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Rosie Hewitson

Rosie Hewitson

Newsletter and Events Editor, Time Out London

Rosie Hewitson has been Time Out London’s Events Editor since November 2021, and has edited the London newsletter Out Here since its inception in June 2022.

She has written for the likes of VICE, Dazed, Refinery29, Huck Magazine, Clash, DIY, The Guardian, The Independent and British Vogue, and has also co-authored London Shopfronts with illustrator Joel Holland.

She moved to ‘That London’ from the northeast in 2013 and has since lived in approximately 20,000 houseshares around the city and drunk upwards of four million pints at Dalston Superstore. She mostly writes about queer stuff, football climate change, music, lifestyle trends and London...obviously. 

You can read some of her very old freelance pieces on her appallingly out of date website at www.rosiehewitson.com or catch her tweeting approximately twice a year @ro_hew.

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Articles (111)

Things to do in London this weekend

Things to do in London this weekend

Soon, you can breathe a sigh of relief. We're coming up to the very last weekend of February, the dreariest, longest-feeling (if technically pretty damn short) month in the whole calendar. But before you wave goodbye, its time to fill your precious spare time with some mood-lifting, spirit-brightening fun.  And London is full of ways to fill your life with culture. If you're lucky (and deep-pocketed) enough to bag a ticket, Sarah Snook is wowing audiences in The Picture of Dorian Gray. Or keep things affordable with the West End's biggest ticket sale, on all week. There's still time to check out some of the best new artists around at Bloomberg New Contemporaries. And don't miss out on the chance to feast on a pizza-based collab by two Time Out faves, Yard Sale and Roti King.  Still got gaps in your diary? Embrace the cold on a winter walk or shelter inside one of London’s cosiest pubs. If you’ve still got some gaps in your week, check out London’s best bars and restaurants, or take in one of these lesser-known London attractions. RECOMMENDED: listen and, most importantly, subscribe to Time Out’s brand new, weekly podcast ‘Love Thy Neighbourhood’ and hear famous Londoners show our editor Joe Mackertich around their favourite bits of London.

Things to do in London this week

Things to do in London this week

The end of winter is in sight, London! By the time this week is done, we’ll be less than a month away from the official beginning of spring, and the weather is already starting to get a little bit less disgusting. In the meantime though, there are plenty of big cultural treats to sink your teeth into this week. ‘Jerusalem’ playwright Jez Butterworth’s first play in seven years ‘The Hills of California’ has opened at the Harold Pinter Theatre with Sam Mendes in the director’s chair. The Hayward Gallery is playing about with form, structure and materials at its new exhibition ‘When Forms Come Alive: 60 Years of Restless Sculpture’. The Tate Modern’s big Yoko Ono exhibition has arrived, while Tate Britain’s one about John Singer Sargent and fashion opens this week. Plus, Tanztheater Wuppertal dancers are at Sadler’s Wells with a wonderfully bizarre ballet being performed in London for the first time since 2005.  Still got gaps in your diary? Embrace the cold on a winter walk or shelter inside one of London’s cosiest pubs. If you’ve still got some gaps in your week, check out London’s best bars and restaurants, or take in one of these lesser-known London attractions. RECOMMENDED: listen and, most importantly, subscribe to Time Out’s brand new, weekly podcast ‘Love Thy Neighbourhood’ and hear famous Londoners show our editor Joe Mackertich around their favourite bits of London.

The best camping in the United States

The best camping in the United States

Let's be real: life is chaotic. If you're looking for an escape from the demands of everyday life, there's no better activity than camping—especially in the US. Camping culture in America is big for a reason: we have some of the most beautiful and varied landscapes in the world, many of which have sites open to the public to reserve for overnight.  When booking your next adventure, choose from taking in views of the California coast, sleeping on an island with wild horses, or enjoying the magnificence of the Grand Canyon. Whether you're looking for a spot to pop up a simple tent or prefer more of a glamping experience, we've compiled the best camping spots in the USA for your next adventure. No matter your destination, breathe in the fresh air, feel the warmth of a rolling campfire, and get ready to find that sense of peace and calm you've been craving.

The 50 best podcasts to listen to in 2024

The 50 best podcasts to listen to in 2024

What did we do before podcasts? Who knows, because now they’re like a right arm to most of us, making journeys seem faster and chores less painful all over the globe. You know the drill. If there’s a market for it, there’s a podcast about it. But with the incredibly vast world of podcasts throwing up new options every day, how does anyone know where to begin? Well, that’s where we come in. We’ve rounded up our favourites, from political podcasts that look behind the news to comedy podcasts with your favourite funny people, and plenty of those all-important investigative whodunnits to keep you up at night. If you’re looking to dig deeper into one genre, we’d recommend trying our specialist lists on for size (you’ll find them below). But for a full list of good, addictive podcasts of every genre, read on.  RECOMMENDED:🎧 The best podcasts on Spotify😂 The best comedy podcasts 🗞️ The best news podcasts💤 The best sleep podcasts🎶 The best music podcasts

The top 25 museums in London

The top 25 museums in London

London is absolutely world class when it comes to museums. Obviously, we’re biased, but with more than 170 of them dotted about the capital – a huge chunk of which are free to visit – we think it’s fair to say that there’s nowhere else in the world that does museums better.  Want to explore the history of TfL? We’ve got a museum for that. Rather learn about advertising? We’ve got a museum for that too. History? Check. Science? Check. 1940s cinema memorabilia, grotesque eighteenth century surgical instruments, or perhaps a wall of 4,000 mouse skeletons? Check, check, check! Whether you’re teaming up with like-minded friends or going it alone, London’s museums are great places to spend a bit of time. Here are some of our absolute faves.  RECOMMENDED: 101 amazing things to do in LondonRECOMMENDED: the best Airbnbs in LondonRECOMMENDED: the best hotels in London This article includes affiliate links. These links have no influence on our editorial content. For more information, click here.

The best places in London to watch the Six Nations 2024

The best places in London to watch the Six Nations 2024

The Six Nations rugby tournament is back for 2024, taking over pubs, beer gardens and outdoor screens across London most weekends up until Saturday March 16.  Having won the tournament for a fifteenth time with a Grand Slam last time round, Ireland have gotten off to a great start defending their title, beating Italy and France in the first two rounds of fixtures, while England also remain unbeaten so far. There are loads of rugby pubs and bars all over London showing  matches, but if you’re looking for big screens and plenty of seats and atmos, check out our pick of the best places to watch all the rugger action in the capital.  

The best new restaurants in London

The best new restaurants in London

Every week, a frankly stupid amount of brilliant new restaurants, cafés and street food joints arrive in London. Which makes whittling down a shortlist of the best newbies a serious challenge. But here it is. The 18 very best new restaurants in the capital, ranked.  Go forth and eat, featuring everything from sublime small plates at Hackney's Sune, to modern Malaysian cuisine at Mambow in Clapton, sublime sausage at Bistro Freddie in Spitalfields to glitzy rotisserie chicken at Soho's Bebe Bob, Italian-ish snacks at Forza Wine on the South Bank, wondrous west African set menus at Chishuru in Fitzrovia, and Filipino sharing feasts at Donia in Soho.  Leonie Cooper is Time Out London’s Food and Drink Editor. For more about how we curate, see our editorial guidelines. RECOMMENDED: The 50 best restaurants in London.

Where to watch the London Marathon: the best places along the route

Where to watch the London Marathon: the best places along the route

Running 26.2 miles (twenty six point two!) dressed as Po from ‘Teletubbies’ is something that the majority of us Londoners will probably never be brave enough to attempt. Running a marathon is a truly gruelling feat requiring countless hours of training, so the 50,000 brave souls who are taking part London Marathon on Sunday April 21 2024 very much deserve our support.  Check out our route guide below to find the best spectating spots and track down nearby pubs and bars for when all that whooping and clapping leaves you feeling nearly as thirsty as the runners. Remember: your presence at this monumental sporting occasion makes it absolutely fine to drink lager or rosé in the street at 10am on a Sunday.  It’s worth bearing in mind, too, that everyone taking part laces up pretty early. There will be a series of starts between 9.40am and 11am, with short gaps in between to allow the course ahead to clear. And if watching the runners pushing through the pain barrier leaves you inspired, check out our guide on how to enter the London Marathon. And here’s our winning guide to this year’s marathon. What landmarks can I spot on the London Marathon route? If you hadn’t noticed, the marathon route is loooooong. Starting in Greenwich Park in south-east London and finishing right by Buckingham Palace, there are loads of famous things to see along the way, especially when you’re a spectator. Here are some of the things to look out for: Mile 6: Cutty Sark Mile 12: Tower Bridge Mile 18: Ca

The 18 best sandwiches in the world right now

The 18 best sandwiches in the world right now

Is anything better than a sandwich? From budget-friendly options to sandos packed of high-end ingredients, people love getting their gnashers round a good ’wich all over the world. After all, if you haven't tried a city's national sandwich, have you even really been? So, in an homage to the ancient act of cramming some cracking cheese, meats, fish, or vegetables into two slices of bread, we’ve compiled a list of the world’s very best sandwiches right here – and there’s no wraps, tacos or hotdogs to be seen. Without further ado, sink your teeth into our carby, crunchy roundup. Here are the world’s best sandwiches (according to us). RECOMMENDED:🍝 The best restaurants in the world🎭 The best things to do in the world in 2024🌃 The best cities in the world🌤️ The world's coolest neighbourhoods

London events in February 2024

London events in February 2024

It might seem like only yesterday when you woke up with a furry tongue and a pounding headache on New Year’s Day, but February has already rolled around and it’s a bumper month in 2024 thanks to the Leap Year. So there’s plenty of time to fit in all the spoils of the month including Valentine’s Day, Fashion Week, the Lunar New Year and LGBTQ+ History Month.  There are also exhibition openings, new art shows and some big-name stage productions as London begins to wake up from its post-Christmas malaise. Plus, there’s a plethora of other great things to do, from February half-term fun to eye-popping orchids at Kew, a film festival for young cinephiles at the BFI, a massive, eclectic gig series at the Roundhouse and the last few weeks of London’s revamped festival of mime and physical theatre.  We reckon you should seize your chance to have some fun this February, with our guide to the best things happening in London in February 2024. RECOMMENDED: Things to do in London this week.

The 101 best things to do in London

The 101 best things to do in London

February 2024: We made it, London! The coldest, darkest and bleakest month of the year is over, and the end of winter is in sight. Pretty soon we’ll be spending our weekends lounging around in the park, day drinking at a rooftop bar or getting mild heat stroke at a day festival.  But don’t go wishing the time away, because there’s plenty of fun stuff going on before then. February means Valentine’s Day events, Lunar New Year celebrations, and loads of family-friendly goings-on at London’s galleries and museums for the half-term holidays. And London’s cultural scene kicks back into gear this month after an extended winter break. Theatre openings this month include ‘An Enemy of the People’ starring Matt Smith, the Ralph Fiennes ‘Macbeth’ and the National’s new play ‘Nye’, in which Michael Sheen stars as NHS founder Aneurin Bevan.  Art-wise, there’s Tate Modern’s Yoko Ono retrospective, Barbara Kruger at the Serpentine, and ‘When Form Comes Alive’, the Hayward’s big exhibition about sculpture over the last 60 years.  So wrap up warm and get out there! No matter what your vibe, tastes or interests, there is always something to do in London. When the sun’s out, London’s parks turn into leafy social clubs, restaurants dust off their outdoor seating and fountains erupt from dusty concrete squares and suddenly the city air is filled with alfresco theatre.  Whether you want to see cutting-edge art exhibitions, iconic attractions, secret spots, world-beating theatre, stunning green spa

Chinese New Year parade in London 2024: start time, route and best places to watch

Chinese New Year parade in London 2024: start time, route and best places to watch

London’s annual Chinese New Year parade is back this February, with thousands of revellers expected to flock to the city centre to celebrate the arrival of the Year of the Dragon with dragon and flying lion dances, martial arts displays, firecrackers, a Lions’ Eye-Dotting Ceremony, street food and special feasts at Chinatown’s best restaurants.  Mark your calendar for what is certainly one of the best events in London this February, and be sure to check out other things to do to celebrate the Lunar New Year in London.  When is the Chinese New Year parade in London? The Lunar New Year always falls between late January and mid-February. In 2024, it falls on Chinese New Year falls on Saturday 10 February, with London’s Lunar New Year parade taking place the day after, on Sunday 11 February.  What time does the parade start? Organised by the LCCA (London Chinatown Chinese Association), London’s annual parade features more than 50 different teams of participants and the largest gathering of Chinese lions and dragons in Europe. The parade will start at 10.15am and is expected to finish at around noon. Once it wraps up, there will be various activities stationed across the parade round and on the Main Stage at Trafalgar Square and a smaller stage in Leicester Square. These include street food and arts and crafts stalls, family games, dragon dance demonstrations and a zodiac display, with festivities wrapping up at around 5.30pm.  Chinese New Year parade route The 2024 parade will st

Listings and reviews (260)

North London Book Fest

North London Book Fest

Grade II-listed north London icon Alexandra Palace plays host to the inaugural edition of this brand new literary festival, which promises four jam-packed days of readings, panel discussions, workshops and book signings. Celebrated authors in attendance include former Children’s Laureate Michael Rosen, ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events’ creator Lemony Snicket, bestselling crime writer Erin Kelly and Women’s Prize for Fiction shortlistee Natalie Haynes, while the programme promises something for all genres and ages, presenting ‘a rich tapestry of the UK’s thriving literary scene’. 

Pub in the Park

Pub in the Park

Presented by Michelin-starred chef and longtime ‘Great British Menu’ judge Tom Kerridge, Pub in the Park is a touring food and music festival that aims to bring a convivial public house atmosphere to the great outdoors with loads of delicious pub grub and equally enticing live performances. This year, it’s back for four weekends in and around London throughout the summer: Marlow (May 16-19), Chiswick (June 28-30), Reigate (July 12-14), St Albans (September 6-8).  So, what’s on the menu? There’s an exciting roster of new chefs, including the likes of Mary Berry, former judge on the Great British Bake Off, Jeremy Chan of Ikoyi, a fine-dining restaurant on The Strand, and Becky Excell aka ‘Queen of Gluten Free’. Michel Roux Junior, Simon Rimmer and Andi Oliver are just some previous celebrity chef guests who’ll be back this year, and popular kitchens such as Kerridge’s own The Hand & Flowers, Angela Hartnett’s Cafe Murano and Riwaz by Atul Kochhar are returning by popular demand, too.  Now for the music. The programme at each weekend includes a cracking line-up with stars such as Scouting for Girls, Paloma Faith, Jools Holland, McFly and Olly Murs. Van Morrison is on the programme, too (check out the full line-ups here!).

Kinoteka Polish Film Festival

Kinoteka Polish Film Festival

Taking over a host of London’s iconic screens (such as the Southbank Centre, Ciné Lumière, the Institute of Contemporary Arts, plus many, many more) is this brilliant festival showcasing the best of Polish filmmaking. In its impressive 22nd edition, the likes of contemporary directors as well works from the past will be showcased across London’s venues. The Opening Gala at the BFI Southbank will screen ‘Green Border’, a moving depiction of debates on migration in Europe and the Closing Gala at the BFI IMAX will show ‘The Peasants’, a Polish box office smash-hit, which’ll be accompanied by stunning live music. But there’s plenty more where that came from – for all the info on screenings throughout March, check the programme on the website below. Dzięki!

Human Rights Watch Film Festival

Human Rights Watch Film Festival

The Barbican and Rich Mix cinemas will be once again taken over by this remarkable festival for a week in March, with a programme full of moving, insightful documentaries and feature films. Each screening will be followed by a Q&A with filmmakers, activists and human rights experts. Opening night will show ‘Mediha’, a film by the award-winning Hasan Oswald which documents a Yazidi girl’s return from ISIS captivity. ‘Summer Qamp’, the funny, uplifting work of non-binary filmmaker Jen Marovitz, will close the festival. You can read more about the full programme on the festival’s website.

Museum of the Home

Museum of the Home

4 out of 5 stars

Housed in a set of Grade I-listed eighteenth-century almshouses and formerly known as the Geffrye Museum after their patron, the merchant and slave trader Sir Robert Geffrye, this lovely little Hoxton museum has for more than a century offered a vivid physical history of the English interior. Having closed for two and a half years, the museum reopened in summer 2021 after an £18 million refurbishment that added 80 per cent more exhibition space, including a new lower-ground gallerya new lower-ground floor gallery and 80 per cent more exhibition space.  Displaying original furniture, paintings, textiles and decorative arts, the museum’s permanent Rooms Through Time exhibits display a sequence of typical middle-class living rooms based on real London homes dating from 1600 to the present. There’s a Victorian parlour set up to host a séance, a drawing room from 1915 decorated in the Arts & Crafts style, a parlour from the 1790s in which a family have seemingly been playing cards, and a loft-style Shoreditch apartment owned by a gay couple in 1998. It’s an oddly interesting way to take in domestic history, with any number of intriguing details to catch your eye, from a bell jar of stuffed birds to a particular decorative flourish on a chair. On the ground floor you’ll find an airy café overlooking the lovely gardens, which feature a walled plot for herbs and the Gardens Through Time  exhibit displaying a series in different historical garden styles. The museum also hosts temporar

The Cinema Museum

The Cinema Museum

Nestled round the back of Elephant & Castle in a former workhouse that was once home to a young Charlie Chaplin and his family, Lambeth’s Cinema Museum is an Aladdin’s cave of movie memorabilia, artefacts and film-making equipment.  Founded in 1984 by cinephiles and enthusiastic collectors Martin Humphries and Ronald Grant, its vast and idiosyncratic collections feature everything from art deco cinema seats and 1940s ushers’ uniforms to around 75,000 posters, thousands of books, an estimated one million plus photos and 17 million feet of film. The museum faced potential closure in 2018 when developers purchased its historic building, with over 60,000 fans signing a petition to save it, and high profile industry names including Simon Callow, Ken Loach and Terry Gilliam swooping in to offer support. Having struck a deal to purchase the building from developers, the museum’s immediate future is secure, with fundraising efforts to raise the £1 million required for the sale ongoing.

Garden Museum

Garden Museum

Founded by amateur horticulturist couple John and Rosemary Nicholson in 1977 and housed inside the deconsecrated church of St Mary-at-Lambeth, this riverside museum explores the history of British gardening and its representation in art.  The museum is home to the Archive of Garden Design, a collection working records of leading British garden designers of the 20th and 21st century, while its permanent display features an assemblage of antique gardening tools and a gallery exploring the life and work of John Tradescant, an intrepid plant hunter, gardener to Charles I and founder of the UK’s first public museum, a collection of botanical specimes which he named ‘The Ark’ and displayed at his house in Lambeth, At the heart of the museum is a courtyard garden where you’ll find the tombs of the Tradescants and Admiral Bligh of the Bounty, as well as a collection of rare plants representing John Tradescant’s journeys as a plant collector.  The museum hosts between four and six temporary exhibitions per year, and also houses an on-site restaurant, the Garden Café, which serves lunch daily from 12-3pm.

Foundling Museum

Foundling Museum

4 out of 5 stars

Opened in 2004 on the site of the original Foundling Hospital, Bloomsbury’s Foundling Museum tells the story of England’s first hospital for abandoned children, founded by philanthropist and campaigner Thomas Coram in 1739. As well as looking after some 25,000 children during its 200 years in operation, the Foundling Hospital is also notable for housing the first public art gallery in the UK. Established through donations from leading artists including Gainsborough, Reynolds, Hudson and key supporter William Hogarth, the gallery was one of eighteenth century London’s most fashionable venues, and continues to be a source of revenue for Coram, the charity continuing the hospital’s important work today. Key pieces from the Foundling Collections are on display in the museum’s Picture Gallery, alongside loans and donations from contemporary artists including Tracey Emin and Yinka Shonibare. Visitors can also view eighteenth-century interiors preserved from the original hospital, while a second floor gallery displays highglights from the Gerald Coke Handel Collection, including oil paintings, concert ephemera and a manuscript score of  ‘Messiah’. The composer was another key figure involved in fundraising for the hospital during his lifetime – in 1750 he donated the chapel organ and from that year onwards the ‘Messiah’ was performed under his direction on an annual basis for the Hospital’s benefit. The museum also stages temporary exhibitions on its lower ground floor, with recent

Grant Museum of Zoology

Grant Museum of Zoology

Founded in 1828 for the purposes of teaching comparative anatomy, University College London’s Grant Museum is housed in a former Edwardian library and retains the air of an avid Victorian collector’s house, even while offering visitors the opportunity to engage in dialogue about evolutionary history via smartphones and iPads. Its 68,000 specimen collection encompasses many rare and extinct creatures, including skeletons of the dodo and the zebra-like quagga (which lived in South Africa and was hunted out of existence in the 1880s), as well as plenty of real oddities, not least the jar of moles.  Reopened in February 2024 after a year-long £300,000 refurb, the Bloomsbury museum now features six new showcases exploring humanity’s impact on biodiversity and highlighting the use of the collections in several cutting-edge research projects conducted by the university.

Old Operating Theatre Museum

Old Operating Theatre Museum

Situated in a herb garret in the roof of St Thomas’s Church in Southwark, the Old Operating Theatre Museum is Britain’s oldest surviving purpose-built operating theatre. Built in 1822 as part of the women’s ward for St Thomas’s Hospital, it predates both anaesthetics and antiseptics, and offers a unique (and often grisly) insight into the history of medicine and surgery. The theatre has been restored with original furniture and equipment, including a nineteenth-century operating table, surgical instruments and pathological specimens. Visitors enter via a vertiginous spiral staircase to view a semicircular operating theatre with tiered viewing seats for up to 150 medical students. Sanitised reenactments are sometimes held – just as gruesome as the operating tools that look like torture implements – alongside more light-hearted events ranging from craft workshops to comedy nights, while the venue’s programme of temporary exhibitions often combine art with explorations of pathology.

Museum of Brands

Museum of Brands

Founded in 1984 by consumer historian Robert Opie, and based in its current home since 2015, this Notting Hill museum houses highlights from a collection of some 12,000 items tracing the history of branding in Britain over the past 200 years. Its permanent display is called the ‘Time Tunnel’, and comprises of a maze of dark cabinets stuffed with wrappers, magazines, posters, toys, boxes and other colourful curios arranged in date order. With the arrival of each new decade an information panel helps to put the changing designs and new fashions into context. A highlight – literally light thanks to a sunny, south-facing gallery room – is a sort of shrine to a few particularly recognisable brands. One cabinet holds every iteration of can and bottle produced by Guinness, another is packed with cereal boxes from Kellogg’s, even Brasso gets its moment to , *ahem*, shine. This is a museum that will appeal to any lover of stuff, a nostalgia-stuffed tribute to the many, many things we buy.

Black Cultural Archives

Black Cultural Archives

This much-needed centre for black British history looks out onto Windrush Square, which is named after the ship that brought Caribbean workers to war-torn ’40s Britain. Black Cultural Archives preserves these peoples’ stories in its vaults, alongside temporary exhibitions which show how people of African and Caribbean origin have shaped UK history. Recent subjects have included the legacy of Windrush, the contemporary Black Britsh art scene and Black resistance to scientific bias.

News (144)

Diva down! Iconic East London queer venue The Glory is closing

Diva down! Iconic East London queer venue The Glory is closing

Founded by drag queens Jonny Woo and John Sizzle with their business partner Colin Rothbart back in 2014, pint-sized Kingsland Road pub The Glory is a jewel in the fabulous crown of east London’s ever-dwindling queer scene, beloved by all who pass through its unassuming blue doors.  Head down to the Haggerston venue on an average evening and you’ll find scene veterans like Princess Julia and Jeffrey Hinton on the decks, east London’s most out-there drag artists performing surreal cabaret on the tiny gold stage and a raucous crowd of spectacularly well-heeled creative types cackling in the smoking area. At least until the end of January, when the legendary venue will cease trading at its current location, as announced this afternoon. ‘It’s with much sadness that we shall be closing the doors of The Glory, as we know it, on 31st January 2024,’ its owners announced in a statement released on the venue’s Instagram page. ‘For us all, the staff, performers, DJs AND our much-valued customers, we know this is upsetting, but we have decided to relocate as our building is finally being redeveloped and we simply can’t cannot continue to operate as we'd like.’ View this post on Instagram A post shared by THE GLORY (@thegloryldn) To anyone who has spent more than five minutes on London’s queer scene, news of another LGBTQ+ venue’s closure probably won’t come as a huge surprise. While the number of queer venues in the capital has remained fairly stable in recent years,

Where to get Chanukah doughnuts in London

Where to get Chanukah doughnuts in London

While the goyim (non-Jews) do Christmas, Jews do Chanukah. While they have mince pies, we have sufganiyot: perfect, pillow-y doughnuts eaten as deep-fried treats during the festival of lights. The deep-fried bit is important: Chanukah is about the Maccabean revolt against the Greeks in the second century BCE, when there was only enough sacred oil in the Second Temple to last for one night, but it miraculously lasted for eight. To celebrate, Jews the world over eat oily food. It’s a very convenient excuse for scoffing a load of latkes and doughnuts. How are sufganiyot different from doughnuts? Glad you asked. They’re um… a bit lighter, basically. That’s kind of it. You could argue they’re closer to French beignets than English or American doughnuts, but what really matters is stuffing your face with some deep-fried dough and saying ‘up yours’ to the Ancient Greeks. Here are some amazing (mostly) Jewish bakeries in London where you can indulge yourself while sticking two fingers up to Antiochus.  Grodzinksi Photograph: Jess Hand London’s oldest kosher bakery was founded in 1888 by Belarussian expats Harris and Judith Grodzinski, and is still going strong across its locations today. It’s a bit complex as the owner retired and then one of the OG shops, in Golders, was sold, then bought back again. But here’s the thing: you just need to eat, in whatever shop it is, owned by whoever (Grodz or Grodzinski). Pop in for some sweet treats and you may well be tempted to dine on the im

‘You can’t give monetary value to art and music’: Thurston Moore on his favourite London music venue

‘You can’t give monetary value to art and music’: Thurston Moore on his favourite London music venue

Thurston Moore’s early music may seem synonymous with 1980s New York punk rock, but he’s been a Londoner for well over a decade. Having previously lived in Stoke Newington, the 65-year-old has moved south of the city (the exact location he keeps vague), where between making solo albums and running his record label, Ecstatic Peace, he’s embraced London’s improvised live music scene. Fitting perhaps, given the DIY nature of his work as Sonic Youth’s frontman. The band’s abrasive, free-natured sound often paired rapid guitar riffs with droning basslines and slowly clattering drums that always felt very in the moment. His new book ‘Sonic Life’ is, as he says, ‘All the musical inspirations I have from all the different ephemera, books and recordings that defined my growing years. ‘Then the advent of Sonic Youth and how we moved through the course of the 80s and 90s.’ To tie in with the launch of his new book, the musician spoke to us about his favourite London music venue, IKLECTIK, an independent space that champions new, free-form music. With the threats of closure ahead of planned redevelopment, Moore is keen to highlight the importance of this personal sacred space.  ‘IKLECTIK is found underneath the Waterloo Bridge in Old Paradise Yard. It’s been there only nine years, so right after I relocated here. I was living in Stoke Newington at the time, very close to Cafe OTO, which is sort of the critical listening room for experimental music. But I started hearing about this new pl

Where to celebrate Beaujolais Nouveau Day 2023 in London

Where to celebrate Beaujolais Nouveau Day 2023 in London

Fancy yourself a bit of an oenophile? Then you’ll probably already know that this coming Thursday is a pretty big day in the wine world. That’s because the third Thursday of November is Beaujolais Nouveau Day, i.e. the first day on which this year’s bottles of the good stuff are allowed to be sold. A gamay grape wine from the Beaujolais district of Burgundy, Beaujolais Nouveau is one of the few varieties of plonk that’s sold during the same year in which it’s produced. The juicy red has gained a bit of a following in London in recent years, with many of the capital’s favourite wine bars throwing special events to celebrate the cult cuvée. Here are some we especially like the look of.  Gordon’s Beaujolais Breakfast If Beaujolais Nouveau Day is the equivalent of Christmas in your world, then Gordon’s should be the first place you head to on the Big Day. London’s oldest wine bar is playing every oenophile’s St Nick, letting you sip on glasses of the good stuff bright and early from 8am on, so you can sample this year’s crop before everyone else. They’ll be serving up Full English brekkies to soak up all the booze, and nice strong coffees for anyone needing to sober up quickly. All the same, we’d probably still advise going into the office on this particular Thursday. Gordon’s Wine Bar. Thu Nov 16. Free entry. Top Cuvée Beaujolais Nouveau Masterclass If there’s a burgeoning trend on the British wine scene, you can bet that London’s most ‘banter’ wine merchants will be heavily i

Up-and-coming acts to catch at Pitchfork London

Up-and-coming acts to catch at Pitchfork London

Ever looked at a music festival line-up and realise, with abject horror, how desperately out of touch you are? Several of Time Out London’s editorial team felt like that when Pitchfork released the line-up for its London festival, which is taking over some of the capital’s best-loved music venues this week for its third edition.  Among big hitters like the Mercury Prize-winning jazz quintet Ezra Collective, riot grl legends Sleater-Kinney and dance music protégé Yaeji are a frankly concerning number of head-scratchers, even for us NTS-listening, ‘Crack’ magazine-reading Cafe Oto regulars.  Luckily for you, we’ve spent the last few weeks swotting up on the lesser-known artists appearing on the eclectic bill, so that we can tell you who is worth buying a ticket for. Here are some of our favourite up-and-comers to look out for.  Balming Tiger Who are they?: Balming Tiger are a South Korean multi-national alternative K-pop collective consisting of rapper Omega Sapien, DJ Abyssm director San Yawn, music video directors Jan'Qui and Leesuho, singer-songwriters Sogumm, Wnjn, Mudd the Student, and editor Henson. The hip-hop single ‘Sexy Nukim’ with BTS’s RM is a good entry point. For fans of: BTS, NewJeans, So!YoON. Village Underground. Wed Nov 8.  CHAI Who are they?: A sugary sweet experimental pop group blending elements of Tom Tom Club, Basement Jaxx and CSS to create punchy anthems inspired by female empowerment and redefining ‘kawaii’ culture.  For fans of: Confidence Man, Kero

The scandalous stories behind six London statues

The scandalous stories behind six London statues

Twenty-first century London is saturated with low-level smut. Its streets house three separate penis waffle purveyors and you can hardly walk into a gift shop without your eyes being assaulted by boob or bum-shaped novelty vases. But in times of yore, Londoners had to go to extreme lengths for a glimpse of tantalising nudity. They had to seek out statues with intriguing curves, modelled in fleshy marble, and discreetly ogle them until the nearest policeman moved them on with a swift jab of his truncheon. Here are some of the most outrageously sexy statues of yesteryear: seek them out, but bring the smelling salts in case it all gets too much. Achilles, Hyde Park Photograph: Claire Ward / Wikimedia Commons The body part that the Greek warrior Achilles was classically best known for was his heel. But that all changed when a scandalous statue of the hero was placed in Hyde Park in 1822. It was funded by Ladies of England, a patriotic women’s group who were presumably quite embarrassed by the scandal his lovingly chiselled anatomy provoked. A fig leaf was attached soon after. But it still attracted undue attention from Londoners including, allegedly, the storied actor Laurence Olivier, who once opined that the statue had ‘the best arse in London’. Time to see for yourself? Michelangelo’s David, The V&A Photograph: Shutterstock The V&A Museum’s magnificent replica of Michelangelo’s David was given to Queen Victoria as a birthday present in 1857... but only after a tasteful l

Our favourite pumpkin dishes to try in London this Halloween

Our favourite pumpkin dishes to try in London this Halloween

Be strong. You too can fight the seasonal siren song of pumpkin spice! The sugary blend of cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and ginger – there is, in a wild plot twist, no actual pumpkin in the ubiquitous autumnal flavour – has hijacked hot drinks for the past few years and we remain annoyed by it. But rather than flipping over every pumpkin spice latte we see, we’ve decided to celebrate the humble pumpkin instead, and point you in the direction of the best savoury squash dishes available in London this autumn. ‌Steamed Delica Pumpkin at Poon’s Wontoneria, Fitzrovia Photograph: Courtesy of Poon’s Wontoneria Herald the extension of Chinese restaurant royalty Amy Poon’s wonton-tastic pop-up (now running until February 2024) with this steamed pumpkin dish. Served alongside dried tofu skin also known as fǔzhú, as well as Chinese mushrooms and black bean sauce, these perfect hunks of soft pumpy are just what you need to cosy up to as the nights draw in. Yes, we did just call in ‘pumpy’. Get on board.  23 Charlotte St, W1T 1RW. £11.50. Pumpkin Arancina at Norma, Fitzrovia Photograph: Norma An oozy nugget of carb-based gold, this is pumpkin done the Sicilian way. The godfather of seasonal rice balls, this Delica delicacy comes topped with shavings of scamorza cheese and sage, and makes for the perfect edible autumn accessory. And if you really, really need that tawdry pumpkin spice hit, then scroll down to Norma’s dessert menu, and check out the pumpkin spiced tiramisu they’ll be offe

The 15 best LGBTQ+ club nights in London right now

The 15 best LGBTQ+ club nights in London right now

London’s LGBTQ+ scene has faced its fair share of challenges – among them: gentrification, a pandemic and the ongoing cost-of-living crisis. But somehow, the city’s vibrant and defiant queer community always bounces back. In addition to some awesome LGBTQ+ clubs and bars, London has a pretty dazzling array of LGBTQ+ club nights. Here are 15 of the very best, from radical queer raves to ridiculously fun pop parties. 1. Feel It Held every Friday at London Bridge venue Omeara, this self-styled ‘queer super-party’ lives up to its billing. The genuinely diverse crowd includes plenty who like to dress up, and plenty who like to undress as the night progresses, especially in the sweaty main room. Banging house is the soundtrack there, while two other rooms are dedicated to chilled disco and pop. Brilliantly produced by London club legend Jodie Harsh and the Little Gay Brother crew, Feel It brings Berlin-style thrills and spills to south London. @feelitparty Photograph: Henri TButch, Please! 2. Butch, Please! Launched by Tabs Benjamin in 2016, this monthly club night at south London’s Royal Vauxhall Tavern celebrates the butch identity and its place in queer culture. Each party has a different theme – from ‘kinky butch’ to ‘muscle butch’ – and prides itself on being fully ‘dyke-centric’ from the performers to the door policy. It’s a space for lesbian and bi women, as well as trans and non-binary people, so don’t bring your cis male mates. @butchpleaselondon 3. Horse Meat Disco Ther

London Fields could be getting a swanky new swimming pool

London Fields could be getting a swanky new swimming pool

If you’ve ever tried nabbing an hour-long slot at London Fields Lido on a hot July afternoon, you’ll already know that it’s somewhat akin to trying to secure tickets to Glastonbury.  The destination of choice for east London’s outdoor swimming fanatics, London Fields’ 50-metre heated pool has become progressively more popular in recent years, welcoming more than 340,000 visitors in 2022. Now Hackney Council has proposed planned improvements to the facilities that will allow even more locals to feel the wind in their hair as they consistently fail to overtake an octogenarian in the slow lane (just me?) via the addition of a new training pool where beginners will be able to learn to swim. Photograph: Hackney Council Designed by architects FaulknerBrowns – who previously worked with Hackney Council on the nearby Britannia Leisure Centre – the proposed plans feature a 13m x 7m indoor training pool in place of the previously decommissioned paddling pool, as well as accessible toilets, a moveable floor and a viewing gallery.  The proposal for the pool extension is currently in a six-week consultation stage in which local residents are invited to have their say on the project, at the end of which a planning application will be submitted. Should this be successful, construction will begin at the end of the year and is expected to be completed by the summer of 2024.  If you’re a Hackney resident and fancy weighing in (or maybe diving in?) on the plans, you can access the online sur

An exhibition of treasures found during the building of HS2 has opened

An exhibition of treasures found during the building of HS2 has opened

Remember that historic burial site in Euston that had to be excavated to make way for the new HS2 station? Archaeologists found all sorts of cool stuff during the four-year works, and it’s all on display now as part of a new exhibition at St James’s Church in Piccadilly.  Headland Archaeology and the Museum of London Archaeology worked on the project between 2017 and 2021, sensitively exhuming and documenting more than 30,000 bodies from the St James’s Burial Ground in the largest archaeological excavation of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century burials ever undertaken in the UK. The site’s clay-based soil means that the coffins interred there between 1789 and 1853 have been much better preserved than at other sites of a similar age. The project has proved to be unusually rich in discoveries as a result, with organic items including clothing articles and wooden coffins uncovered intact during the dig.   Photograph: Courtesy of HS2 Personal items ranging from clay pipes and pocket watches to hair combs and slippers can now be viewed as part of the ‘Stories of St James’s Burial Ground’ exhibition on display at the Sir Christopher Wren-designed church which conducted the majority of the graveyard’s burials. The exhibition also features these only-slightly-sinister cardboard models (above), scattered around the church’s pews, all of which depict real people who were buried at the site, from dressmaker and amputee Elizabeth Mercer, to businessman Charles Fortnum, a member of the

London is officially the most picturesque destination in the world during springtime

London is officially the most picturesque destination in the world during springtime

It might not seem like it given the miserable weather across the UK this week, but spring is officially just days away. The impending change of season is especially good news if you happen to live in London, because a new report has just named the capital as the most picturesque city in the world during springtime.  It’s not all that surprising, really. Sure, London might have a reputation for being a bit grey during the colder months, but its world-famous landmarks, gorgeous works of architecture and leafy green spaces really come into their own when the temperature starts to climb. From World Heritage sites like Kew Gardens and The Tower of London to the plethora of springtime flowers that bloom across the city each year, there are a shit ton of picture-perfect London scenes to post on socials. And plenty of people are doing exactly that according to the study conducted by Travelbag, who compiled data for over 170 destinations across the world based on hashtag usage on Instagram. The tourism website found that users of the photo and video-sharing site used the hashtag #springinlondon for over 100,000 posts, beating out every other major city for hashtag usage. Second on the list was Paris, with Instagram users posting 78,981 times using #springinparis, while Seattle came in at number three on the list thanks to the 24,220 posts made using #springinseattle. Here’s the top ten in full: London - 100,832 Paris - 78,981 Seattle - 24,220 Melbourne - 23,549 Chicago - 23,536 Sydne

We went for a pint with Catherine Cohen

We went for a pint with Catherine Cohen

Catherine Cohen loves a photoshoot. New York City’s favourite ‘one-woman cabaret chanteuse’ is extremely jet-lagged when she turns up at Time Out’s office less than 24 hours after landing in the city ahead of her first UK tour. Barely ten minutes later, she’s got a conspiratorial glint in her eye and a fake Martini in hand as she reclines on the leather banquettes of our local old-man boozer – shout out The Cross Keys in Covent Garden – looking for all the world like she’s just taken huge pleasure in telling an over-refreshed patron to sling their hook.  This impressively gung-ho approach to self-promotion is pretty much exactly what you’d expect if you’ve watched Cohen’s 2022 Netflix special ‘The Twist?… She’s Gorgeous’, a recording of her monthly show at NYC cabaret venue Joe’s Pub that begins with a jazz-hands-heavy musical number called ‘Look at Me’.  It also comes in quite handy when you’ve got a brand-new show to promote. After we’ve finished alarming the pub regulars, we head back to the Time Out photo studio to chat about it. Photograph: Jess Hand Hey, Catherine, welcome back to London. Let’s start with a quickfire round of London v New York.  ‘Ugh, impossible! Impossible to choose!’ And yet… subway or tube? ‘The tube is better.’ Salt-beef bagel or pie and mash? ‘What’s a salt-beef bagel?’ Is that not a really New York thing?  ‘I guess it would be more like bagel and lox.’  Right. ‘It’s okay, we can help each other. And I don’t know about pie, but I’ve had, like, ba