Art

Art galleries, exhibitions and reviews of the latest and best art in New York

Art

Where to see the best outdoor art this summer

With warm weather finally here, there’s no better time to get outdoors and interact with art

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Art

The best contemporary paintings now on view in NYC art galleries

This month, galleries in New York are offering a cornucopia of artists and styles in contemporary painting

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Art

The top five New York art shows this week

Check out our art critic's suggestions for the best art exhibitions you don’t want to miss

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Art

Take a tour of Gilbert & George's most salacious moments

The British art-making duo has never hesitated to cross the line into bad taste

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Blog

Hundreds turned away on the first day of "First Show/Last Show"

Hundreds of people eager to see inside the Renaissance Revival building 190 Bowery this weekend were left disappointed

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Must-see art exhibitions

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Top art this week

With an art scene as prominent and ever-changing as New York’s, you don’t want to miss these essential exhibitions.

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Art

Time Out's picks

The best art shows in New York, as chosen by Time Out's critics.

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Best free art in NYC

Looking for some free things to do, art enthusiasts? Thought so.

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Current art exhibition reviews

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David Shrigley

Making sense seem like nonsense is one way to describe David Shrigley’s faux-naif work, which combines sweet childlike rendering with a sour, sardonic tone. Here the space is salon hung with paintings, such as a crude, store-hours sign marked closed for each day. In a POV video resembling an arcade game, a driver hurtles heedlessly past wretched souls along the highway, crying for help. In Shrigley’s world, whimsy becomes torment, and black humor settles on innocence like coal dust on snow.—Howard Halle

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Art

Rosy Keyser, "The Hell Bitch"

The paintings in this excellent solo show, Keyser’s first at Maccarone, are clearly indebted to Philip Guston’s abstractions, Robert Rauschenberg’s combines and Eva Hesse’s rope works, among other works from the past. For the most part, they wear their influences well. The exhibition opens with the medium-sized canvas Bird of Paradise, a dark mass of fabric, paint, mica and silky fringe. Calling to mind a shadowy patch of undergrowth, it is beautiful, irritable and distinctly feminine in the manner of Joan Mitchell. In contrast, the airy, frenetic Music for a Drowned World is a ten-foot-long stretcher on which only a couple of large swags of canvas remain, with the rest of the painting’s space crisscrossed by webs of paint-soaked fringe topped by a twisted length of silvery metal corner bead. Such real-world materials regularly take the place of paint in Keyser’s works, as in the nicely off-kilter Mi Tata(Drug Mule), which contains a disarticulated wood bead seat cover. Less successful are two new diagrammatic wall sculptures made from welded square steel tubing and sand bags, but they show the artist moving in a new and potentially rewarding direction. The title of the exhibition comes from the artist’s name for a canvas she keeps in her studio to test materials and techniques on—a “living palette” something like a petri dish. Knowing this makes one want to see more of that private experimentation made public, as in the works here, which flirt with failure to great effect.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Blog

Review: The Whitney opens its new home with a survey of American Art

A new home purpose-built to kick major institutional ass

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Art

"2015 Triennial: Surround Audience"

As everyone expected, the New Museum’s third triennial of youngish artists—curated by new-media maven Lauren Cornell and artist Ryan Trecartin, whose own frenetic, extended video selfies were a hit of the first Triennial—abounds with digitized avatars in one form or another. The showstopper, Frank Benson’s seductively hyperreal sculpture Juliana, was rendered from a 3-D scan of transgender artist Juliana Huxtable (whose photographic self-portraits nearby unfortunately pale in comparison). Seen reclining nude on a pedestal, she exudes an exoticism that arises as much from her otherworldly metallic sheen as it does her unconventional combination of sexual features. Yet a nagging resemblance to Jean-Paul Goude’s images of Grace Jones raises unexamined questions about Benson’s work within a history of white artists representing shiny black bodies—and also, why so many artists in the show seem unaware of the wheels they reinvent. Happily, a number of works look outward instead of narcissistically inward. Josh Kline’s room-filling installation, Freedom, centers on a video of an uncanny President Obama, created with face-substitution software, giving the defiant inaugural speech we’d all wished for. Close by, under cell-phone trees with credit-card leaves, life-size Teletubbies in riot gear sport tablet devices playing loops of actual cops reading civilian Twitter feeds, some taken from Occupy Wall Street. Kline’s evocation of aspirational politics, malleable identities and the con

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Upcoming art exhibitions

Art

“Zoe Leonard: Analogue"

This ambitious project made up of both color and black-and-white photos was created over a ten year period, and takes its cues from Eugène Atget’s iconic documentation of ancient Parisian neighborhoods disappearing under the onslaught of modernization. In similar fashion, Leonard used a vintage Rolleiflex camera to capture vanishing mom-and-pop enterprises. Starting out in her East Village neighborhood, Leonard expanded her search to include storefronts in Eastern Europe, Africa, Cuba and Mexico, with an eye towards the colorful hand-made signage distinguishing each place. A subset of shots picture businesses selling Kodak film, with the brand’s distinctive yellow-and-red logo emblazoned on awnings, door frames and window displays. These last images nod to Leonard’s title and its reference to a film medium that is itself becoming obsolete thanks to digital photography.

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Art

“Picasso Sculpture”

Picasso trained as a painter, yet his forays into sculpture produced some of the most groundbreaking art of the 20th-century. Works like Guitar, with its open construction of planar forms, and Absinthe Glass, with its addition of a real example of the sieved spoon used to pour the wormwood concoction over a lump of sugar (the preferred method for drinking it), anticipated Constructivism and Duchamp’s Readymade. That fact that Picasso was essential self-taught as a sculptor liberated him think outside the box. This show surveys his career-long engagement with the medium he transformed.

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Art

Joaquín Torres-García

Modern art from Latin American is still underappreciated in the United States. MoMA, however, was a pioneer in promoting modernists from the region, and this look back at the work of Uruguayan artist Joaquín Torres-García (1874–1949) certainly fits in that tradition. One of South America’s most important figures, Torres-García developed a style indebted to Klee, Magritte, Míro and Mondrian. His paintings in particular distilled these disparate influences into overall compositions featuring geometric forms and flattened figurative outlines arranged in syncopated patterns. His subjects included cityscapes, which were sometimes reduced to surreal jumbles of glyphs, or empty compartmentalized niches. Surreal and timeless as tomb paintings, Torres-García's work certainly deserve admittance into the MoMA canon.

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Art

Upcoming summer exhibitions

With warm weather finally here, there’s no better time to get outdoors and interact with art

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Most popular art stories

Art

Preview the Botanical Garden's extravagant Frida Kahlo exhibition

The New York Botanical Garden pays tribute to the iconic artist's deep appreciation for nature

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Art

A fascinating look at the early years of Andy Warhol

Learn how Andrew Warhola became Andy Warhol, and discover his early works at MoMA's latest installation

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Art

See photos of the brand new Whitney Museum

Investigate the Whitney’s latest incarnation, boasting 63,000 square feet of space across eight floors in its new home

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Art

Lisa Yuskavage previews her latest paintings

Lisa Yuskavage’s newest paintings and pastels take viewers on a love-generation trip back to the garden

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Best art galleries in New York

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Best Chelsea galleries

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Best art galleries on the Lower East Side

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Best photography galleries

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Best art galleries on 57th Street

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Latest art news

Blog

Whitney hangs Pollock sideways: Bonehead move or revisionist argument?

As if the Whitney hasn't called enough attention to itself with the opening of its new building...

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Blog

New Bowery wall mural goes up with Old Glory and baby Hulk onboard

The image features the Stars and Stripes, with each star overlaid by a skull and each stripe made up as a band of English’s advertising parodies

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Blog

Harlem art fair launches the same week as Frieze New York

Frieze New York is hosting its 3rd edition on Randall's Island May 14–17

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Blog

Cool off and chill out with water walled rooms and more at Brooklyn Bridge Park

Warm weather means sunny days in the park, green grass, and, at Brooklyn Bridge Park anyway, interactive public art

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New York art in pictures

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See photos from Justin Bettman’s amazing #SetintheStreet

Get your photograph taken at this Times Square installation

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See classic photos of the Lower East Side’s ‘90s squatter population

Photographer Ash Thayer’s images of a more Bohemian Manhattan reveal New York life in an edgier time

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NYC’s art world: The Mad Men years

In art as in advertising, the ’60s were tumultuous and transformational.

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A guide to the Italian Futurism art movement

From its radical beginnings to its fascist incarnation, Italian Futurism shocked the world.

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Best museums in New York

Museums

Whitney Museum of American Art

Like the Guggenheim, the Whitney Museum is set apart by its unique architecture

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Museums

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Hang out in an Egyptian temple, gawk at period costumes and take pictures on the gorgeous rooftop garden

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Museums

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim Museum is as famous for its landmark building as it is for its impressive collection and daring temporary shows

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Museums

The American Museum of Natural History

No matter which wing you wander through or where your curiosities lie, it’s hard to explore without being awestruck

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