landscapes and incredible culinary scene. Both locals and tourists can indulge in Hokkaido’s fresh seafood, rich ice cream and, of course, piping hot bowls of ramen anytime of year. Now, noodle lovers can make sure their whole trip to Sapporo revolves around the humble soup noodle at these special ramen-themed rooms at Sapporo Tokyu REI Hotel, located in the heart of Susukino, Sapporo’s main nightlife district. Photo: Sapporo Tokyu REI Hotel A collaboration with Ramen Yamaokaya, a chain famous for its pork-based miso ramen with roots in Sapporo, these limited-time rooms are decked out with all the ramen necessities. The rooms are much more comfortable than falling asleep drunk in a ramen restaurant at 2am – although the detailed decor may have you thinking that’s what you’ve done when you first wake up. In the room there’s a photo of the restaurant counter next to the bed, in addition to Ramen Yamaokaya’s signature red sign and curtains, ready to spark some sodium-filled dreams. Plus, your room will smell like the restaurant, too, upon arrival with the complimentary ramen soup you’ll receive.   Photo: Sapporo Tokyu REI Hotel All this ramen paraphernalia will definitely have you craving some salty noods. Fret not: Ramen Yamaokaya will provide plenty of goodies to satisfy your porky midnight cravings. The hotel stay comes with a variety pack of Yamaokaya ramen in shio, shoyu, classic miso, special miso and spicy miso flavours, as well as

The best things in life are free.

Get our free newsletter – it’s great.

Loading animation
Déjà vu! We already have this email. Try another?

🙌 Awesome, you're subscribed!

Thanks for subscribing! Look out for your first newsletter in your inbox soon!