Demon Slayer train
Photo: kirin0825/YouTube

This Demon Slayer themed steam train is running for a limited time in Kyushu

Seats on the locomotive from the hit anime film are sold out, but you can still snag themed bento at Hakata Station

By
Tabea Greuner
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Japan’s latest blockbuster anime movie ‘Demon Slayer: Kimetsu no Yaiba the Movie: Infinity Train’, is so popular, it reached over ¥10 billion in box office sales in just nine days, beating records set by the Studio Ghibli classic ‘Spirited Away’ and the mega hit ‘Your Name’.

Unsurprisingly, you’ll find the characters gracing everything from pre-made curry and canned coffee to onigiri rice balls. But JR Kyushu has gone one step further, turning an old steam locomotive into the titular infinity train from the movie.

The old SL Hitoyoshi train from the Taisho era (1912-1926) – the same period Demon Slayer is set – has even been given a new front face, with kanji characters reading mugen, meaning ‘infinite’ in English.

Just like the movie itself, tickets were snapped up straightaway. Still, if you’re a superfan who couldn’t get a seat, you can still catch a glimpse of the train in action. Its maiden voyage was on November 3, and it will also run on November 15, 21 and 23, departing at 8.35am from Kumamoto Station and arriving at 1.04pm at Hakata Station in Fukuoka prefecture. Those lucky fans on board can buy exclusive merch, and if they dress up in period attire – think hakama or kimono – they’ll get a special prize.

Demon Slayer bento
Photo: Gotouge Koyoharu; Shueisha; Aniplex; Ufotable

If you’re passing by Hakata Station, be sure to pop in and pick up this Demon Slayer inspired ekiben (¥1,674), which is on sale at three bento shops inside the station until December 28. The bento features spicy cod roe on rice, Miyazaki beef, boiled sweet potato and mitarashi dango (rice dumplings in a sweet soy glaze).

Demon Slayer bento
Photo: Gotouge Koyoharu; Shueisha; Aniplex; Ufotable

With each purchase, you’ll get one of these Demon Slayer desk pads.


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