Art

Art galleries, exhibitions and reviews of the latest and best art in New York

Art

Check out the top 25 sculptures at MoMA

Take our tour of the works that wrote the book on modern and contemporary art in 3-D

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Art

Behold these stunning views of NYC

Photographer Michael Tischler lights up the city with his uncanny photos

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The top five New York art shows this week

Check out our art critic's suggestions for the best art exhibitions

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The 20 best-selling postcards from NYC's top museums

Here are the best postcards, according to people who visit the Guggenheim, the Met, MoMA and the Whitney

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Must-see art exhibitions

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Top art this week

With an art scene as prominent and ever-changing as New York’s, you don’t want to miss these essential exhibitions.

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Time Out's picks

The best art shows in New York, as chosen by Time Out's critics.

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Best free art in NYC

Looking for some free things to do, art enthusiasts? Thought so.

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Current art exhibition reviews

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“Sarah Charlesworth: Doubleworld”

Like her better-known colleagues Cindy Sherman and Richard Prince Sarah Charlesworth (1947–2013) was a key member of the Pictures Generation. Like them, she emerged in the late 1970s to dissect the workings of images—photographs, in particular—within popular culture. This small but punchy retrospective—astoundingly, her first in New York—opens with a room of her early “Stills,” a series of large, cropped and grainy blowups of newspaper photos, capturing people falling from buildings. The serial arrangement of these shocking pictures into a dispassionate typology reveal roots in ’60s and ’70s Conceptual Art, but their charged emotional content and interest in the conventions of media representation mark them as harbingers of Postmodernism. The artist’s best known series, “Objects of Desire” from the mid-1980s, isolates found images against glossy monochromatic backgrounds with matching frames. One diptych, Figures, pairs a bodiless 1940s evening gown with a prone woman mummified in S&M bondage gear, creating a concise feminist critique of Hollywood glamor and fetishism. In later years, Charlesworth began taking her own photos, with arguably even more incisive results. Untitled (Voyeur), from the 1995 series “Doubleworld,” pictures a phallic brass telescope gently penetrating a pair of slightly parted red velvet drapes: a history of vision and optics recast as a wryly gendered send-up. Her last works, the 2012 “Available Light” series, present spare, limpid still lifes on th

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Art

Niele Toroni

A conceptual artist who’s spent the past 50 years painting the same repeating marks in a variety of formats, Niele Toroni rarely shows in New York. This career survey is his first here in 25 years. As usual, the work consists of strokes made with a No. 50 brush spaced 30 centimeters apart. They’re applied to fabric, canvas and paper, as well as on the gallery’s walls and windows. Toroni’s roll of waxed canvas from 1968 displays hundreds of orange brushstrokes on the titular material, running down the wall onto a platform. Similarly, 25 paintings, from 1987, presents 25 compositions wrapping around the space, each a 39-square-inch canvas covered with precisely 14 brushstrokes. Still, Toroni’s site-specific “interventions”(a pyramid of black brushstrokes above an entryway, a series in blue on an electrical panel door and three Zen imprints in white on a window) are the main attraction. They provide the icing on the cake for an exhibit made compelling by its deceptive simplicity.—Paul Laster

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“Albert Oehlen: Home and Garden”

Painting may be a going concern, but it’s still being contested. The writings of critics such as Peter Schjeldahl and Dave Hickey are filled with sentiments like, Painting is alive, just not important, anymore, or, Painting is like jazz, an obsolete genre people still like to play, notions undoubtedly shared by others. If nothing else, this NewMu survey of Albert Oehlen confirms that doubts about paintings’s efficacy have been internalized by its practitioners. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Oehlen was part of the rambunctious Cologne scene of the ’80s and ’90s, whose capo, Martin Kippenberger, led a reaction against German Neo-Expressionism. Oehlen’s approach was to make road kill out of Neo-Ex pretensions: His canvases treat color, gesture and form like messes left by the roadside. He upped the ante by being among the first artists to put digital imagery and printing to canvas, as if to say, Who needs a brush? (A subversion subverted here by eight-byte doodles in black-and-white, meticulously enlarged by hand). Stomping on painting while taking pleasure in it, Oehlen deflects the medium’s naysayers by appearing to join their ranks. —Howard Halle

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Art

“Stanley Whitney: Dance the Orange”

In 1981, abstract painter Stanley Whitney’s work was included in a group show at the Studio Museum in Harlem. Now, 34 years later, he is having his first New York solo museum exhibition there. The 28 luxuriant paintings on paper and canvas on view—all made between 2008 and 2015—are the best of his career. In the mid-1990s, Whitney arrived at a simple format that’s served him ever since, and to which all the canvases (and most of the works on paper) in this show adhere: A loosely constructed grid of richly hued blocks separated by narrower bands of color. In some works, the former intrude on latter from either side, suggesting a continuation of the rows into a space beyond the painting. The brushwork, when visible at all, is unfussy and workmanlike; the colors and their arrangement are the main event. Working without a preconceived plan, Whitney starts each painting with a single block of color in the top left-hand corner. Moving from left to right and from top to bottom, he fills in the rest, finishing at the bottom right corner. This initial pass seems relaxed and, at the same time, always alert to its own progress. Later, the artist will go back, adjusting the color and treatment of certain blocks and bands. Whitney’s variations on his theme can be as flamboyant as Elephant Memory (2014), dominated by cherry red and chartreuse, or as plain-spoken as Off Minor (2014), which starts off, like the beginning of a sentence, with a black square, then a white one, before embarki

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Upcoming art exhibitions

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Richard Haines: A Room of One's Own

The whimsical designer and fashion illustrator showcases his playful menswear sketches and his adoringly drawn nudes at Daniel Cooney Fine Art.

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“Picasso Sculpture”

Picasso trained as a painter, yet his forays into sculpture produced some of the most groundbreaking art of the 20th-century. Works like Guitar, with its open construction of planar forms, and Absinthe Glass, with its addition of a real example of the sieved spoon used to pour the wormwood concoction over a lump of sugar (the preferred method for drinking it), anticipated Constructivism and Duchamp’s Readymade. That fact that Picasso was essential self-taught as a sculptor liberated him think outside the box. This show surveys his career-long engagement with the medium he transformed.

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Art

Joaquín Torres-García

Modern art from Latin American is still underappreciated in the United States. MoMA, however, was a pioneer in promoting modernists from the region, and this look back at the work of Uruguayan artist Joaquín Torres-García (1874–1949) certainly fits in that tradition. One of South America’s most important figures, Torres-García developed a style indebted to Klee, Magritte, Míro and Mondrian. His paintings in particular distilled these disparate influences into overall compositions featuring geometric forms and flattened figurative outlines arranged in syncopated patterns. His subjects included cityscapes, which were sometimes reduced to surreal jumbles of glyphs, or empty compartmentalized niches. Surreal and timeless as tomb paintings, Torres-García's work certainly deserve admittance into the MoMA canon.

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Where to see the best outdoor art this summer

There’s no better time to get outdoors and interact with art in the city

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Most popular art stories

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The 100 best paintings in New York

Leading artists, gallery owners, curators and critics pick the best paintings to be seen in NYC

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New York's quirkiest museums

Check out these oddities in the city’s strangest and perhaps most interesting museums and attractions

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Check out these never-before-seen photos of Keith Haring

Newly unearthed images offer candid views of the street artist who became an art world legend

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Check out the top 12 lobby artworks in NYC

You'll be amazed at the hidden art treasures that can be found in the Gotham's buildings, bars and restaurants

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Best art galleries in New York

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Best Chelsea galleries

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Best art galleries on the Lower East Side

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Best photography galleries

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Best art galleries on 57th Street

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Latest art news

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Canine connoisseur does not sniff at contemporary art

Meet Pickles, a French bulldog who is a regular presence on the art scene

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See street-art on storefront security gates that are completely legal

Street-art murals are popping up on security gates all over the Lower East Side

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Blog

TWA Terminal building will be turned into a hotel

JFK’s landmarked terminal will be repurposed as the TWA Flight Center Hotel

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Blog

Giant Bagels have taken over Greenwich Village and Hudson River Park

The work consists of giant bagels arranged into stacks

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New York art in pictures

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The top 50 New York photographs

We round up iconic depictions of NYC moments high and low

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Mary Ellen Mark’s best NYC street photography

To honor Mark and her work, we take a look back at her most stunning New York-set shots

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See photos from Justin Bettman’s amazing #SetintheStreet

Get your photograph taken at this Times Square installation

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See classic photos of the Lower East Side’s ‘90s squatter population

Photographer Ash Thayer’s images of a more Bohemian Manhattan reveal New York life in an edgier time

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Best museums in New York

Museums

Whitney Museum of American Art

Like the Guggenheim, the Whitney Museum is set apart by its unique architecture

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Hang out in an Egyptian temple, gawk at period costumes and take pictures on the gorgeous rooftop garden

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Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim Museum is as famous for its landmark building as it is for its impressive collection and daring temporary shows

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The American Museum of Natural History

No matter which wing you wander through or where your curiosities lie, it’s hard to explore without being awestruck

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