Art

Art galleries, exhibitions and reviews of the latest and best art in New York

Art

The 100 best paintings in New York

Leading artists, gallery owners, curators and critics pick the best paintings to be seen in NYC

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Art

Armory Arts Week preview

The biggest week of the art-world calendar arrives with nine big art fairs bringing in collectors and visitors from around the globe

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Björk dresses as a cactus for her MoMA preview

Check out Björk's latest video, "Black Lake," specially commissioned by the Modern for her upcoming exhibition

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Art

The top five New York art shows this week

Check out our art critic's suggestions for the best art exhibitions you don’t want to miss

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Things to do

Tour artist Alex Da Corte's haunted house exhibition, "Die Hexe"

Take a digital tour through the eerie rooms of Da Corte's lush, mysterious installation

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Must-see art exhibitions

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Top art this week

With an art scene as prominent and ever-changing as New York’s, you don’t want to miss these essential exhibitions.

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Time Out's picks

The best art shows in New York, as chosen by Time Out's critics.

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Best free art in NYC

Looking for some free things to do, art enthusiasts? Thought so.

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Current art exhibition reviews

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Charles W. Hutson

Small in scale, yet huge in impact, the 30 or so exquisitely rendered landscapes on view here—most barely larger than a standard sheet of paper—look like the efforts of an Impressionist master. Yet they are the handiwork of a truly remarkable figure: Charles W. Hutson. Born in 1840 in South Carolina, Hutson was entirely self-taught, a Civil War veteran who didn’t take up painting until the last 30 years of his life—and who didn’t have his first solo show until 1931 at age 91. Still, he earned enough renown to have been included in They Taught Themselves: American Primitive Painters of the 20th Century, written by Sidney Janis. Hutson settled in New Orleans, and certainly something about the humid countryside around the Crescent City added to the languorous mood of his pastels, watercolors and oils, which focus on the places where water meets land: quiet threshold scenes that are often punctuated with trees, reeds, staves and smokestacks that read almost like figures contemplating the water’s edge or absorbed in melancholic reflection. His nuanced evocations of atmosphere, temperature and weather give nature a palpable presence. Hutson’s work fits into the history of American landscape painting, somewhere between the simplified modernism of Milton Avery and the hyperbolic nature-magic of Charles Burchfield. Intensely dramatic, his images conjure the immensity on the horizon, signaling a world about to change.—Jennifer Coates

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Art

"Santu Mofokeng: A Metaphorical Biography"

Since 2011, the New York outpost of Germany’s Walther Collection has been an important showcase for modern and contemporary African photography. Case in point: this excellent minisurvey of the work of Santu Mofokeng, titled, “A Metaphorical Biography.” It positions him as both a photojournalist and an artist concerned with questions of meaning and representation. Born in Johannesburg in 1956, Mofokeng began his professional career in the mid-1980s as a member of the photo agency Afrapix. In the turbulent decade leading up to apartheid’s end, he produced photo essays on South African townships, offering a more complex view of their inhabitants’ lives than the coverage found in the global media. Taken between 1988 and 1994, the pictures include a wonderful image of a solemn man seen in a mirror while eating, and another of a golf game being played on scrubland. During the 1990s Mofokeng began to collect late-19th- and early-20th-century studio portraits of middle-class black South Africans. These became his 1997 slide show, The Black Photo Album/Look at Me: 1890–1950, in which intertitles provide biographical information on some of the subjects, while also questioning what their real-life experiences might have been. Another series on South Africa’s sacred Motouleng caves includes a 2004 photograph of a man wearing a vest, leather work coat and hat with ear flaps. His eyes are closed, but he’s fiercely present. The picture is actually a portrait of Mofokeng’s brother, a traditi

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Art

Claudia Comte, No Melon No Lemon

While Claudia Comte’s solo debut at Barbara Gladstone demonstrates her talent for handsome installation, the young Swiss artist gets bogged down in style quotes. She begins by covering the walls in yellow stripes, a pattern similar to one used by Sylvie Fleury two years ago at Salon 94—a show that itself was channeling the work of French Conceptualist Daniel Buren. Comte doesn’t stop there. She divvies up the space with burnt-wood partitions, incised with wavering vertical lines that bring to mind Frank Stella’s Black Paintings. These are hung with bar-shaped panels, stacked one above the other in a manner recalling Donald Judd’s ascending columns of boxes. They’re also fronted by organically abstract wooden sculptures that cheekily revamp everyone from Constantin Brancusi to Barbara Hepworth. One resembles a cat climbing a post. Comte uses the gallery’s high ceiling to maximum effect, creating an immersive environment that’s both vivid and subtle. The sculptures are mounted on benchlike pedestals cut from the aforementioned dividers. Jutting out into the room, they leave voids that set off or frame the objects in a seamless interface of art and display. Missing in all of this is Comte’s artistic individuality. Her sense of humor is apparent, and some, if not enough, of her sensibility comes through in the handworked quality of the sculptures and the wonky imperfection of the partitions. But mostly her piece is a hit parade of art-historical references, absent an argument for

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Art

"Jean Dubuffet: Soul of the Underground"

Assembled from MoMA’s holdings of work by Jean Dubuffet (1901–1985), this beautifully realized exhibition illustrates how Dubuffet’s rebellion against conventional good taste and artistic hierarchies was enacted through his materials and techniques. Comprising pieces from the 1940s to the mid-1960s, “Jean Dubuffet: Soul of the Underground” includes wonderful figurative sculptures assembled from slag and tree roots, as well as paintings and drawings depicting people—wandering through deserts, packed into subway cars—crudely scratched into thickly impastoed canvases or inked paper. But its primary focus is on Dubuffet the printmaker, using the medium as “an incomparable laboratory and an efficacious means of invention.” Central to the show is a selection of lithographs from Dubuffet’s series “Phenomena” (1958–1962), a compendium of 362 allover compositions, created by scuffing, scratching and staining lithographic stones, sometimes with stuff like fruit peels and tapioca. Often, he would cut up the finished results to produce new works. For the most part, Dubuffet’s recycled prints are representational. In the collage Black Earth (1955), the three figures occupying a nocturnal patch of gray and black landscape are fashioned from the same white-spattered paper as the starry sky above. Elsewhere, characters such as The Sleepwalker and Carrot Nose (both from 1961) sport hats and clothes seemingly made out of cosmic dust. But other pieces are more confounding: paintings with phra

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Upcoming art exhibitions

Art

"The Hugo Boss Prize 2014: Paul Chan, Nonprojections for New Lovers"

The work of Paul Chan, this year's winner of The Hugo Boss Prize, is hard to characterize, but his multimedia installations all seem to share an haunted, enigmatic quality and a predilection for representing presence with absence. His piece here, for example, consists of a circular arrangement of running projectors that project nothing, while getting their power from worn shoes repurposed as electrical outlets.

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Art

"Scenes for a New Heritage: Contemporary Art from the Collection"

MoMA is doing a total overhaul of its contemporary art galleries with a new installation of works in all mediums by 40 artists from around the world. Taken from the permanent collection, the offerings—some never exhibited before— were all made during the past 30 years, and reflect in different ways "the political, social, and cultural flux that have shaped the current global landscape."

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Art

Björk

MoMA celebrates the multi-faceted career of the Icelandic alt diva with a retrospective encompassing the many mediums she’s worked in: Music of course, but also art, costume design and video, among others. The installation includes an immersive “experience” in sound and film created especially for the show.

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Art

"Laurie Simmons: How We See"

Widely known for her photographs of dolls, ventriloquist dummies and objects on legs, Laurie Simmons has been a fixture on the New York art scene since the mid-1970s, when she first emerged as part of the Pictures Generation. This show presents new photos of fashion models rendered uncanny thanks by the addition of eyes painted on their closed eyelids. You might say that Simmons here is putting l'oeil into trompe l'oeil.

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Most popular art stories

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Kehinde Wiley talks about portraiture and going for baroque

Kehinde Wiley’s brand of hip-hop portraiture blows up at the Brooklyn Museum

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The 10 best art shows coming in 2015

We look ahead to art in 2015—from a 14-year survey of Kehinde Wiley's career, to Björk's most anticipated retrospective

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Art

Get your fill of cat pictures at the Japan Society

The Japan Society to present purr-fect show of cat prints this spring

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Art

Q&A: Philip Taaffe

Taaffe’s latest paintings are inspired by the war in Syria and Matisse

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Best art galleries in New York

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Best Chelsea galleries

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Best art galleries on the Lower East Side

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Best photography galleries

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Best art galleries on 57th Street

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Latest art news

Blog

Artist renders state pols as New York kitties

Bet you've never pictured a New York politician as a cat

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Blog

Guess what? Women are still underrepresented in the art world

We know from Patricia Arquette's impassioned acceptance speech for Best Supporting Actress at Sunday night's Oscars that women are given the short end of the stick in Hollywood

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Blog

New York is thinking about storm-proofing against the next Sandy: Good Idea!

Along with floodwaters and blackouts, 2012's Superstorm Sandy brought with it the sudden realization that New York City was highly susceptible to going the way of Atlantis in this age of global warming

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Condo sellers asking $150 million for penthouse because in filthy rich New York, they can

The rich! They're just like us, except with, you know, a lot more money. Lots more

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New York art in pictures

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The 10 best art shows of 2014

The absolute best of New York’s art shows and exhibits from 2014.

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Art

NYC’s art world: The Mad Men years (slide show)

In art as in advertising, the ’60s were tumultuous and transformational.

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Art

A guide to the Italian Futurism art movement

From its radical beginnings to its fascist incarnation, Italian Futurism shocked the world.

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Preview: Chuck Close, “Nudes 1967–2014”

Going beyond his famed portraits, Close directed his work to areas below the neck, too.

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Best museums in New York

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Whitney Museum of American Art

Like the Guggenheim, the Whitney Museum is set apart by its unique architecture

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Hang out in an Egyptian temple, gawk at period costumes and take pictures on the gorgeous rooftop garden

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Museums

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim Museum is as famous for its landmark building as it is for its impressive collection and daring temporary shows

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Museums

The American Museum of Natural History

No matter which wing you wander through or where your curiosities lie, it’s hard to explore without being awestruck

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