Art

Art galleries, exhibitions and reviews of the latest and best art in New York

Art

Photos from the Botanical Garden's extravagant Frida Kahlo exhibition

The New York Botanical Garden pays tribute to the iconic artist's deep appreciation for nature

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Art

The top five New York art shows this week

Check out our art critic's suggestions for the best art exhibitions you don’t want to miss

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Art

Where to see the best outdoor art this summer

With warm weather finally here, there’s no better time to get outdoors and interact with art

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Art

View the Met’s new rooftop commission

Pierre Huyghe’s minimalist installation is part zen, part mystifying and has great Central Park views

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Art

The best contemporary paintings now on view in NYC art galleries

This month, galleries in New York are offering a cornucopia of artists and styles in contemporary painting

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Must-see art exhibitions

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Top art this week

With an art scene as prominent and ever-changing as New York’s, you don’t want to miss these essential exhibitions.

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Art

Time Out's picks

The best art shows in New York, as chosen by Time Out's critics.

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Art

Best free art in NYC

Looking for some free things to do, art enthusiasts? Thought so.

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Current art exhibition reviews

Art

Rosy Keyser, "The Hell Bitch"

The paintings in this excellent solo show, Keyser’s first at Maccarone, are clearly indebted to Philip Guston’s abstractions, Robert Rauschenberg’s combines and Eva Hesse’s rope works, among other works from the past. For the most part, they wear their influences well. The exhibition opens with the medium-sized canvas Bird of Paradise, a dark mass of fabric, paint, mica and silky fringe. Calling to mind a shadowy patch of undergrowth, it is beautiful, irritable and distinctly feminine in the manner of Joan Mitchell. In contrast, the airy, frenetic Music for a Drowned World is a ten-foot-long stretcher on which only a couple of large swags of canvas remain, with the rest of the painting’s space crisscrossed by webs of paint-soaked fringe topped by a twisted length of silvery metal corner bead. Such real-world materials regularly take the place of paint in Keyser’s works, as in the nicely off-kilter Mi Tata(Drug Mule), which contains a disarticulated wood bead seat cover. Less successful are two new diagrammatic wall sculptures made from welded square steel tubing and sand bags, but they show the artist moving in a new and potentially rewarding direction. The title of the exhibition comes from the artist’s name for a canvas she keeps in her studio to test materials and techniques on—a “living palette” something like a petri dish. Knowing this makes one want to see more of that private experimentation made public, as in the works here, which flirt with failure to great effect.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Blog

Review: The Whitney opens its new home with a survey of American Art

A new home purpose-built to kick major institutional ass

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Art

"Björk"

I can’t say I’ve been a fan of Björk’s music, but I’ve been impressed with the way she’s minted pop stardom out of artsy weirdness. And I mean committed artsy weirdness: Lady Gaga appeared at the Oscars in a conventional gown, after all, while Björk charged it in a swan dress. So let’s concede that Björk conforms to some received image of an “artist.” Does she deserve a retrospective at the Modern? That’s a matter of opinion, though for MoMA, casting itself as the Amazon of museum tourism, a no-brainer. The only problem: Her show is a dud. At its center are Björk’s music videos playing in darkened rooms, including Black Lake, commissioned by MoMA. Projected on facing screens, it is, like the rest of Björk’s oeuvre, visually and sonically out-there. But while billing itself as an “immersive” environment, it’s still just a promo for a song. By comparison, Michael Jackson’s Disney spectacle, Captain EO, was a paragon of outside-the-box thinking. Practically speaking, museum presentations of videos created as single-channel pieces—music videos among them—are limited. They’re designed to be watched, which doesn’t comport with the usual gallery experience of walking around and engaging with stuff. This is where the show reveals a criminal lapse of imagination. Instead of Björk’s usual envelope-pushing, the exhibition saddles viewers with a Costume Institute display of outfits and props associated with her greatest hits. A sort of iPod thingamajig offers a playlist that automatic

Time Out says
  • 1 out of 5 stars
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Art

"Judith Scott—Bound and Unbound"

The artist Judith Scott (1943–2005), born deaf and with Down syndrome, was the author of a body of extraordinary abstract fiber sculptures, which she made during the last 18 years of her life. Some 60 of Scott’s pieces are being shown at the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, and in Scott’s case, the choice of venue is as important as the work itself. Scott usually began with one or more found objects—an electric fan, a picture frame, a bundle of sticks—that she’d then wrap in yarn, string, fabric strips and other materials such as candy wrappers and plastic tubing. The final, cocoonlike forms are often organic and crystalline at once, with bulges resulting from successive layers of padding, and faceted effects produced by the line of knots that Scott used when changing colors or joining one part to another. Forms might be open or closed. One creation, executed mostly in shades of turquoise, sports a series of exuberant, intersecting loops. Another is a gray-green ovoid with blues and pinks streaking one side. Her color sense was sophisticated and grew more so over time—most notably in a late work featuring a tangle of bluish-white plastic hose bound together with yarn dyed blue, orange, olive, lime and ocher. Scott’s art is original, powerful and consistent. It evolved over the course of her life and is of its own time. This show positions Scott and her oeuvre in the context of the feminist movement, and by doing so, has far-reaching implications

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Upcoming art exhibitions

Art

“Zoe Leonard: Analogue"

This ambitious project made up of both color and black-and-white photos was created over a ten year period, and takes its cues from Eugène Atget’s iconic documentation of ancient Parisian neighborhoods disappearing under the onslaught of modernization. In similar fashion, Leonard used a vintage Rolleiflex camera to capture vanishing mom-and-pop enterprises. Starting out in her East Village neighborhood, Leonard expanded her search to include storefronts in Eastern Europe, Africa, Cuba and Mexico, with an eye towards the colorful hand-made signage distinguishing each place. A subset of shots picture businesses selling Kodak film, with the brand’s distinctive yellow-and-red logo emblazoned on awnings, door frames and window displays. These last images nod to Leonard’s title and its reference to a film medium that is itself becoming obsolete thanks to digital photography.

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Art

“Picasso Sculpture”

Picasso trained as a painter, yet his forays into sculpture produced some of the most groundbreaking art of the 20th-century. Works like Guitar, with its open construction of planar forms, and Absinthe Glass, with its addition of a real example of the sieved spoon used to pour the wormwood concoction over a lump of sugar (the preferred method for drinking it), anticipated Constructivism and Duchamp’s Readymade. That fact that Picasso was essential self-taught as a sculptor liberated him think outside the box. This show surveys his career-long engagement with the medium he transformed.

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Art

Joaquín Torres-García

Modern art from Latin American is still underappreciated in the United States. MoMA, however, was a pioneer in promoting modernists from the region, and this look back at the work of Uruguayan artist Joaquín Torres-García (1874–1949) certainly fits in that tradition. One of South America’s most important figures, Torres-García developed a style indebted to Klee, Magritte, Míro and Mondrian. His paintings in particular distilled these disparate influences into overall compositions featuring geometric forms and flattened figurative outlines arranged in syncopated patterns. His subjects included cityscapes, which were sometimes reduced to surreal jumbles of glyphs, or empty compartmentalized niches. Surreal and timeless as tomb paintings, Torres-García's work certainly deserve admittance into the MoMA canon.

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Art

Upcoming summer exhibitions

With warm weather finally here, there’s no better time to get outdoors and interact with art

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Most popular art stories

Art

Preview the Botanical Garden's extravagant Frida Kahlo exhibition

The New York Botanical Garden pays tribute to the iconic artist's deep appreciation for nature

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Art

A fascinating look at the early years of Andy Warhol

Learn how Andrew Warhola became Andy Warhol, and discover his early works at MoMA's latest installation

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Art

See photos of the brand new Whitney Museum

Investigate the Whitney’s latest incarnation, boasting 63,000 square feet of space across eight floors in its new home

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Art

Lisa Yuskavage previews her latest paintings

Lisa Yuskavage’s newest paintings and pastels take viewers on a love-generation trip back to the garden

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Best art galleries in New York

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Best Chelsea galleries

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Best art galleries on the Lower East Side

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Best photography galleries

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Best art galleries on 57th Street

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Latest art news

Blog

Whitney hangs Pollock sideways: Bonehead move or revisionist argument?

As if the Whitney hasn't called enough attention to itself with the opening of its new building...

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Blog

New Bowery wall mural goes up with Old Glory and baby Hulk onboard

The image features the Stars and Stripes, with each star overlaid by a skull and each stripe made up as a band of English’s advertising parodies

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Blog

Harlem art fair launches the same week as Frieze New York

Frieze New York is hosting its 3rd edition on Randall's Island May 14–17

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Blog

Cool off and chill out with water walled rooms and more at Brooklyn Bridge Park

Warm weather means sunny days in the park, green grass, and, at Brooklyn Bridge Park anyway, interactive public art

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New York art in pictures

Art

See photos from Justin Bettman’s amazing #SetintheStreet

Get your photograph taken at this Times Square installation

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Art

See classic photos of the Lower East Side’s ‘90s squatter population

Photographer Ash Thayer’s images of a more Bohemian Manhattan reveal New York life in an edgier time

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Art

NYC’s art world: The Mad Men years

In art as in advertising, the ’60s were tumultuous and transformational.

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Art

A guide to the Italian Futurism art movement

From its radical beginnings to its fascist incarnation, Italian Futurism shocked the world.

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Best museums in New York

Museums

Whitney Museum of American Art

Like the Guggenheim, the Whitney Museum is set apart by its unique architecture

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Museums

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Hang out in an Egyptian temple, gawk at period costumes and take pictures on the gorgeous rooftop garden

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Museums

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim Museum is as famous for its landmark building as it is for its impressive collection and daring temporary shows

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Museums

The American Museum of Natural History

No matter which wing you wander through or where your curiosities lie, it’s hard to explore without being awestruck

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