London's best late-night restaurants

Where to grab a bite in the capital after hours

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© Rob Greig

Looking for somewhere you can have a pleasant, relaxed meal after 11pm - but want to avoid the late-night party venues where food is secondary to drinking? Here's our pick of places in the West End.

La Bodega Negra

  • Rated as: 4/5

The neon sign outside reads ‘sex shop’; the mannequin in the entrance wears a PVC gimp suit. But the real excitement begins when you descend the stairs into the bowels of this nightclub-like restaurant. It’s so dark and loud you’ll need a moment to adjust (the light bulbs have been blacked out). By comparison, the homely Mexican cooking can feel run-of-the-mill, though effort is put into

  1. 16 Moor Street, W1D 5NH
More info

Brasserie Zédel

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 2/4

Restaurateurs Chris Corbin and Jeremy King, creators of the Wolseley and the Delaunay, have struck gold with this grand art deco basement brasserie. It’s a huge set-up and attracts a mix of tourists, office types and couples. Affordable French staples are the big draw and set menus start at under a tenner for two courses. In the months after it opened, we’d been impressed by the quality of

Free live music every night in the Brasserie after 10pm.
  1. 20 Sherwood Street, W1F 7ED
Book online

The Delaunay

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Price band: 4/4

The Delaunay was Chris Corbin and Jeremy King’s 2012 follow-up to the Wolseley and, like that handsome behemoth, it looks like it’s been here for decades. Grand European cafés provide the inspiration, and the interior is a treat – a David Collins-designed mix of green leather banquette seating, dark wood, brass rails, antique mirrors and a black and white marble floor. The café and bar

  1. 55 Aldwych, WC2B 4BB
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Dishoom

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

A swish Bombay brasserie in the style of the old post-colonial 'Irani cafés' of Bombay, Dishoom is filled with retro design features: whirring ceiling fans, low-level lighting and walls adorned with vintage Indian magazine advertising. The look is certainly distinctive, but the effect can be so slick when compared to the real thing that the venue can feel rather soulless and corporate. This

  1. 12 Upper St Martin's Lane, WC2H 9FB
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Lahore Kebab House

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 1/4

It might not look like much, but Lahore Kebab House is a place of pilgrimage for curry lovers. Queues snake out of the door at weekends, with diners travelling from afar to sample Punjabi-style tandoori grilled meat and generous portions of ghee-laden curry. Bargain prices, attentive service and a BYO policy add to the draw. Piles of sweet onion bhajia and heavily spiced lamb chops might start

  1. 2-10 Umberston Street, E1 1PY
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Mamuska!

  • Rated as: 2/5
  • Price band: 1/4

A Polish ‘milk’ bar (‘bar mleczny’) seems ideally suited to the Elephant & Castle shopping centre. More transport caff than a haven of Polish home cooking, Mamuska! offers filling fare, fast and at bargain prices. Spacious, clean and family-friendly, it’s unsurprisingly popular with an eclectic clientele. Sadly, the food isn’t exactly homely. We weren’t looking for frills, and

  1. 1st floor, (Elephant & Castle Shopping Centre), SE1 6TE
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Mangal II

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 1/4

Variety is the spice of life, unless you’re artists Gilbert and George, who eat here every night and have done for years. We saw them arrive at 8pm, sit at their favourite table, and ask for exactly what they’d been eating every night for the past few weeks (our waiter revealed they do intermittently try something new). Perhaps the duo should check out some local alternatives, as Mangal II

  1. 4 Stoke Newington Road, N16 8BH
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Spuntino

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Price band: 2/4

For a lesson in how to make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear, head to Spuntino. A challenge to find (look for ‘number 61’), the venue is laid out as a bar – and a tiny one at that, with a smattering of fixed, backless seats allowing diners to perch along the counter. This is no wholesome 1950s-style diner, but a dark, grungy space where dim lights dangle in cages, the walls are cracked and

  1. 61 Rupert Street, W1D 7PW
More info

The Wolseley

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 3/4
  • Critics choice

A self-proclaimed ‘café-restaurant in the grand European tradition’, the Wolseley combines London heritage and Viennese grandeur. Its black, gold and cream colour scheme suggests prestige, and you might easily imagine the buzz of conversation and the chink of crockery to have reverberated around the high ceilings since the 1920s. Yet the venue is only a decade old. Nevertheless, it’s now

  1. 160 Piccadilly, W1J 9EB
Book online

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Users say

2 comments
David N
David N

i agree - ridiculous article


doesnt even have the obvious ones like duck and waffle or vingt quatre

Fiercehairdo
Fiercehairdo

Many of these restaurants actually close or stop serving at 11pm! Rendering the whole "late-night" theme of the article pointless. Expected more accurate info from Time Out. And you even specifically claim it is for people wanting to eat after 11. Useless.