Art

Art galleries, exhibitions and reviews of the latest and best art in New York

Art

“Fever Within: The Art of Ronald Lockett”

Working without formal training, Ronald Lockett borrowed from traditional black Southern art forms

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Read more

Must-see art exhibitions

Art

Top art this week

With an art scene as prominent and ever-changing as New York’s, you don’t want to miss these essential exhibitions.

Read more
Art

Time Out's picks

The best art shows in New York, as chosen by Time Out's critics.

Read more
Art

Best free art in NYC

Looking for some free things to do, art enthusiasts? Thought so.

Read more
See more of the best art exhibitions

Current art exhibition reviews

Art

“Intimisms”

One useful service offered by summer group exhibitions is the chance to try something a bit more easygoing in the absence of high-season pressure. “Intimisms” is a splendid example, a warm and likeable selection of figurative paintings and drawings that riffs on the legacy of the Intimists, a group of turn-of-the-20th-century artists known for its loving embrace of the domestic and the familial. Co-organized by artist Aliza Nisenbaum—and inspired in part by critic and curator Chris Sharp’s essay on her work—the 26-artist show presents a relaxed and richly human study of the range of moods and meanings to be found in that special personal connection between artist and subject. Where Sharp points to the fragile status of intimacy today, describing it, rather acidly, as “won through the increasingly rare act of paying attention,” the artists in “Intimisms” focus on moments that, while often fleeting and humble, manage nonetheless to take up residence in the memory. Very often, this involves the subtle physical and psychological interactions of figures with interiors. Original Intimist Pierre Bonnard’s mid-1920s paintings of his wife, Marthe, in the bath are perhaps the best known examples; they’re echoed in this show by other nude studies such as Sylvia Sleigh’s Max with Angels (1999) and Lucian Freud’s typically exquisite Small Figure (1983–84), as well as by Louis Eilshemius’s much earlier (and rather eerie) Untitled (Nude at Bath) (1917). In other works, intimacy is conveye

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more
Art

Mr., “Sunset in My Heart”

The Japanese artist known only as Mr. claims that the 2011 Tohoku earthquake exercised a deep impact on his practice, prompting him to move away from a preoccupation with the sexualized aspects of manga culture toward a more nuanced emotional and political approach. But there’s little evidence of any such let’s-get-serious reappraisal in Mr.’s latest New York outing, which the artist—dressed as a uniformed schoolgirl—launched with a discordant bout of sake-fueled karaoke. In 11 new paintings, Mr. stirs his familiar saucer-eyed cuties into a multicolored abstract and typographic stew that suggests a continued escape into pubescence. Which isn’t to say that Mr. hasn’t tried to evolve beyond the Superflat aesthetic of his mentor, Takashi Murakami, who’s been dubbed the “Warhol of Japan.” While the latter is known for the Koonsian slickness of his ultra-high-end productions, Mr.’s work is distinguished by the use of dirty, distressed canvases, patched together in homage to Arte Povera and its veneration of the everyday. Given that Mr. frames his cartoonish Pop tarts as universal emissaries of hope, such humble backdrops seem appropriate; whether the ill-proportioned characters that populate them necessarily live up to Mr.’s claims is another matter.

Time Out says
  • 2 out of 5 stars
Read more
Art

Dan Burkhart

Having shown in Los Angeles in the early 1980s, Dan Burkhart moved to New York, hoping to build on his early success. But his rich and strange romantic-symbolist brew was out of step with cooler contemporary sensibilities, and he remains a lesser-known gem; this exhibition marks his first solo appearance in the city in 22 years. Contextualizing his recent output with a couple of large early canvases, Burkhart presents an array of paintings, sculptures and hybrids of the two that usher the viewer into an eerie world of shadowy half shapes and queasy biomorphisms. In the paintings Dream of Prague (1975), Vwaga (1980), and Catalonics VI (2011–16), objects and part objects loom out of a lush darkness, hinting at Lovecraftian horror, but never quite cohere into anything readily describable. The heavily varnished surfaces of the works look sticky to the touch, with the paint applied underneath in slabs of meaty impasto or as tormented swirls. Meanwhile, the likes of Sculpture Painting No. 155 and No. 158 (both 2011–16) suggest an angry boil and a patch of mold, respectively. A litany of maverick talents from Hans Bellmer to Albert Pinkham-Ryder comes to mind when appraising Burkhart’s work, but there is no doubt that his vision remains unique.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
Read more
Art

“Stuart Davis: In Full Swing”

As generally understood, the history of 20th-century art in America is treated like a Superman epic in which a mild-mannered provincial backwater transforms itself into the heroic art capital of the world. There is some truth to this: Thanks to its overwhelming triumph in 1945, the United States became the world’s most powerful nation—and, as we all know, history is written by the victors, and that includes art history. But this story, like so many, tends to miss the nuances that drove developments. With its survey of Stuart Davis (1892–1964), the Whitney fills in an important blank. Davis was born into an artistic family: His father was art editor of The Philadelphia Press and his mother a sculptor. Both were personally acquainted with the painters of the Ashcan School, and Davis’s childhood exposure to their stylistic mix of Impressionism and Social Realism led him to study with Robert Henri, one of the movement’s key figures. Two developments, however, altered the course of Davis’s career. The first was the famed Armory Show of 1913, where the young Davis encountered Fauvism and Cubism. The second was the rise of the first true consumer economy after World War I. The former provided him a stylistic template, while the latter, in the form of advertising, household products and other Jazz Age enticements, served as inspiration. Davis Americanized European modernism by combining it with the syncopated cultural rhythms and nascent pop culture of the Roaring ’20s. Cubism con

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Read more

Upcoming art exhibitions

Art

“Bruce Conner: It’s All True”

Conner (1933–2008) is among the most important postwar artists you’ve probably never heard of. A pioneer of the West Coast scene and an early practitioner of found-object assemblage, he delved into rise of consumerist culture and fears of nuclear armageddon during the height of the Cold War. His work encompasses painting painting, sculpture, photography, performance and film. With respect to the last, his 1958 classic, A Movie, employed rapid-edit montages of appropriated TV commercials and movie footage put to an musical soundtrack; the darkly ironic result was startlingly ahead of it time. This show—the artist’s first monographic museum exhibition in New York, the first large survey of his work in 16 years and the first complete retrospective of his 50-year career—brings together over 250 examples of his groundbreaking work.

Read more
Art

“The Keeper”

This show unpacks the impulse to collect in all of its manifestations, from proper institutional holdings to obsessive individual hoarding. Assemblages, imaginary museums and other works explore the mechanics of display while pondering what is worth hanging on to and what is not.

Read more
Art

Kai Althoff

A dreamy, surreal amalgam of Expressionist and Symbolist tropes characterizes the art of this German artist who works in multiple mediums, including ceramics, weaving, drawing, painting and sculpture. His creations range from discrete objects to room-size installations that seem to grow out of the artist’s fantasies, reveries and personal memories. The term unique is too often applied to artists, but in the case of Althoff’s oeuvre, the label fits perfectly. Some 200 works spanning Althoff’s career is brought together in this survey, his first in an American museum.

Read more
Art

Agnes Martin

Along with Georgia O’Keeffe, Martin (1912–2004) is arguably the most important women artists in American art history, and certainly one of the most important painters of the 20th century, period. Her compositions utilized geometric grids, bands and lines, usually rendered in soft, subtle colors to create diaphanous objects of contemplation. She’s usually hailed as a forerunner of Minimalism, but she considered herself an Abstract Expression, who, like Barnett Newman, meditated on the nature of vision and perception. This retrospective is the first comprehensive career survey since her death.

Read more

Most popular art stories

Art

Artist Jim Shaw talks sexy tinker bell and The Seven Deadly sins

With his first NYC retrospective at the New Museum, the L.A. artist talks about his visionary work

Read more
Art

Check out the top 25 sculptures at MoMA

Take our tour of the works that wrote the book on modern and contemporary art in 3-D

Read more
Art

The 100 best paintings in New York

Leading artists, gallery owners, curators and critics pick the best paintings to be seen in NYC

Read more
Art

New York's quirkiest museums

Check out these oddities in the city’s strangest and perhaps most interesting museums and attractions

Read more

Best art galleries in New York

Art

Best Chelsea galleries

Read more
Art

Best art galleries on the Lower East Side

Read more
Art

Best photography galleries

Read more
Art

Best art galleries on 57th Street

Read more
See more New York art galleries

Latest art news

Blog

David Bowie's massive art collection comes to NY

The art of The Man Who Sold the World's is up for sale

Read more
Blog

Artists who’ve repurposed Trump bus as art are bringing it to Brooklyn

Artists Mary Mihelic and David Gleeson bought Trump's old campagin bus on Craigslist and turned it into art

Read more
Blog

Twelve Chuck Close mosaics will grace the Second Avenue Subway

The MTA has commissioned artist Chuck Close to create 12 mosaics for the new line’s stop at 86th Street

Read more
Blog

You can take a selfie in front of vintage NYC photos at the Museum of The City of New York

Have you ever wanted to go back in time and experience the New York of 50, 75 or 100 years ago, revisiting places like Times Square, Coney Island and the Brooklyn Bridge as they once were? Well, you can. Sort of. As part of its “Lost in Old New York” exhibition of vintage NYC photos, the Museum of The City of New York has set up enlarged versions of some of the images from the show as selfie backdrops for visitors. Take a picture of yourself strolling past the window at Bergdorf Goodman around mid-century, or at Coney circa 1900. If you post the result on social media, you’ll have a chance to win a free membership to the museum. Check out some examples below. The past is beckoning, so go get lost in it.     Did you come and get #LostinOldNY this weekend? Our Director of Exhibitions Installation traveled back to the original Penn Station to admire the Beaux-Arts architecture. Our first floor is now filled with scenes of New York City as it was way back when, and you can put yourself into them! Why not visit the newly opened Brooklyn Bridge? Or the 1939 World's Fair? Thanks to the magic of #LostinOldNY you can! Plus if you post your image using #LostinOldNY you’ll be entered into a monthly drawing for a free museum membership! A photo posted by Museum of the City of New York (@museumofcityny) on May 31, 2016 at 5:15am PDT   I think this is what they call vintage shopping. #lostinoldny #vintage #bergdorfgoodman A photo posted by Jennifer Bautista (@jenn.baut

Read more
See more on the blog

New York art in pictures

Art

The top 50 New York photographs

We round up iconic depictions of NYC moments high and low

Read more
Art

Mary Ellen Mark’s best NYC street photography

To honor Mark and her work, we take a look back at her most stunning New York-set shots

Read more
Art

See photos from Justin Bettman’s amazing #SetintheStreet

Get your photograph taken at this Times Square installation

Read more
Art

See classic photos of the Lower East Side’s ‘90s squatter population

Photographer Ash Thayer’s images of a more Bohemian Manhattan reveal New York life in an edgier time

Read more

Best museums in New York

Museums

Whitney Museum of American Art

Read more
Museums

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Read more
Museums

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Read more
Museums

The American Museum of Natural History

Read more
See more New York museums