1. Tiffany Cafe
    Photo: Tiffany & Co.
  2. Beige Alain Ducasse
    Photo: Beige Alain Ducasse

6 best designer brand cafés and restaurants in Tokyo

Mixing food with fashion, these luxury spots are run by coveted labels like Chanel, Dior, Louis Vuitton and more

Emma Steen
Written by
Emma Steen
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Once a tactic to get shoppers to stay in stores for longer, designer café́s operated by luxury retailers have now evolved into destinations in their own right. Rather than offering just refreshments, luxury fashion brands are focused on creating an experience for people – and not just frequent shoppers. 

From collaborations with celebrity chefs to highly Instagrammable flagship stores, fashion houses like Louis Vuitton are becoming ever more ambitious in their efforts to entice us into stores at a time where (let’s be honest) most of us favour shopping online. If a good cappuccino and pretty bowls of pasta are more likely to catch your attention than a leather handbag, these ritzy designer cafés and restaurants might just be your gateway to the world of haute couture. 

RECOMMENDED: Not done window shopping? Visit these stunning flagship stores in Tokyo 

Puttin' on the ritz

  • Restaurants
  • French
  • Ginza
  • price 3 of 4

On the tenth floor of Chanel’s flagship boutique in Ginza is a restaurant that is every bit as fresh, elegant and sophisticated as the French fashion house itself, with a cream-coloured interior designed by Peter Marino. A collaboration between Chanel and Ducasse Paris, Beige has been dishing up contemporary French cuisine with Japanese flavours since 2004.

The restaurant is currently overseen by executive chef Kei Kojima and holds two Michelin stars. The lunch course, priced at ¥10,500 per person, comes with an amuse bouche, two entrees and a dessert, with the option of swapping the second entree for two glasses of wine selected by the sommelier.

Dinner is priced upwards of ¥16,000 per person, but think of it this way: you could eat here 100 times before the bill exceeds the price of some Chanel purses.

  • Restaurants
  • Harajuku

Fancy having breakfast at Tiffany’s? At this outpost on Cat Street, you can channel Audrey Hepburn’s iconic character as you tuck into pastries with a freshly brewed coffee. Croissants are a given, but the Tiffany Café also offers New York favourites like hot dogs, pretzels, cheesecake and even blue donuts if you really want to lean into the jewellery brand’s colour scheme. 

Grab something to go, or see if you can snag a spot at one of the Tiffany-blue booths for a leisurely pit stop while shopping in Harajuku. On your way out, take a peek at items exclusive to Cat Street – you’ll be surprised to find it’s not all about platinum pendants and diamond rings here. Among the more distinctive items are sporting goods like Tiffany basketballs, rugby balls and even skateboards.

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  • Restaurants
  • Italian
  • Ginza
  • price 4 of 4

Champagne, caviar and candlelit dinners? Yes, please. On top of its renowned restaurant, Bulgari’s Ginza flagship store boasts a Dom Perignon Champagne terrace as well as a bar for cocktails and afternoon tea to suit any hour of the day. Luca Fantin’s Italian restaurant, however, gets more attention than even the fine jewellery and accessories adorning the shop’s display cases.

The restaurant has proudly held a Michelin star since 2011 and even made the list of Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants in 2020, coming in at No. 17. There are two omakase courses available during lunchtime (¥11,550 or ¥18,150), while dinner is set at ¥20,350 for seven courses and ¥29,950 for nine courses.

  • Restaurants
  • Harajuku

Cashmere sweaters and coffee go hand in hand, so it makes sense that Ralph Lauren’s Omotesando flagship store should feature a New York-style café. Sitting here, it’s easy to feel like you’re brunching somewhere in Manhattan instead of the centre of Tokyo, what with the old-school ivy green interior and generous American-sized portions. 

Treat yourself to a slice of carrot cake with cream cheese icing or, if you’re feeling indulgent, a good old fashioned brownie (¥500) topped with a scoop of vanilla ice cream (an extra ¥600). As for the coffee, look out for barista specialities like cortado and flat white that you won’t find on the menu in most typical Japanese coffee shops. You'll also find branches of Ralph's at the Ralph Lauren stores in Ginza and Shinjuku. 

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  • Restaurants
  • Ginza

Dior’s previous café produced by Pierre Hermé sadly closed in spring of 2020, only to reopen as the Café Dior by Ladurée a few months later. Here, you can re-create that iconic montage from Sophia Coppola’s ‘Marie Antoinete’ by combining the hottest styles in French fashion with pastel coloured sweets.

The afternoon tea sets start at an eye-watering ¥18,000, but the a la carte options come with more palatable price tags. Get a moelleux au chocolat (molten chocolate cake) for ¥2,000 or a selection of macarons for ¥3,300, which includes flavours like bergamot and rose.

  • Shopping
  • Boutiques
  • Ginza

Louis Vuitton’s second flagship store in Tokyo on Namiki-dori draws plenty of visitors who simply want to ogle at the building’s iridescent exterior. But there’s even more to see inside the seven-storey structure, which recently reopened after a three-year renovation that saw the addition of a Louis Vuitton café (only the second in the world after its debut in Osaka).

Located on the top floor of the building, Le Café V offers a selection of seasonal sweet treats and savoury bites like Mont Blanc chestnut cakes (offered in autumn) and creamy crab croquettes (a wintertime speciality). Furnished with chairs and tables from the Louis Vuitton Objet Nomad Collection, the dining space, designed by Jun Aoki and Peter Marino, has a fresh yet classic feel to it.

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