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Off Broadway shows, reviews, tickets and listings

Here is where to find reviews, details, schedules, prices and ticket information about Off Broadway shows in New York

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New York theater ranges far beyond the 41 large midtown houses that we call Broadway. Many of the city's most innovative and engaging new plays and musicals can be found Off Broadway, in venues that seat between 100 and 499 people. (Those that seat fewer than 100 people usually fall into the Off-Off Broadway category.) These more intimate spaces present work in a wide range of styles, from new pieces by major artists at the Public Theater or Playwrights Horizons to revivals at the Signature Theatre and crowd-pleasing commercial fare at New World Stages. And even the best Off Broadway shows usually cost less than their cousins on the Great White Way—even if you score cheap Broadway tickets. Use our listings to find reviews, prices, ticket links, curtain times and more for current and upcoming Off Broadway shows.

RECOMMENDED: The 21 Best Off Broadway Shows to See This Fall

NEW OFF BROADWAY SHOWS NOW PLAYING

  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • Chelsea

The Irish Rep, a leader in virtual theater during the shutdown, reopens its mainstage to live performance with the debut play by the Irish novelist Kevin Barry (Night Boat to Tangier). Maeve Higgins and company mainstay John Keating play adult siblings whose elderly father clings inconveniently to life. Ciarán O’Reilly directs this dark comedy, which is set in Cork.

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  • Dance
  • Contemporary and experimental
  • Greenwich Village

YouTube stars and MTV Video Music Award–nominated performer-choreographers Keone and Mari Madrid, who have created dances for Justin Bieber and So You Think You Can Dance, play the lead roles in this immersive dance musical created with Hideaway Circus's Josh Aviner and Lyndsay Magid Aviner. The story, told through West Coast urban dance, is loosely inspired by Romeo and Juliet; the design involves a large amount of yarn. 

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

Theater Breaking Through Barriers, whose productions prominently feature actors with disabilities, returns to George Tabori's 1962 revue of poems, songs, stories and dramatic scenes by the rabble-rousing German playwright Bertolt Brecht, which the company first prioduced in 2001. Nicholas Viselli directs a cast of 9 that includes musical director Dionne McClain-Freeney; the music is by Kurt Weill and Hans Eisler.

 

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  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Midtown West

In John S. Anastasi’s old-fashioned courtroom thriller, which won top honors at the 2019 New York Summerfest festival, Emanuele Secci plays a heart surgeon with a Harvard degree (and a gambling addiction) who must defend himself in against a potentially career-ending malpractice suitPeter J. Loewy directs the Off Broadway premiere.

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Gramercy

Broadway actors Alex Wyse (Spring Awakening) and Ben Fankhauser (Newsies) star in their own original musical comedy about a pair of songwriters engaged to write a jingle for a famous pop diva played by Bryonha Marie Parham (Prince of Broadway). Ad nauseam presumably ensues! Marshall Pailet (Triassic Parq) directs, and the choreo is by Hamilton assistant choreographer Stephanie Klemons.

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  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • West Village

From the delightfully fractured mind of Douglas Carter Beane (XanaduThe Little Dog Laughed) springs this comedic mash-up of classic fairy tales and A Midsummer Night's Dream. Beane himself directs the world premiere with a primo cast that features some of the very funniest comic actors in America, including Mo Rocca, Jackie Hoffman, Ann Harada, Julie Halston and Arnie Burton. Who could wish for more? 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Greenwich Village

Lili Taylor, with a deceptive air of amiable familiarity, plays the narrator in Wallace Shawn’s purgatory 1990 monologue. Visiting an impoverished foreign land, she is seized by a violent illness that serves as a manifestation of her growing self-disgust. The play confronts us about how much labor goes into denying how much our comfort is predicated on the poverty and suffering of othersThe Fever doesn’t want to make you sick. What it says, with ineluctable directness, is: You are sick already.—Adam Feldman

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  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • Hell's Kitchen

Maarten Cornelis directs a version of Oscar Wilde's dazzlingly epigrammatic 1895 upper-class farce The Importance of Being Earnest that is set in modern-day New York, with a pair of same-sex male couples and some voguing thrown in for good measure. Preston FoxClint Blakely, Kenon Veno and Michael Morley play the central foursome, with Denise Turkan as the dragonish Lady Bracknell.

  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Hell's Kitchen

Rajiv Joseph (Guards at the Taj) revisits his character Suresh—the teenage origami prodigy of his 2008 play Animals out of Paper—in a new play about written correspondences among four characters seeking connection over the course of years. May Adrales directs the world premiere at Second Stage; the cast includes Ali Ahn, Ramiz Monsef, Kellie Overbey and Thom Sesma. 

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

Jeremy Jordan, Tammy Blanchard and Christian Borle star in the latest revival of this dark, tuneful and utterly winsome 1982 horror-camp musical about a flesh-eating plant who makes dreams come true for a lowly flower-shop worker. Composer Alan Menken and librettist Howard Ashman wrap a sordid tale of capitalist temptation and moral decay in layers of sweetness, humor, wit and camp.—Adam Feldman

  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Midtown West

Manhattan Theatre Club reopens its Off Broadway home with the world premiere of a play by England's Simon Stephens (The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time) that tracks a woman through five decades of life in New York City, including Greenwich Village in its folkie-bohemian phase. The formidable cast—which comprises Edie Falco, Blair Brown and Marin Ireland—is directed by Lila Neugebauer (The Waverly Gallery).

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  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • Hell's Kitchen

Paul Osborne's gentle 1939 comedy about four elderly Midwestern sisters has had two hit Broadway revivals, in 1980 and 2002, that took full advantage of the play's greatest asset: its variety of roles for an ensemble of veteran actors who can draw marvelous colors within the lines of Osborne's touching group portrait of intimacy and loneliness. This revival, directed by the Peccadillo Theater Company's Dan Wackerman, has lined up a very promising cast indeed: Lindsay Crouse, Alma Cuervo, Judith Ivey, Dan Lauria, Patty McCormack, Tony Roberts, John Rubinstein, Keri Safran and Jonathan Spivey. 

  • Theater
  • Experimental
  • Soho

The Wooster Group has been in the front lines of postmodern, tech-forward, intensely detailed avant-garde performance in America for nearly half a century, but this is the first time it has taken on a play by the German political-theater radical Bertolt Brecht. Adapted from a novel by Maxim Gorky, The Mother (1932) depicts an impoverished Russian woman's journey toward revolutionary consciousness. Company leader Elizabeth LeCompte directs, as always; the cast includes Jim Fletcher, Ari Fliakos, Gareth Hobbs, Erin Mullin and, in the title role, the fearless and peerless Kate Valk.

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  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • Hell's Kitchen

George Bernard Shaw specialist David Staller, the longtime impresario of the monthly staged-reading series Project Shaw, directs the Bearded One's provocative dramedy, in which a genteel young woman is horrified to discover that her mother is a madam. Censored by a priggish Lord Chamberlain, the play was not performed onstage for nearly a decade after it was written in 1893. Karen Ziemba and Nicole King play the central roles in Staller's 100-minute adaptation, joined by Robert Cuccioli, David Lee Huynh, Alvin Keith and Raphael Nash Thompson.

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  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • Hell's Kitchen

Jocelyn Bioh (Merry Wives) follows up on the success of 2017's School Girls; or, The African Mean Girls Play with another comedy set in Africa. The heroine of this romcom is a young actress who aspires to break into the burgeoning Nigerian film industry, earning the attention of a notable director and a handsome leading man (to the dismay of one of Nollywood's existing leading ladies). Saheem Ali directs the world premiere for MCC Theater, with a cast that includes Abena, Charlie Hudson III, Nana Mensah, Sandra Okuboyejo, Ade Otukoya and Emana Rachelle. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • East Village

Adapted by Sarah Rose Kearns from the novel by Jane Austen, Persuasion presents a gleeful if ultimately overstuffed exercise in diversion. The marriage plot at its center holds little suspense, so the production owes much of its theatrical appeal to the creative flourishes fans have come to expect from director Eric Tucker and his acclaimed downtown company Bedlam.—Naveen Kumar

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Chelsea

Showtune savant Seth Rudetsky delivers a lively tutorial on the art and appreciation of Broadway singing in this lively solo show. He’s a one-man party, illustrating his points with a stream of delightful short A/V samples from musicals past, with the motormouth excitement of a friend who can’t wait to share a clip you may not have heard. As his sassy seminar progresses, he touches on specific terms of art and a few pet peeves. He’s a show queen par excellence, and his court is open to everyone.—Adam Feldman

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Greenwich Village

Composer Michael Sgouros and librettist Brenda Bell adapt Washington Irving's classic tale of horror and decapitated equestrianism into a spooky 90-minute musical aimed at family audiences. Directed by Bell, the show had previous New York runs in 2012 and 2013 under the title Hollow

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  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

A playboy prince thinks marriage is for the birds in this original rock version of the classic ballet tale, featuring Tchaikovsky's original music and a new libretto by Israeli lyricist and novelist Mirit Shem Ur (as well with some original tunes by Sharona Pick). Tsedi Sarfati directs a cast of 12 in the production, which plays weekly through the end of the year. 

  • Theater
  • Interactive
  • West Village

Creator-directors Darren Lee Cole and Alexander Wright transform the SoHo Playhouse into a Jazz Age speakeasy with 15 different rooms in this immersive theater experience, set on the night of the 1929 municipal election in which incumbent Jimmy Walker—abetted by the mighty Tammany Hall political machine—trounced Fiorello H. La Guardia. Expect to hobnob with such historical figures as Franklin D. Roosevelt, gangster Legs Diamond and showgirls Betty Compton and Marion “Kiki” Roberts. (The actual theater is located on the site of a former Tammany Hall outpost and clubhouse.)

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  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Hell's Kitchen

The Signature continues its dive into the oeuvre of documentary-theater VIP Anna Deavere Smith with a revival of her 1993 investigation into the riots that tore up Los Angeles after four policers were aquitted of using excessive force in the videotaped beating and arrest of Rodney King. A follow-up to Smith's 1992 Fires in the Mirror, the piece was originally performed by the playwright herself as a virtuoso multicharacter solo show; this version, directed by Taibi Magar, features an ensemble cast.

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Noho

Composer Tom Kitt and librettist Brian Yorkey, the team behind the Pulitzer Prize–winning musical Next to Normalreunite for this adaptation of Tom McCarthy's acclaimed 2007 indie film (with the Young Vic's Kwame Kwei-Armah joining them as coauthor of the book). The highly lovable David Hyde Pierce stars as a college professor fighting on behalf of two undocumented immigrants (Alysha Deslorieux and The Band's Visit's Ari'el Stachel) who have been living in his apartment. Master helmer Daniel Sullivan directs the show's world premiere at the Public, which features choreography by Lorin Latarro.

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  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

Director and puppet master Jonathan Rockefeller, who has previously created the successful children's-theater opuses The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show and Paddington Gets in a Jam, turns his attention to the Walt Disney featurettes adapted from A.A. Milne's cherished Winnie-the-Pooh books. Produced in association with Disney Theatrical Productions, the show features life-size puppets of Hundred Acre Wood denizens Winnie, Eeyore, Tigger, Piglet and the rest, and includes songs by the Sherman Brothers (Mary Poppins) and Milne himself.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Chelsea

Appropriately billed as "a ghost play in a pub," Stephen Mallatratt’s adaptation of Susan Hill’s horror novel The Woman in Black pairs shots with hair-raising shocks. Presented as a play within a play, this gothic tale of woe is set in a secluded house by the sea in early-20th-century England. There are spellbinding moments, but unlike other theatrical ghost stories, The Woman in Black doesn’t cut deep. It’s about the mood, not the mystery.—Raven Snook

UPCOMING OFF BROADWAY SHOWS

  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • East Village

Early in the 2020 pandemic crisis, the performance artist and comedian Kristina Wong sprearheaded a makeshift mask-making operation that grew into the Auntie Sewing Squad, an enormous network of volunteers that aimed to fill gaps in the government's response. Now she reflects on that experience at New York Theatre Workshop in a comedic show directed by Chay Yew (Oepidus El Rey).

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

Few live-action shorts have had the impact of Celeste Lescene and Peggy Rajski's 1994 film Trevor, which not only won an Oscar but inspired th1998 creation of Trevor Project, a suicide-prevention organization aimed at LGBTQ youth that is still very much in operation today. Now Lescene's story, about a widely bullied diva-worshipping 13-year-old kid in 1981 with a crush on another boy at his school, has been adapted into a musical by the Southern Comfort team of Dan Collins and Julianne Wick Davis. Director Marc Bruni and choreographer Josh Prince, who collaborated on Beautiful: The Carole King Musical, reunite at the reins.

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  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

Hank Morris spent two years in prison for his role in a corruption scheme involving New York's public pension fund, and during that time, he started writing a show about it. That project has since grown into a fictionalized musical comedy—with music by Austin Nuckols, lyrics by Lily Dwoskin and a book winkingly credited to Prisoner #11RO731—in which Morris's prosecutor Andrew Cuomo serves as the principal villain. (If you're going to settle scores, why not do it…with a score?) Gabriel Barre directs a cast of seven led by Garth Kravits. 

  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • Fort Greene

Will Eno (The Realistic Joneses), who specializes in existential dry comedy, turns his wry wit to Henrik Ibsen's sprawling outsize 1867 satirical verse epic, Peer Gynt, which follows the dreamily egotistical title character through decades of wild adventures (including a near-marriage to the daughter of a mountain troll and stints as an outlaw, slaver and prophet). In Eno's pared-down version, directed by Oliver Butler (What the Constitution Means to Me), the main character is a contemporary dope on a journey to find himself. 

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  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • East Village

Stephen Sondheim and John Weidman's darkly brilliant 1990 musical follows a group of president killers (or attempted killers) as they plead their demented causes and bemoan their exclusion for the American Dream. Director John Doyle's starry cast includes Steven Pasquale, Brandon Uranowitz, Will Swenson, Judy Kuhn, Wesley Taylor, Tavi Gevinson, Andy Grotelueschen, Adam Chanler-Berat and Ethan Slater as the Balladeer.

  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Noho

Erika Dickerson-Despenza won the 2021 Susan Smith Blackburn Prize for cullud wattah, a surreal look at African-American women and girls during the water-contamination crisis in Flint, MichiganCandis C. Jones directs the play's world premiere at the Public, with a cast that includes Crystal Dickinson, Lizan Mitchell, Andrea Patterson and Alicia Pilgrim.

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  • Theater
  • Drama
  • West Village

Mansa Ra's absurdist drama, in which five murdered Black men from different periods in history meet up in the afterlife, was first presented by the Rattlestick as part of its 2018 festival of new plays and then as a virtual workshop last year (when the playwright was under the name Jiréh Breon Holder). Now the show is getting a full production, directed by Christopher D. Betts, that will be performed in front of live audiences as well streamed for spectators at home. (To make the show more accessible, tickets are pay-what-you-can on November 3, 11 and 26.)

  • Theater
  • Experimental
  • Tribeca

Pitchblack Immersive Experiences, which specializes in creating theater in total darkness, presents a live audio experience set on an airplane from New York to Buenos Aires. Members of the audience don blindfolds and headphones to experience the show, which also involves the senses of touch and smell. Playwright Martín Bondone codirects with Facundo Bogarín; the company, which is based in Argentina, includes many blind and low-vision people.

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  • Theater
  • Drama
  • East Village

In Eric John Meyer's comic drama, five friends united by a seemingly harmless love of My Little Pony get caught up in dynamics from outside their Brony bubble. The Assembly's Jess Chayes (Home/Sick) directs the pandemic-delayed NYC premiere for Dutch Kills.

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

Three couples with buns in the oven manage their expectations in this modestly scaled musical—book by Sybille Pearson, score by Richard Maltby Jr. and David Shire—which has attracted something of a cult following since its brief 1983 Broadway run. Ethan Paulini directs and choreographs this revival, which was first presented for two weeks in 2019; the cast is led by Julia Murney (The Wild Party).

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Midtown West

You’ll get a kick out of this holiday stalwart, which still features Santa, wooden soldiers and the dazzling Rockettes. Whatever faults one may find with this awesomely lavish annual pageant, this show has legs. And what legs! In the signature kick line that finds its way into most of the big dance numbers, 36 flawless pairs of gams rise and fall like the batting of an eyelash, their perfect unison a testament to the disciplined human form. This is precision dancing on a massive scale—a Busby Berkeley number come to glorious life—and it takes your breath away.—Adam Feldman

  • Theater
  • Hell's Kitchen

Self-described “bubble scientist” Fan Yang's blissfully disarming act (now performed in New York by his son Deni, daughter Melody and wife Ana) consists mainly of generating a dazzling succession of bubbles in mind-blowing configurations, filling them with smoke or linking them into long chains. 

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  • Theater
  • Midtown West

The venerable Ping Chong and Company, which has been creating innovative theater since 1975, revisits the New Vic with the world premiere of a documentary-theater piece based on interviews with Black, Latinx and Asian-American teens about of how the crises of 2020 affected their lives. Sara Zatz and Kirya Traber serve as the writer-directors; most of the storytellers have no previous stage experience. 

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Chelsea

Jeanine Tesori, the most accomplished female musical-theater composer in history, has worked with several of the country's leading playwrights: Tony Kushner (Caroline, or Change), Lisa Kron (Fun Home), David Henry Hwang (Soft Power). Now she joins forces with David Lindsay-Abaire (Good People) for a musical adaptation of Lindsay-Abaire's off-kilter 2001 comedy about a New Jersey teenager with a rare disorder that makes her appear to be an elderly woman. Jessica Stone directs the premiere, which is choreographed by Danny Mefford. Casting for the show has not yet been announced.

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  • Theater
  • Classical
  • Hell's Kitchen

The bold classical troupe Red Bull Theater presents a new adaptation of Ben Jonson's classic Jacobean comedy The Alchemist that reunites the team behind its delightful 2017 version of The Government Inspector: director Jesse Berger and playwright Jeffrey Hatcher. The promising cast of the show—in which three wily con artists make the most of a plague—comprises Reg Rogers, Manoel Felciano, Jennifer Sánchez, Carson Elrod, Stephen DeRosa, Teresa Avia Lim, Nathan Christopher, Louis Mustillo, Allen Tedder and Merry Wives's Jacob Ming-Trent. 

  • Theater
  • Drama
  • DUMBO

The major contemporary Irish playwright and director Enda Walsh (Ballyturk) returns to St. Ann's Warehouse for the ninth time with his latest absurdist meditation on the blurry lines between reality and performance. In this one, set at a psychiatric hospital, Domhnall Gleeson plays a man undergoing a bizarre form of drama therapy administered by two women named Mary, played by Clare Barrett and Aoife Duffin, to the beats of live percussion by drummer Seán Carpio. A lobster costume is involved.

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  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Hell's Kitchen

Bah humbug, my dear Watson! Writer-director Mark Shanahan combines the worlds of Charles Dickens and Arthur Conan Doyle in a holiday play that imagines Sherlock Holmes investigating the mysterious demise of reformed skinflint Ebenezer Scrooge, at the behest of a no-longer-tiny Tim. 

  • Theater
  • Circuses & magic
  • DUMBO

A new take on the legendary Bozo the Clown is among the many attractions at the inaugural edition of Remarkable Entertainment's Empire Circus, an immersive children-of-all-ages experience at Dumbo's five-story Empire Stores (home to the Time Out Market) and its riverside courtyard. Attendees choose their own paths through a variety of acts in a show directed and cocreated by stage and circus performer Lorenzo Pisoni. The actor David Arquette, who now own the rights to Bozo, serves as the project's creative director.

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  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • Gramercy

The OG Carrie Bradshaw, Candace Bushnell—from whose columns about modern dating the series Sex and the City was adapted—takes to the stage in an autobiographical one-woman show that dishes about how she came of age and wonder whether now, as a single woman in her 50s, her age of coming has passed. Lorin Latarro directs the New York premiere.

  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Hell's Kitchen

Sylvia Khoury examines the legacy of American imperialism in a thriller that focuses on a brother and sister struggling to navigate the perilous landscape of Afghanistan in the aftermath of the U.S. military withdrawal. Tyne Rafaeli directs the NYC premiere, which has become even more tragically timely since its originally scheduled run last year. 

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  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Lenox Hill

The York Theatre Company, which specializes in musicals, has been headquartered at the St. Peter's Church for three decades, but flooding has forced it to relocate temporarily to a different church space on the East Side: the Theatre at St. Jean's. Its first full live production there is Cheek to Cheek, a revue of film songs by Great American Songbook master Irving Berlin. Randy Skinner (42nd Street) directs and choreographs a cast of six in this buffet of song and dance, which draws from movies including Top HatWhite Christmas and Holiday Inn; the book is by Barry Kleinbort, and David Hancock is the music director.

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Midtown West

Increasingly, the world seems polarized into two factions who can barely understand each other, much less find common ground: those who cherish the 2003 romantic comedy Love Actually, which tracks multiple characters through the holiday season in London, and those who recognize it as the extremely terrible garbage that it is. This musical spoof—by Bob and Tobly Smith, the brothers behind pervious musical parodies of FriendsThe OfficeSaved by the Bell and other cultural touchstones—aims to appeal to both camps. 

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  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Noho

John Kevin Jones goes to the Dickens in this one-hour account of the novelist's classic holiday ghost story, adapted with director Rhonda Dodd. The Merchant's House Museum, formerly the home of a wealthy 19th-century family, provides an atmospheric candlelit setting for Jones's ninth annual engagement. Performances on Fridays and Saturdays (and from December 21 though 28) include a postshow reception at which the audience sips mulled wine and Jones recites Clement Moore's “A Visit from St. Nicholas.”

  • Theater
  • Circuses & magic
  • Midtown West

The mammoth Québécois neocirque troupe presents its first holiday-themed production, an extended riff on Clement Clarke Moore's 1823 poem "A Visit from St. Nicholas." Writer-director James Hadley's show follows a young girl who is yanked, on Christmas Eve, into a magical world where acrobatics and elaborate spectacle take the place of those boring old dancing sugar plums. 

LONG-RUNNING OFF BROADWAY SHOWS

Blue Man Group
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • Noho

Three deadpan blue-skinned men with extraterrestrial imaginations carry this tourist fave, a show as smart as it is ridiculous. They drum on open tubs of paint, creating splashes of color; they consume Twinkies and Cap'n Crunch; they engulf the audience in a roiling sea of toilet paper. For sheer weird, exuberant fun, it's hard to top this long-running treat.—Adam Feldman

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Hell's Kitchen

Self-described “bubble scientist” Fan Yang's blissfully disarming act (now performed in New York by his son Deni, daughter Melody and wife Ana) consists mainly of generating a dazzling succession of bubbles in mind-blowing configurations, filling them with smoke or linking them into long chains. Lasers and flashing colored lights add to the trippy visuals.—David Cote

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

Musical theater does right by the jukebox with this behind-the-music tale, presenting the Four Seasons’ energetic 1960s tunes (including “Walk Like a Man” and “Big Girls Don’t Cry”) as they were meant to be performed. Ten months after concluding an 11-year run on Broadway, the show returned for an open-ended run at Off Broadway's New World Stages. Under Des McAnuff's sleek direction, Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice's biography feels canny instead of canned.—Adam Feldman

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  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Midtown West

A wily cop tries to psych out a possibly homicidal shrink in Warren Manzi’s moldy, convoluted mystery. The creaky welter of dime-store Freudianism, noirish attitude and whodunit gimmickry is showing its age. (Catherine Russell has starred since 1987.)—David Cote

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • Hell's Kitchen

Ah, the joy of watching theater fail. The possibility of malfunction is part of what makes live performance exciting, and Mischief Theatre’s farce takes that notion to extremes as six amateur British actors (and two crew members) perform a hackneyed whodunnit amid escalating calamities. Depending on your tolerance for ceaseless slapstick, The Play That Goes Wrong will either have you rolling in the aisles or rolling your eyes. It is certainly a marvel of coordination: Directed by Mark Bell, the mayhem goes like cuckoo clockwork on Nigel Hook’s ingeniously tumbledown set.—Adam Feldman 

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Stomp
  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • East Village

This shrewd garbage heap of clog dancing, prop comedy and chest-thumping percussion spins out impressive (if numbing) variations on vaudeville by way of English punk.—David Cote

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