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Restaurants in Soho, London

West End eats don't come better than these

Soho has a great range of restaurants to satisfy any culinary craving. If you want to try a traditional British restaurant, try Dean Street Townhouse. If you're more in the mood for authentic tapas, there's Barrafina, and for sumptuous spicy asian buns, try Bao. Read on for our recommendations for the best restaurants in Soho. Do you agree with the choices? Use the comments box below or tweet your suggestions.

The best restaurants in Soho

10 Greek Street

A small, unshowy restaurant that’s made a name for itself with a short but perfectly formed menu and an easy-going conviviality. Dishes are seasonal and it’s good value for money. Tables are closely packed and in the evening it can get noisy, but otherwise it’s hard to fault the place. Adept, friendly staff are a further plus. If you can’t handle the no-booking policy at dinner, bookings are accepted for lunch.

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Soho

Balls & Company

Specialising can sometimes be little more than a gimmick, a way of saying ‘look at me!’ to trend-chasing food groupies. Balls & Company is in a different league. This is a proper restaurant, with a highly skilled chef, that happens to specialise in meatballs. Or, more accurately, balls, as they’re not all meat. Chef-owner Bonny Porter was a finalist in Australian ‘MasterChef’ in 2012. So it’s probably not surprising that her take on meatballs is international in outlook. And there's an outstanding cocktail bar, Company Below, in the basement.

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Soho

Babaji

Alan Yau's Turkish pizza place is on two levels. Sit on the ground floor if you want pizza action, as the chefs lunge in and out of the the huge pizza oven with their wooden peels; head for the first floor if you’d like more space. near Piccadilly Circus. The excellent pizza would not be out of place in Istanbul, but Babaji also covers many Turkish signature dishes. For anyone making a night of it, there’s even a list of good Turkish wines. 

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Soho

Bao

Though based on Taiwanese street food dishes, the kitchen pushes far beyond those boundaries. The restaurant’s name derives from gua bao: fluffy white steamed buns, in this case filled with braised pork, sprinkled with peanut powder. Other sorts of bao (bun) are more slider-like. Yet buns are only half the story. Xiao chi (small eats) are given equal prominence, and the drinks list (sakés, artisanal ciders, well-matched beers, chilled foam tea and hot oolong teas) is distinguished. 

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Soho

Barrafina

Accept it: there will be a queue. Bookings aren’t taken and hopeful diners can expect to wait at least an hour, any evening of the week. Yet seldom does anyone leave Barrafina disappointed. The place is part restaurant, part theatre. Nibbles and drinks are served as you wait – service is excellent. The chefs, stars of their stage, shout out orders, grill, fry and plate up their creations. Barrafina’s menu is studded with Mallorcan and Catalan tapas dishes. And wines by the glass showcase some of Spain’s best modern winemaking.

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Soho

Bó Drake

Bó Drake calls itself an ‘East Asian barbecue restaurant’. It could also be called an American/Asian fusion restaurant, having elements in common with David Chang’s Momofuku group in New York and the Kogi ‘taco trucks’ (Mexican tacos, but with Korean-style meats) set up in Los Angeles by Seoul-born Roy Choi. While the Mexican connection is indisputable, the dominant palate at this no-reservations restaurant is Korean. And the flavours are splashed on with vigour. To eat here is to surf on wave after wave of umami flavours.

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Soho

Bocca di Lupo

The buzz is as important as the food at Jacob Kenedy and Victor Hugo’s enduringly popular restaurant. Dine at the bar and you’re in for a fun night, or afternoon – especially if you’re by the window. It’s the perfect perch from which to watch favourite actresses swan into the clamorous and less atmospheric rear dining room. The menu is a slightly confusing mix of small and large plates to share and, amid the noise, it can be unclear what you think you’ve ordered and at what point it might arrive. To drink, there’s an enticing selection of cocktails and an impressive all-Italian wine list.

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Soho

Brasserie Zédel

Venue says: Dine with us and enjoy live music! Our swinging house bands play six nights a week from 9.30pm (9pm on Sundays).

Restaurateurs Chris Corbin and Jeremy King, creators of the Wolseley and the Delaunay, have struck gold with this grand art deco basement brasserie. It’s a huge set-up and attracts a mix of tourists, office types and couples. Affordable French staples are the big draw and set menus start at under a tenner for two courses. There can be hits and misses, in cooking and service, but on the whole this is a good place when you want a touch of glamour without paying glamorous prices. The house wine, priced at bargain basement rates, provides great value. 

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Piccadilly Circus

Ceviche Soho

The Peruvian party hasn’t stopped on Frith Street since Ceviche showed up: Martin Morales’s restaurant-bar (and his joie de vivre) seems to have struck a chord with Londoners. Pisco cocktails alone are worth a visit, but the food is just as impressive. Obviously the star of the show is ceviche. Order with corn cakes, fresh and vibrant salads packed with avocado and lightly spiced chicken dishes and you’ll be feeling higher than a gap-year student on a Peruvian journey of self-discovery.

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Soho

Chotto Matte

If you're looking for a good time, head to Soho. No, not for anywhere lit by a red light, but for a night at Chotto Matte. This vast Frith Street newcomer takes Japanese-Peruvian fusion (or Nikkei) and really cranks up the volume. On the ground floor is an enormous bar, which on our visit was a seething mass of suits and glamourpusses, all drinking cocktails against a vivid manga-style mural; for the restaurant, go up a floor. 

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Soho
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By: Tania Ballantine

Comments

2 comments
Sarah Lewis
Sarah Lewis

We visited Mele e Pere in Brewer Street for lunch earlier in the week. Their lunch menu is great value at £8.50 for a main course that could include Braised short rib beef with chantenay carrots and crushed potatoes. Fantastic prices and worth a visit - the best Italian in Soho!

Lina Ho
Lina Ho

I was in London Chinatown there was a restaurant called 'THE CHEAPEST RESTAURANT IN TOWN" neon lightbox. Fantastic beef stir fried noodles serves daily always full house too! no tax, free tea. I really want to know if this is still there