Art

Art galleries, exhibitions and reviews of the latest and best art in New York

Art

Albert Oehlen speaks about his career highlights

Oehlen talks about his paintings and their references to digital technology

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The coolest art day trips from NYC

Looking for culture and a quick getaway? Look no further

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The top five New York art shows this week

Check out our art critic's suggestions for the best art exhibitions

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New York's most important new artists

Get to know a crop of talented twentysomethings

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The best art exhibitions to see this summer

As the art world starts to wind down, there’s still plenty to see at New York's best museums and galleries

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Must-see art exhibitions

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Top art this week

With an art scene as prominent and ever-changing as New York’s, you don’t want to miss these essential exhibitions.

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Time Out's picks

The best art shows in New York, as chosen by Time Out's critics.

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Current art exhibition reviews

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“Frederick Sommer: Glue Drawings”

Frederick Sommer (1905–1999) is most famous for his photographs from the 1940s that combine Surrealism’s uncanniness with taut formalism: abstracted horizonless, pictures of the American desert; studies of animal carcasses; portraits of his neighbors (including Max Ernst) in Prescott, Arizona; and arrangements of chicken entrails or found objects. But he also worked in other mediums, including drawing, painting and “cameraless” photography. Sommer’s small-scale drawings, made with colored glue on black paper, date mostly from the 1950s and roam from calligraphic to cartoonish to biomorphic. Many echo his earlier photographs. A collection of meandering lines and watery blobs recall his still lifes of poultry parts. A grouping of brown, gray and gold amoeba-like shapes, sprouting limblike protrusions, resemble pictures of dead coyotes desiccated by the sun. Rounding out the show are examples of Sommer’s later set-up photographs. Employing cut paper and accordion-folded reproductions of Durer engravings, they anticipate the work of such contemporary artists as Eileen Quinlan. Neither they nor the glue drawings have the force and finish of Sommer’s greatest photographs. But they’re wonderfully of apiece with them and with the artist’s singular, consistent and encompassing vision.—Anne Doran

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Art

Michael Heizer, “Altars”

While the counterculture’s back-to-the-land dreams proved fleeting, a group of ’60s artists pursuing a radical vision had better luck, journeying west to create convention-defying Earthworks. Known for his hermitlike practice, Michael Heizer is one of the genre’s biggest names. After years working on a sort of futurist Tikal in the Nevada desert, Heizer here offers huge boulders levitated into wall niches, and monumental, painted-steel platforms supporting contoured forms. The last resemble bones, and given their title, “Altars,” they suggest sacrificial offerings: an apt metaphor for an artist who’s given everything for his art.—Howard Halle

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Art

"Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks"

While it may be a cliché, Jean-Michel Basquiat was the embodiment of an artist who who lived fast, died young and left a beautiful corpse. He perished at age 27 of a heroin overdose, and ascended into legend, becoming the subject of movie about his life and a household name alongside that of his friend, Andy Warhol. Before all that, there was his meteoric rise as a graffiti artist who rocketed to art-world stardom. He wasn’t some talentless fluke who managed to con the right people, either: His paintings—ferociously packed with imagery and texts, and crackling with street smart insights—have stood the test of time.The seeming spontaneity of his work was one of its hallmarks, but in truth, they were a lot more thought out than some people might imagine. That’s one revelation of the Brooklyn Museum’s "Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks,” which presents the Brooklyn native’s previously unseen sketches and writings, some 160 pages in all. The show also includes examples of his poetry, demonstrating that he was just as interested in the word as he was in the brush. All in all the show provides a fascinating look into the creative process of an artistic icon.

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Blog

Review: The Whitney opens its new home with a survey of American Art

A new home purpose-built to kick major institutional ass

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Upcoming art exhibitions

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“The Rise of Sneaker Culture”

Like blue jeans, sneakers have become ubiquitous, must-have accessory around the globe. were a largely American phenomenon that conquered apparel and fashion. The Brooklyn Museum retraces the history of kicks, from their emergence in early 20th-century to the present.

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Art

“Folk Art and American Modernism”

Stylistic borrowings from outsider art have become something of a vogue among contemporary painters, but it is hardly a new phenomenon. Self-taught artists have long exerted a pull on Modern Art, especially in the United States, where folk traditions have played a large role in the nation’s cultural life. Their impact on early-20th-century American art is revealed here, in a presentation of folk art owned by artists such as Elie Nadelman, Yasuo Kuniyoshi and Charles Sheeler, along with the works inspired by those objects.

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Art

“Picasso Sculpture”

Picasso trained as a painter, yet his forays into sculpture produced some of the most groundbreaking art of the 20th-century. Works like Guitar, with its open construction of planar forms, and Absinthe Glass, with its addition of a real example of the sieved spoon used to pour the wormwood concoction over a lump of sugar (the preferred method for drinking it), anticipated Constructivism and Duchamp’s Readymade. That fact that Picasso was essential self-taught as a sculptor liberated him think outside the box. This show surveys his career-long engagement with the medium he transformed.

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Art

Joaquín Torres-García

Modern art from Latin American is still underappreciated in the United States. MoMA, however, was a pioneer in promoting modernists from the region, and this look back at the work of Uruguayan artist Joaquín Torres-García (1874–1949) certainly fits in that tradition. One of South America’s most important figures, Torres-García developed a style indebted to Klee, Magritte, Míro and Mondrian. His paintings in particular distilled these disparate influences into overall compositions featuring geometric forms and flattened figurative outlines arranged in syncopated patterns. His subjects included cityscapes, which were sometimes reduced to surreal jumbles of glyphs, or empty compartmentalized niches. Surreal and timeless as tomb paintings, Torres-García's work certainly deserve admittance into the MoMA canon.

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Most popular art stories

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Teresita Fernández recounts her remarkable public art career

The artist explains her new MSG installation

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Where to see the best outdoor art this summer

With warm weather finally here, there’s no better time to get outdoors and interact with art

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Art

View Martin Scorsese's collection of movie posters

The iconic director presents cool, classic flyers for his favorite films at MoMA

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Photos from the Botanical Garden's Frida Kahlo exhibition

The show pays tribute to the iconic artist's deep appreciation for nature

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Best art galleries in New York

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Best Chelsea galleries

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Best art galleries on the Lower East Side

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Best photography galleries

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Best art galleries on 57th Street

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Latest art news

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Headed for Mars? Check out what might be on the menu

Two artists are pondering just that in a show at Williamsburg’s Pierogi Gallery

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Jenny Holzer lights up the Botanical Garden

Holzer will intersect with one of art history’s icons

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Whitney hangs Pollock sideways: Bonehead move or revisionist argument?

As if the Whitney hasn't called enough attention to itself with the opening of its new building...

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New Bowery wall mural goes up with Old Glory and baby Hulk onboard

The image features the Stars and Stripes, with each star overlaid by a skull and each stripe made up as a band of English’s advertising parodies

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New York art in pictures

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The top 50 New York photographs

We round up iconic depictions of NYC moments high and low

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Mary Ellen Mark’s best NYC street photography

To honor Mark and her work, we take a look back at her most stunning New York-set shots

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See photos from Justin Bettman’s amazing #SetintheStreet

Get your photograph taken at this Times Square installation

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See classic photos of the Lower East Side’s ‘90s squatter population

Photographer Ash Thayer’s images of a more Bohemian Manhattan reveal New York life in an edgier time

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Best museums in New York

Museums

Whitney Museum of American Art

Like the Guggenheim, the Whitney Museum is set apart by its unique architecture

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Museums

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Hang out in an Egyptian temple, gawk at period costumes and take pictures on the gorgeous rooftop garden

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Museums

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim Museum is as famous for its landmark building as it is for its impressive collection and daring temporary shows

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Museums

The American Museum of Natural History

No matter which wing you wander through or where your curiosities lie, it’s hard to explore without being awestruck

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