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Hanukkah in New York

From New York's best potato latkas and kosher restaurants to Hanukkah events and activities, find everything you need to know to celebrate this Jewish holiday

Gear up for eight days of celebration! Time to nosh on latkes (and other delicious fried food), which you can sample at the annual latke festival. Or you can say l'chaim and warm up with winter cocktails. Check out our events celebrating the Festival of Lights.

When is Hanukkah 2014?

Hanukkah 2014 begins at sunset on Tuesday, December 16 and lasts until Wednesday, December 24.

Hanukkah Food

Restaurants

100 best New York restaurants: Jewish Delicatessen

Some of the best New York restaurants are classic Jewish delis—places where you can still get a pastrami sandwich, smoked fish or a bowl of matzo ball soup. More of the 100 best New York restaurants New American restaurants The best New York restaurants that explore the dynamic and malleable cuisine known as "New American" are some of the most beloved in town. BBQ & Soul food restaurants The best New York restaurants that feature low-and-slow–cooked meats and down-home staples satisfy our cravings for classic American comfort food. Best pizza restaurants Some of the best New York restaurants put sauce, cheese and twirled dough at a premium. But of all the pizzerias in NYC only a few contenders made our list. Jewish Delicatessens Some of the best New York restaurants are classic Jewish delis—places where you can still get a pastrami sandwich, smoked fish or a bowl of matzo ball soup. British & Irish restaurants The best New York restaurants to offer English-style eats both come from one chef: The talented April Bloomfield. Check out her pair of British gastropubs. Authentic Indian restaurants Some of the best New York restaurants highlight the complex cuisine of India. Here are our favorites, offering spicy curries and sub-continental classics. Chinese restaurants The best New York restaurants that specialize in Chinese food range from noodle shops and dim sum parlors to hyper-regional Szechuan and Xi'an kitchens. Japanese restaurants The cuisine of Japan is incredibly di

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Restaurants

Best kosher restaurants and cafes in New York City

Whether you keep kosher or are entertaining observant Jewish pals, these New York kosher restaurants will please a mixed crowd. Observant Jews don’t have to settle for falafel in New York City, where there are plenty of kosher restaurants to suit religious gourmands. Under careful rabbinical supervision, these kosher eateries abide by orthodox Jewish policies ensuring that their standards are never compromised, even in the busiest of kitchens. From delis and bistros to world-class Indian food, here are our favorite kosher restaurants in NYC. Did we miss your favorite New York kosher restaurant? Let us know in the comments. The Prime Grill (Supervised by OU)Owner Joey Allaham tries to operate his meat emporium like a proper midtown steakhouse first, kosher steakhouse second. That means serious waiters, a clientele of glatt gourmands who are comfortable bringing nonkosher guests here, and a safe, classy wood-heavy interior. You won't find filet mignon (too close to the back to be a kosher cut), but slabs of dry-aged rib eye and sirloin are richly satisfying. Le Marais (Supervised by OU)Relinquish your Times Square restaurant prejudices. Unlike its megachain neighbors, this kosher French bistro does most things well (dessert can be skipped) and some things superbly. Thank the on-site butcher for the piquant steak au poivre. The house frites are crisp and satisfying, and will have even gentiles plotzing. Blossom Vegan Restaurant (Supervised by Lev Schwartz)For cautious carnivores

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Restaurants

Interesting moments in the history of Jewish food in NYC

1654: North America's first Jews, a group of 23 Spanish and Portuguese refugees, dock in New Amsterdam. 1851: Ernest Nathan opens the first kosher slaughterhouse on Bushwick Avenue, establishing the Brooklyn meatpacking industry.1888: The Lustig family opens a Jewish delicatessen on the Lower East Side. In 1902, the business is sold to the Eisland brothers, who relocate it to a space across Ludlow. Benny and Harry Katz take it over in 1916, changing the name to Katz's Delicatessen and moving it across the street, where it remains today. 1890s: The egg cream—a soda fountain drink made with chocolate syrup, milk and soda water—is born. Many historians attribute Jewish candy store owner Louis Auster with its invention, but facts surrounding the drink's origins are murky.      1907: Ukrainian-Jewish immigrant Nathan Radutzky starts producing the tahini-based sweet halvah. More than 100 years later, Joyva (now run by his grandson Richard) still produces Radutzky's candies—halvah, jelly rings and more—right in Brooklyn. 1921: Bella and Elias Gabay establish Gabila's Knishes, which continues to supply Jewish delis today. The couple first conceived of the snack when a customer orders blintzes with potatoes instead of cheese at their Lower East Side restaurant. The puffy potato square—named for the town of Nish, where the pair were married—proved to be popular, and Elias started selling them from a pushcart on the Lower East Side and in Coney Island.   1939: At the New York World's Fa

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Restaurants

Fried food for Hanukkah

Celebrate Hanukkah with the best fried foods in NYC. RECOMMENDED: Guide to Hanukkah in NYC

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Jewish culture in New York

Museums

The Jewish Museum

The Jewish Museum, housed in the 1908 Warburg Mansion, contains a fascinating collection of more than 28,000 works of art, artifacts and media installations. The two-floor permanent exhibition, “Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey,” examines how Judaism has survived and explores various Jewish identities throughout history. There is also a permanent exhibit specifically for children: The Café Weissman serves contemporary kosher fare.

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Museums

Jewish Children's Museum

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Museums

Museum of Jewish Heritage—A Living Memorial to the Holocaust

This museum explores Jewish life before, during and after the Nazi genocide. The permanent collection includes documentary films, thousands of photos and 800 artifacts, many donated by Holocaust survivors and their families, while the Memorial Garden features English artist Andy Goldsworthy’s Garden of Stones, 18 fire-hollowed boulders embedded with dwarf oak saplings. Special exhibitions tackle historical events or themes, such as “Crack, Bam, Dot! The Game of Mah Jongg in Jewish-American Life,” on view through December. The new Keeping History Center brings the core collection to life with interactive displays, including “Voices of Liberty,” a soundscape of émigrés’ and refugees’ reactions to their arrival in the U.S.—which is made all the more poignant juxtaposed with the museum’s panoramic views of Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty.

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Museums

The Anne Frank Center USA

An affiliate of the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam, this center offers kids a way to learn about and connect with the brave diarist, who bore witness to life's wonder and fear even as she hid with her family in an attic during the Nazi occupation of Amsterdam. The permanent exhibit, "Anne Frank and Us," challenges all visitors to reflect on what personal responsibility to others means.

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Museums

Eldridge Street Synagogue

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Museums

Center for Jewish History/Yeshiva University Museum

Presenting a collection of more than 8,000 artifacts, four galleries and an outdoor sculpture garden, this historic site offers everything from folk art to Jewish ceremonial objects. Among many highlights include Bronze Age to Late Antique Period archaeological artifacts, Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten letter from 1818 establishing religious freedom and clothing, and accessories from around the world.

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Things to do

Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion

The HUC-JIR is a religious and scholarly learning organization that aims to help people learn Jewish values, responsibilities and texts—and to apply them to life and work.

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