Marylebone area guide

Explore the indie shops on Marylebone High Street, or discover a lovely restaurant in the heart of the city

© Paul Raeside
Marylebone has been an incredibly fashionable area in London since at least the seventeenth century  - as the catalogue of famous residents (past and present) attests. With Oxford Street as its southern border, Marylebone is of course a world-famous shopping destination, but a quick look around the side streets reveal specialist shops and boutiques that sell everything from Stradivarius violins to plastic buttons.
 
Like the shops, the best restaurants and cafés in Marylebone provide a range of products at a range of prices, and everything from a cup of tea to haute cuisine is executed with the same passion and expertise. Not to be outdone, the Marylebone bars and pubs are stylish places to relax with superb cocktails and outstanding ales after a long day.
 
What are your favourite Marylebone haunts? Let us know in the comments box.

Explore the area

Restaurants

Restaurants

Marylebone's restaurants cater for all tastes and budgets, but sometimes only the very best will do. Luckily our list of Marylebone favourites includes everything from no-booking burgers to no-trainers haute cuisine.

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Restaurants

Cheap eats

Wandering around the classy boutiques of Marylebone you may be forgiven for thinking that eating in the area is beyond your budget. You'd be wrong; here's our list of great cheap eats to be found in this genteel pocket of London.

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Things to do

Bars and pubs

Marylebone is ideal for a relaxing drink in gorgeous surroundings. Purl is styled like a New York speakeasy and has a drinks menu that reads like a chemistry experiment. Langham Hotel's bar, Artesian, takes its visual cues from Victorian bars, whilst its cocktails are second to none. Those looking for a straightforward pint will prefer The Temperance, which has a large selection of draught and bottled beers and wine.

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Shopping

Shops

It goes without saying that some of London's biggest shops are in Marylebone: Oxford Street is in the area, after all. But the best independent shops are away from the crushed mobs swarming around Topshop. Margaret Howell, for example, stocks the kind of well-made basics that will look as fashionable in 20 years as they do today. So does Gallery 1930, sort of: it specialises in antiques from the '30s. And Daunt Books is a cathedral to reading, complete with stained glass and oak railings.Have we missed a great spot for shopping in Marylebone? Let us know in the comment box below…

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Things to do around Marylebone

Museums

Sherlock Holmes Museum

The Sherlock Holmes Museum – founded in 1989 on a site approximating that described by Conan Doyle, though actually standing at number 239 – fought long and hard for the right to claim the address 221B Baker Street as its own. When you visit you are likely to be greeted by an august person wearing a bowler hat and whiskers; this, you will deduce, is Doctor Watson. 

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  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Attractions Buy tickets

Madame Tussauds

Streams of humanity jostle excitedly here for the chance to take pictures of each other planting a smacker on the waxen visage of fame and fortune. Madame Tussaud brought her show to London in 1802, 32 years after it was founded in Paris, and it’s been expanding ever since, on these very premises since 1884. 

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Music

Wigmore Hall

Built in 1901 as the display hall for the German company Bechstein Pianos, the Wigmore Hall was seized as enemy property in WWI and sold at auction for a fraction of its value. These days, boasting perfect acoustics, art nouveau decor and an excellent basement restaurant, the 'Wiggy' is one of the world's top chamber music venues and currently hosts around 400 events a year. 

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  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Attractions

Regent's Park

Regent's Park is one of London's most popular open spaces, covering 410 acres in north-west London. Originally a hunting ground for Henry VIII, it remained a royals-only retreat long after it was formally designed by John Nash in 1811; only in 1845 did it open to the public as a spectacular shared space. Attractions run from the animal odours and noises of London Zoo to the enchanting Open Air Theatre.

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  • 5 out of 5 stars
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