Free museum days in NYC

Keep this list of free admission times and pay-what-you-wish hours handy and see New York's best cultural institutions for nothing

Photograph: Peter Aaron
Museum of the Moving Image

New York City is chock full of great museums which feed your curious mind for free. Whether you're planning an awesome city staycation, looking for cool things to do this weekend, or you're just a thrifty culture vulture, there's a great upcoming free exhibition to suit every interest and budget. Here's our guide, organized by day.

Friday

American Folk Art Museum

As its name suggests, the American Folk Art Museum celebrates traditional craft-based work. Located in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, the museum's unparalleled holdings in folk and outsider artworks make it one of the city's outstanding cultural centers. Free family guides are available at the admission desk, and on the first Saturday of most months, the museum hosts a family tour and workshop free with admission. Free admission daily.

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Upper West Side Free

Asia Society

Asia Society sponsors study missions and conferences while promoting public programs in the U.S. and abroad. The headquarters’ striking galleries host major exhibitions of art culled from dozens of countries and time periods—from ancient India and medieval Persia to contemporary Japan—and assembled from public and private collections, including the permanent Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller III collection of Asian art. A spacious, atriumlike café serves a Pan-Asian menu, and the beautifully stocked gift shop makes the organization a one-stop destination for anyone who has an interest in Asian art and culture. Free Fri 6–9pm.

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Lenox Hill

Bronx Museum of the Arts

Founded in 1971 and featuring more than 1000 works, this multicultural art museum shines a spotlight on 20th- and 21st-century artists who are either Bronx-based or of African, Asian or Latino ancestry. The museum sporadically offers family programming. Free admission daily.

Read more
The Bronx Free

Center for Jewish History/Yeshiva University Museum

Presenting a collection of more than 8,000 artifacts, four galleries and an outdoor sculpture garden, this historic site offers everything from folk art to Jewish ceremonial objects. Among its many highlights include Bronze Age to Late Antique period archaeological artifacts, Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten letter from 1818 establishing religious freedom and clothing, and accessories from around the world. Free Mon, Wed 5-8pm; Fri 11am–2:30pm.

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Flatiron

Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

After a two-year redesign by Japanese architect Yoshio Taniguchi, MoMA reopened in 2004 with almost double the space to display some of the most impressive artworks from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. Outside, the Philip Johnson–designed Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden (which houses works by Calder, Rodin and Moore) overlooks the Modern, a sleek, high-end restaurant and bar run by superstar restaurateur Danny Meyer. MoMA has a great deal of free family programming for all ages. Free Fri 4–8pm.

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Midtown West

The Museum at FIT

The Fashion Institute of Technology owns one of the largest and most impressive collections of clothing, textiles and accessories in the world, including some 50,000 costumes and fabrics dating from the 18th century to the present. Overseen by fashion historian Dr. Valerie Steele, the museum showcases a selection from the permanent collection, as well as temporary exhibitions focusing on individual designers or the role fashion plays in society. Free admission daily.

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Midtown West Free

Museum of the Moving Image

Only 15 minutes from midtown, the Museum of the Moving Image is one of the city’s most dynamic institutions. Rubbing elbows with Kaufman Astoria Studios, its three-story extension features a state-of-the-art 267-seat cinema and expanded gallery spaces. Meanwhile, the museum’s “Behind the Screen” exhibit examines every step of the filmmaking process, with artifacts from more than 1,400 different productions, and several classic (playable!) arcade games, including Asteroids, Ms. Pac-Man and Space Invaders. Free Fri 4–8pm.

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Astoria

The Morgan Library & Museum

This Madison Avenue institution began as the private library of financier J. Pierpont Morgan and is his artistic gift to the city. Building on the collection Morgan amassed in his lifetime, the museum houses first-rate works on paper, including drawings by Michelangelo, Rembrandt and Picasso; three Gutenberg Bibles; a copy of Frankenstein annotated by Mary Shelley; manuscripts by Dickens, Poe, Twain, Steinbeck and Wilde; sheet music handwritten by Beethoven and Mozart; and an original edition of Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, displayed every yuletide. A theater, Gilder Lehrman Hall, regularly hosts recitals and concerts. Free Fri 7–9pm.

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Murray Hill

National Museum of the American Indian

This branch of the Smithsonian Institution displays its collection around the grand rotunda of the 1907 Custom House, at the bottom of Broadway (which, many moons ago, began as an Indian trail). The life and culture of Native Americans is presented in rotating exhibitions— from Navajo jewelry to ritual tribal-dance costumes—along with contemporary artwork. The Diker Pavilion for Native Arts & Culture, which opened in 2006, has already made its mark on the cultural life of the city by offering the only dedicated showcase for Native American visual and performing arts. Free admission daily.

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Financial District Free

New York Historical Society

New York’s oldest museum, founded in 1804, was one of America’s first cultural and educational institutions. Instead of the niche perspective on NYC’s past that some of our favorite attractions offer, the Historical Society gives a comprehensive look at the New York of yesteryear. Exhibits are wide-ranging, covering all aspects of city life, and the museum’s permanent holdings—many of which are on view in the open-storage galleries on the fourth floor—offer a glimpse into quotidian urban living, with items such as vintage toys, furniture and clothing on display. Free Fri 6–8pm.

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Show more

Saturday

American Folk Art Museum

As its name suggests, the American Folk Art Museum celebrates traditional craft-based work. Located in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, the museum's unparalleled holdings in folk and outsider artworks make it one of the city's outstanding cultural centers. Free family guides are available at the admission desk, and on the first Saturday of most months, the museum hosts a family tour and workshop free with admission. Free admission daily.

Read more
Upper West Side Free

Brooklyn Museum

Brooklyn’s premier institution is a less-crowded alternative to Manhattan’s bigger-name spaces. Among the museum’s many assets is a 4,000-piece Egyptian collection, which includes a gilded-ebony statue of Amenhotep III and, on the ceiling, a large-scale rendering of an ancient map of the cosmos, as well as a mummy preserved in its original coffin. Masterworks by Cézanne, Monet and Degas, part of an impressive European collection, are displayed in the museum’s Beaux-Arts Court. On the fifth floor, American paintings and sculptures include native son Thomas Cole’s The Pic-Nic and Louis Rémy Mignot’s Niagara. Don’t miss the renowned Pacific Island and African galleries (this was the first American museum to display African objects as art). Free Sat 511pm.

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Prospect Park

Bronx Museum of the Arts

Founded in 1971 and featuring more than 1000 works, this multicultural art museum shines a spotlight on 20th- and 21st-century artists who are either Bronx-based or of African, Asian or Latino ancestry. The museum sporadically offers family programming. Free admission daily.

Read more
The Bronx Free

El Museo del Barrio

Located in Spanish Harlem (a.k.a. El Barrio), El Museo del Barrio is dedicated to the work of Latino artists who reside in the U.S., as well as Latin American masters. The 6,500-piece permanent collection ranges from pre-Colombian artifacts to contemporary installations. The space also features an exposed courtyard for programming and events, and a Pan-Latino cafe that serves tacos, chili, and rice and beans. Free every third Sat of the month.

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East Harlem

The Jewish Museum

The Jewish Museum, housed in the 1908 Warburg Mansion, contains a fascinating collection of more than 30,000 works of art, artifacts and media installations. The two-floor permanent exhibition, “Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey,” examines how Judaism has survived and explores various Jewish identities throughout history. There is also a permanent interactive archaeology exhibit specifically for children. The Café Weissman serves contemporary kosher fare. Free Sat all day.

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Central Park

The Museum at FIT

The Fashion Institute of Technology owns one of the largest and most impressive collections of clothing, textiles and accessories in the world, including some 50,000 costumes and fabrics dating from the 18th century to the present. Overseen by fashion historian Dr. Valerie Steele, the museum showcases a selection from the permanent collection, as well as temporary exhibitions focusing on individual designers or the role fashion plays in society. Free admission daily.

Read more
Midtown West Free

National Museum of the American Indian

This branch of the Smithsonian Institution displays its collection around the grand rotunda of the 1907 Custom House, at the bottom of Broadway (which, many moons ago, began as an Indian trail). The life and culture of Native Americans is presented in rotating exhibitions— from Navajo jewelry to ritual tribal-dance costumes—along with contemporary artwork. The Diker Pavilion for Native Arts & Culture, which opened in 2006, has already made its mark on the cultural life of the city by offering the only dedicated showcase for Native American visual and performing arts. Free admission daily.

Read more
Financial District Free

Queens County Farm Museum

The oldest continually farmed land in NYC, the now-47-acre stretch offers a petting zoo for the kids and school groups, who do most of the visiting. But a 2008 expansion of the growing fields means everyone can benefit from the vegetables, wine and meat that the farm cultivates, sold on site and on Fridays at the Union Square Greenmarket. In the fall, pick your own pumpkins here, and test your navigation skills in the corn maze. Free admission daily.

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Queens Free

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim is as famous for its landmark building—designed by Frank Lloyd Wright—as it is for its impressive collection and daring temporary shows. The museum owns Peggy Guggenheim’s trove of Cubist, Surrealist and Abstract Expressionist works, along with the Panza di Biumo Collection of American Minimalist and Conceptual art from the 1960s and ’70s. In addition to works by Manet, Picasso, Chagall and Bourgeois, it holds the largest collection of Kandinskys in the U.S. In 1992, the addition of a ten-story tower provided space for a sculpture gallery (with park views), an auditorium and a café. Pay what you wish Sat 5:457:45pm.

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Upper East Side

Sunday

American Folk Art Museum

As its name suggests, the American Folk Art Museum celebrates traditional craft-based work. Located in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, the museum's unparalleled holdings in folk and outsider artworks make it one of the city's outstanding cultural centers. Free family guides are available at the admission desk, and on the first Saturday of most months, the museum hosts a family tour and workshop free with admission. Free admission daily.

Read more
Upper West Side Free

Bronx Museum of the Arts

Founded in 1971 and featuring more than 1000 works, this multicultural art museum shines a spotlight on 20th- and 21st-century artists who are either Bronx-based or of African, Asian or Latino ancestry. The museum sporadically offers family programming. Free admission daily.

Read more
The Bronx Free

The Frick Collection

The opulent residence that houses a private collection of great masters (from the 14th through the 19th centuries) was originally built for industrialist Henry Clay Frick. The firm of Carrère & Hastings designed the 1914 structure in an 18th-century European style, with a beautiful interior court and reflecting pool. The permanent collections include world-class paintings, sculpture and furniture by the likes of Rembrandt, Vermeer, Renoir and French cabinetmaker Jean-Henri Riesener. Free 11am1pm.

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Lenox Hill

National Museum of the American Indian

This branch of the Smithsonian Institution displays its collection around the grand rotunda of the 1907 Custom House, at the bottom of Broadway (which, many moons ago, began as an Indian trail). The life and culture of Native Americans is presented in rotating exhibitions— from Navajo jewelry to ritual tribal-dance costumes—along with contemporary artwork. The Diker Pavilion for Native Arts & Culture, which opened in 2006, has already made its mark on the cultural life of the city by offering the only dedicated showcase for Native American visual and performing arts.Free admission daily.

Read more
Financial District Free

New York Hall of Science

Built for the 1964 World’s Fair, the Hall of Science demystifies its subject through colorful hands-on exhibits, such as the new Design Lab and Mathematica. In summer, children can burn off their excess energy—and perhaps learn a thing or two—in the 60,000-square-foot outdoor science playground. Free Fri 25pm, Sun 1011am.

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Queens

Queens County Farm Museum

The oldest continually farmed land in NYC, the now-47-acre stretch offers a petting zoo for the kids and school groups, who do most of the visiting. But a 2008 expansion of the growing fields means everyone can benefit from the vegetables, wine and meat that the farm cultivates, sold on site and on Fridays at the Union Square Greenmarket. In the fall, pick your own pumpkins here, and test your navigation skills in the corn maze. Free admission daily.

Read more
Queens Free

Studio Museum in Harlem

When Studio Museum opened in 1968, it was the first black fine-arts museum in the country, and it remains the place to go for historical insight into African-American art and the art of the African diaspora. Under the leadership of director and chief curator Thelma Golden (formerly of the Whitney), this neighborhood favorite has evolved into the city’s most exciting showcase for contemporary African-American artists. Free all day Sun.

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Harlem

Monday

Center for Jewish History/Yeshiva University Museum

Presenting a collection of more than 8,000 artifacts, four galleries and an outdoor sculpture garden, this historic site offers everything from folk art to Jewish ceremonial objects. Among many highlights include Bronze Age to Late Antique Period archaeological artifacts, Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten letter from 1818 establishing religious freedom and clothing, and accessories from around the world. Free Mon, Wed 5-8pm, Fri all day.

Read more
Flatiron

Museum at Eldridge Street

For its first 50 years, the 1887 synagogue had a congregation of thousands and doubled as a mutual-aid society for new arrivals in need of financial assistance, health care and employment. But as Jews left the area and the congregation dwindled, the building fell into disrepair. A recently completed 20-year, $18.5 million face-lift has restored the splendor of the soaring main sanctuary, which features hand-stenciled walls and gorgeous stained-glass: an original rose window and a new design by artist Kiki Smith and architect Deborah Gans. Downstairs, touch-screen displays highlight the synagogue’s architecture, aspects of worship and local history. Free all day Mon.

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Chinatown

National Museum of the American Indian

This branch of the Smithsonian Institution displays its collection around the grand rotunda of the 1907 Custom House, at the bottom of Broadway (which, many moons ago, began as an Indian trail). The life and culture of Native Americans is presented in rotating exhibitions— from Navajo jewelry to ritual tribal-dance costumes—along with contemporary artwork. The Diker Pavilion for Native Arts & Culture, which opened in 2006, has already made its mark on the cultural life of the city by offering the only dedicated showcase for Native American visual and performing arts. Free admission daily.

Read more
Financial District Free

Queens County Farm Museum

The oldest continually farmed land in NYC, the now-47-acre stretch offers a petting zoo for the kids and school groups, who do most of the visiting. But a 2008 expansion of the growing fields means everyone can benefit from the vegetables, wine and meat that the farm cultivates, sold on site and on Fridays at the Union Square Greenmarket. In the fall, pick your own pumpkins here, and test your navigation skills in the corn maze. Free admission daily.

Read more
Queens Free

Tuesday

American Folk Art Museum

As its name suggests, the American Folk Art Museum celebrates traditional craft-based work. Located in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, the museum's unparalleled holdings in folk and outsider artworks make it one of the city's outstanding cultural centers. Free family guides are available at the admission desk, and on the first Saturday of most months, the museum hosts a family tour and workshop free with admission. Free admission daily.

Read more
Upper West Side Free

China Institute

China is the focus at this institute, which is the oldest bicultural organization devoted to that country in the U.S. Enter through its bright red front door, which is flanked by twin lion statues—the animals were added to the turn-of-the-century building in 1944. The institute serves all things Middle Kingdom, hosting Mandarin classes for kids and adults, films and lectures on Chinese culture. Free Tue and Thu 6–8pm.

Read more
Lenox Hill

National Museum of the American Indian

This branch of the Smithsonian Institution displays its collection around the grand rotunda of the 1907 Custom House, at the bottom of Broadway (which, many moons ago, began as an Indian trail). The life and culture of Native Americans is presented in rotating exhibitions— from Navajo jewelry to ritual tribal-dance costumes—along with contemporary artwork. The Diker Pavilion for Native Arts & Culture, which opened in 2006, has already made its mark on the cultural life of the city by offering the only dedicated showcase for Native American visual and performing arts.Free admission daily.

Read more
Financial District Free

The Museum at FIT

The Fashion Institute of Technology owns one of the largest and most impressive collections of clothing, textiles and accessories in the world, including some 50,000 costumes and fabrics dating from the 18th century to the present. Overseen by fashion historian Dr. Valerie Steele, the museum showcases a selection from the permanent collection, as well as temporary exhibitions focusing on individual designers or the role fashion plays in society. Free admission daily.

Read more
Midtown West Free

Queens County Farm Museum

The oldest continually farmed land in NYC, the now-47-acre stretch offers a petting zoo for the kids and school groups, who do most of the visiting. But a 2008 expansion of the growing fields means everyone can benefit from the vegetables, wine and meat that the farm cultivates, sold on site and on Fridays at the Union Square Greenmarket. In the fall, pick your own pumpkins here, and test your navigation skills in the corn maze. Free admission daily.

Read more
Queens Free

Society of Illustrators

Since it was founded in 1901, the Society of Illustrators has promoted the work of artists around the world through events and exhibitions in the former carriage house of William P. Read, attorney to J. P. Morgan, on the Upper East Side. Free Tue 5–8pm.

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Lenox Hill

Staten Island Museum

The museum's exhibits cover arts, sciences and local history. It also sponsors programs for both kids and adults. Free Tue noon–2pm.

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Staten Island

Wave Hill

This city-owned garden in the Riverdale section of the Bronx retains the same horticultural traditions as when it was a private estate. You’ll find an elegant 19th-century mansion surrounded by meticulously groomed gardens, featuring abundant wildflowers and shady pergolas. The area offers sweeping views of the river and the New Jersey Palisades. Wake up early to take advantage of free admission between 9am and noon every Saturday during select months of the year. Free Tue 9am–noon.

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The Bronx

Wednesday

American Folk Art Museum

As its name suggests, the American Folk Art Museum celebrates traditional craft-based work. Located in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, the museum's unparalleled holdings in folk and outsider artworks make it one of the city's outstanding cultural centers. Free family guides are available at the admission desk, and on the first Saturday of most months, the museum hosts a family tour and workshop free with admission. Free admission daily.

Read more
Upper West Side Free

Center for Jewish History/Yeshiva University Museum

Presenting a collection of more than 8,000 artifacts, four galleries and an outdoor sculpture garden, this historic site offers everything from folk art to Jewish ceremonial objects. Among many highlights include Bronze Age to Late Antique Period archaeological artifacts, Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten letter from 1818 establishing religious freedom and clothing, and accessories from around the world. Free Mon, Wed 5-8pm, Fri all day.

Read more
Flatiron

The Museum at FIT

The Fashion Institute of Technology owns one of the largest and most impressive collections of clothing, textiles and accessories in the world, including some 50,000 costumes and fabrics dating from the 18th century to the present. Overseen by fashion historian Dr. Valerie Steele, the museum showcases a selection from the permanent collection, as well as temporary exhibitions focusing on individual designers or the role fashion plays in society. Free admission daily.

Read more
Midtown West Free

Museum of Jewish Heritage—A Living Memorial to the Holocaust

This museum explores Jewish life before, during and after the Nazi genocide. The permanent collection includes documentary films, thousands of photos and 800 artifacts, many donated by Holocaust survivors and their families, while the Memorial Garden features English artist Andy Goldsworthy’s Garden of Stones, 18 fire-hollowed boulders embedded with dwarf oak saplings. The Keeping History Center brings the core collection to life with interactive displays. Wed 4–8pm free.

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Battery Park City

National Museum of the American Indian

This branch of the Smithsonian Institution displays its collection around the grand rotunda of the 1907 Custom House, at the bottom of Broadway (which, many moons ago, began as an Indian trail). The life and culture of Native Americans is presented in rotating exhibitions— from Navajo jewelry to ritual tribal-dance costumes—along with contemporary artwork. The Diker Pavilion for Native Arts & Culture, which opened in 2006, has already made its mark on the cultural life of the city by offering the only dedicated showcase for Native American visual and performing arts.Free admission daily.

Read more
Financial District Free

Queens County Farm Museum

The oldest continually farmed land in NYC, the now-47-acre stretch offers a petting zoo for the kids and school groups, who do most of the visiting. But a 2008 expansion of the growing fields means everyone can benefit from the vegetables, wine and meat that the farm cultivates, sold on site and on Fridays at the Union Square Greenmarket. In the fall, pick your own pumpkins here, and test your navigation skills in the corn maze. Free admission daily.

Read more
Queens Free

Van Cortlandt House Museum

Built by a rich merchant-farmer family in 1748, this fieldstone mansion housed both British and American armies during the Revolutionary War and gave George Washington a place to rest his head. This place has the distinction of being the city’s first historic house museum, opened in 1896, and offers both self-guided and volunteer docent-led tours of the collection of colonial furniture and decorative objects. Free all day Wed.

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The Bronx

Thursday

American Folk Art Museum

As its name suggests, the American Folk Art Museum celebrates traditional craft-based work. Located in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, the museum's unparalleled holdings in folk and outsider artworks make it one of the city's outstanding cultural centers. Free family guides are available at the admission desk, and on the first Saturday of most months, the museum hosts a family tour and workshop free with admission. Free admission daily.

Read more
Upper West Side Free

Bronx Museum of the Arts

Founded in 1971 and featuring more than 800 works, this multicultural art museum shines a spotlight on 20th- and 21st-century artists who are either Bronx-based or of African, Asian or Latino ancestry. The museum sporadically offers family programming. Free admission daily.

Read more
The Bronx Free

China Institute

China is the focus at this institute, which is the oldest bicultural organization devoted to that country in the U.S. Enter through its bright red front door, which is flanked by twin lion statues—the animals were added to the turn-of-the-century building in 1944. The institute serves all things Middle Kingdom, hosting Mandarin classes for kids and adults, films and lectures on Chinese culture. Free Thu 6–8pm.

Read more
Lenox Hill

Museum of Arts & Design

Founded in 1956 as the Museum of Contemporary Crafts, the institution brings together contemporary objects created in a wide range of media—including clay, glass, wood, metal and cloth—with a strong focus on materials and process. Visitors can now watch as resident artists create works in studios on the sixth floor, and curators are able to display more of the 2,000-piece permanent collection in the larger space, including porcelain ware by Cindy Sherman, stained glass by Judith Schaechter, black-basalt ceramics by James Turrell, and Robert Arneson’s mural Alice House Wall, on view for the first time in two decades. Free Thu 6–9pm.

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Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA)

MOCA occupies an airy former machine shop designed by prominent Chinese-American architect Maya Lin. In an interior loosely inspired by a traditional Chinese house, with rooms radiating off a central courtyard and areas defined by screens, MOCA’s core exhibit traces the development of Chinese communities on these shores from the 17th century to the present through objects, images and video. Mixed-media displays cover the development of industries such as laundries and restaurants in New York, Chinese stereotypes in pop culture, and the suspicion and humiliation Chinese-Americans endured during World War II and the McCarthy era.  Free first Thu of every month.

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Little Italy

National Museum of the American Indian

This branch of the Smithsonian Institution displays its collection around the grand rotunda of the 1907 Custom House, at the bottom of Broadway (which, many moons ago, began as an Indian trail). The life and culture of Native Americans is presented in rotating exhibitions— from Navajo jewelry to ritual tribal-dance costumes—along with contemporary artwork. The Diker Pavilion for Native Arts & Culture, which opened in 2006, has already made its mark on the cultural life of the city by offering the only dedicated showcase for Native American visual and performing arts. Free admission daily.

Read more
Financial District Free

The Museum at FIT

The Fashion Institute of Technology owns one of the largest and most impressive collections of clothing, textiles and accessories in the world, including some 50,000 costumes and fabrics dating from the 18th century to the present. Overseen by fashion historian Dr. Valerie Steele, the museum showcases a selection from the permanent collection, as well as temporary exhibitions focusing on individual designers or the role fashion plays in society. Free admission daily.

Read more
Midtown West Free

New Museum of Contemporary Art

The first new art museum ever constructed from the ground up below 14th Street, the aptly named New Museum marks a major contribution to the continuing revitalization of downtown Manhattan. The bold seven-storey building, designed by the cutting-edge Tokyo architectural firm Sejima + Nishizawa/SANAA, opened in December 2007, housing three main gallery levels, a theatre, a café and roof terraces. The focus here is on emerging media and surveys of important but under-recognised artists—further evidence of its pioneering spirit. Free Thu 7–9pm.

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Lower East Side

Queens County Farm Museum

The oldest continually farmed land in NYC, the now-47-acre stretch offers a petting zoo for the kids and school groups, who do most of the visiting. But a 2008 expansion of the growing fields means everyone can benefit from the vegetables, wine and meat that the farm cultivates, sold on site and on Fridays at the Union Square Greenmarket. In the fall, pick your own pumpkins here, and test your navigation skills in the corn maze. Free admission daily.

Read more
Queens Free

Comments

4 comments
Lindsey
Lindsey

Also, shanikiarlin!@aol.com, I've been to the Beonx museum and it sounds like exactly what you're looking for ... The description above doesn't do it justice :)

Lindsey
Lindsey

Read more carefully... here are just two examples from above... Studio Museum: "When Studio Museum opened in 1968, it was the first black fine-arts museum in the country, and it remains the place to go for historical insight into African-American art and the art of the African diaspora. Under the leadership of director Lowery Sims (formerly at the Met) and chief curator Thelma Golden (formerly of the Whitney), this neighborhood favorite has evolved into the city’s most exciting showcase for contemporary African-American artists." The Brooklyn Museum: " The Pic-Nic and Louis Rémy Mignot’s Niagara. "Don’t miss the renowned Pacific Island and African galleries (this was the first American museum to display African objects as art)."

Diamond
Diamond

The fact that u list ANYTHING for free is cool. But there is nothing listed overall in your listings that would be geared toward and African American cultural interests other than some of the Museums. None of the musical venues reflect our music.