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Off Broadway shows, reviews, tickets and listings

Here is where to find reviews, details, schedules, prices and ticket information about Off Broadway shows in New York

Adam Feldman
Written by
Adam Feldman
&
David Cote
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New York theater ranges far beyond the 41 large midtown houses that we call Broadway. Many of the city's most innovative and engaging new plays and musicals can be found Off Broadway, in venues that seat between 100 and 499 people. (Those that seat fewer than 100 people usually fall into the Off-Off Broadway category.) These more intimate spaces present work in a wide range of styles, from new pieces by major artists at the Public Theater or Playwrights Horizons to revivals at the Signature Theatre and crowd-pleasing commercial fare at New World Stages. And even the best Off Broadway shows usually cost less than their cousins on the Great White Way—even if you score cheap Broadway tickets. Use our listings to find reviews, prices, ticket links, curtain times and more for current and upcoming Off Broadway shows.

RECOMMENDED: The 30 Best Off Broadway Shows to See This Spring

NEW OFF BROADWAY SHOWS NOW PLAYING

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

After a successful run at Arizona’s Phoenix Theater Company, this original musical—based on the true story of DREAMer Tony Valdovinos, a young activist for immigrant and student rights—makes it New York City debut. The score is by singer-songwriter Carrie Rodriguez (Lola); the book is by director Michael Barnard, Jonathan Rosenberg and Fernanda Santos. (The former two are also credited with additional lyrics.) Sean Ewing plays the central role in a mostly Latino company of more than 20 actors.

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Chelsea

Comedian Sarah Silverman adapts her 2010 memoir about her adolescent struggle with incontinence—talk about yellow journalism!—into an original musical. Joining her to write the script is Joshua Harmon (Significant Other); the music is by the late Adam Schlesinger (Crazy Ex-Girlfriend), who died of COVID in 2020 and who also shares credit for the lyrics. Anne Kauffman, better known for very serious plays like Mary Jane, directs for the Atlantic. The cast includes The Bedwetter will feature Caissie Levy, Darren Goldstein, Rick Crom and the great Bebe Neuwirth.

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  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Chelsea

Five young Irishwomen in 1850 leave the Great Famine behind for a new life in Australia in  Jaki McCarrick's drama, set on a boat to the other side of the world. Nicola Murphy directs the New York premiere for the Irish Rep. 

  • Theater
  • Interactive
  • East Village

Bated Breath Theatre Company was a leader in pandemic theater with its outdoor West Village walking-tour production Voyeur: The Windows of Toulouse-Lautrec. Now it follows up with another peripatetic theater experience about an artist: writer-director Mara Lieberman's Chasing Andy Warhol, which explores the enigma of the wiggy pop artist and fame industrialist through vignettes of theater, dance and scenic effects in locations throughout the East Village. Groups of audience members are rolled out at 45-minute intervals on each performance day. 

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  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Midtown West

Black students at a decrepit high school navigate the longueurs and dangers of detention in the premiere of Dave Harris's play, whose coming-of-age comedy acquires ominous overtones. Miranda Haymon directs the production for Roundabout Underground; the cast compries MaYaa Boateng, Malik Childs, Mister Fitzgerald, Toney Goins, Galen Ryan Kane and Claudia Logan.

  • Theater
  • Shakespeare
  • Noho

Saheem Ali directs the New York premiere of James Ijames tragicomic riff on Hamlet, which transforms Shakespeare's mopey Dane into a queer Black college kid. The play just won the 2022 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, so snap up tickets while you can. Marcel Spears plays the lead role, Juicy, with a supporting cast that comprises Nikki Crawford, Chris Herbie Holland, Billy Eugene Jones, Adrianna Mitchell, Calvin Leon Smith and Benja Kay Thomas.

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  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Midtown West

An American lawyer hires her willful sister to translate for her in a major class-action lawsuit involving a tech company and the Chinese government in this thriller by Thai-Australian playwright Anchuli Felicia King. May Adrales (Vietgone) directs the U.S. premiere for Manhattan Theatre Club; the cast includes Cindy Cheung, Ruibo Qian, Fang Du and Daniel Jenkins.

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

From the ashes of the St. Luke's Theatre, which shuttered in 2021, rises the new Off Broadway venue Playhouse 46. Its first tenant is the British a cappella musical two-hander Islander, conceived and directed by Amy Draper. Original U.K. stars Kirsty Findlay and Bethany Tennick reprise their portrayals of multiple characters—and also perform live mixing and looping duties—in this tale of the last inhabitant of a remote Scottish island. The book by Stewart Melton, and the score is by Finn Anderson.

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

Conrad Ricamora, Tammy Blanchard and Christian Borle star in the latest revival of this dark, tuneful and utterly winsome 1982 horror-camp musical about a flesh-eating plant who makes dreams come true for a lowly flower-shop worker. Composer Alan Menken and librettist Howard Ashman wrap a sordid tale of capitalist temptation and moral decay in layers of sweetness, humor, wit and camp. Michael Mayer directs the feeding frenzy in this deeply satisfying revival.—Adam Feldman

  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Upper East Side

59E59 devotes its first Volt Festival—which presents three concurrent NYC premieres by a single writer whose work has been underrepresented in the city—to a trio of plays by Karen Hartman. The centerpiece is The Lucky Star, a drama adapted from Richard Hollander’s Every Day Lasts a Year: A Jewish Family’s Correspondence from Poland, which documents his disovery of a trove of letters from his father's Jewish family in Poland during the Holocaust. Previously presented in Chicago and Baltimore under the the title The Book of Joseph, the play moves between past an present to explore a story of immigration and survival. The large cast of this production, directed by Noah Himmelstein, includes Steven Skybell, Danny Gavigan, Nina Hellman, Alexandra Silber, Dale Soules and Stuart Zagnit.

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  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Sunset Park

David Herskovits and his brainy Target Margin Theater conclude their multiyear exploration of The One Thousand and One Nights with multifarious nine-hour experience that wraps its central storytelling in food, drink and music. The show can be experienced either as an all-day event (on Wednesdays and Saturdays) or divided over multiple nights (on Tuesdays and Thursdays); the Saturday marathons on April 30 and May 14 begin at 8pm and last through dawn the next day

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  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

Nikita Burshteyn and Anna Kostakis play the title characters in a musical comedy that transports Verona's lovestruck medieval swain to 1960s Brooklyn, where he falls for the tough daughter of a local crime boss. Mark Saltzman's libretto is set to classic Italian tunes. Justin Ross Cohen directs and choreographs this long-delayed encore run of the show, which premiered Off Broadway in 2020 and has been scheduled to return twice since.

  • Theater
  • Puppet shows
  • Hell's Kitchen

In honor of the late Betty White, producer-puppetmaker Jonathan Rockefeller (Winnie the Pooh) presents a farewell revival of his 2016 puppet tribute to Miami’s fab four, with a new script by Doug Kmiotek that draws on different episodes than the version that played Off Broadway in 2016. Michael Hull directs the show; Miranda Cooper, Dylan Glick, Lu Zielinski and Samantha Lee Mason man deeply felt puppet creations by Rockefeller Productions. 

LONG-RUNNING OFF BROADWAY SHOWS

Blue Man Group
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • Noho

Three deadpan blue-skinned men with extraterrestrial imaginations carry this tourist fave, a show as smart as it is ridiculous. They drum on open tubs of paint, creating splashes of color; they consume Twinkies and Cap'n Crunch; they engulf the audience in a roiling sea of toilet paper. For sheer weird, exuberant fun, it's hard to top this long-running treat. (Note: The playing schedule varies from week to week, with as many as four performances on some days and none on others.)—Adam Feldman

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Hell's Kitchen

Self-described “bubble scientist” Fan Yang's blissfully disarming act (now performed in New York by his son Deni, daughter Melody and wife Ana) consists mainly of generating a dazzling succession of bubbles in mind-blowing configurations, filling them with smoke or linking them into long chains. Lasers and flashing colored lights add to the trippy visuals.—David Cote

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

Musical theater does right by the jukebox with this behind-the-music tale, presenting the Four Seasons’ energetic 1960s tunes (including “Walk Like a Man” and “Big Girls Don’t Cry”) as they were meant to be performed. Ten months after concluding an 11-year run on Broadway, the show returned for an open-ended run at Off Broadway's New World Stages. Under Des McAnuff's sleek direction, Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice's biography feels canny instead of canned.—Adam Feldman

  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • Hell's Kitchen

The Canadian performer Katsura Sunshine, billed as the only Western master of the traditional and rigorously trained Japanese comic stortellying art of Rakugo, performs a weekly show at New World Stages after a year in London’s West End. In keeping with the genre's minimalist practice, Sunshine performs in a kimono using only a fan and a hand towel for props. 

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  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Midtown West

A wily cop tries to psych out a possibly homicidal shrink in Warren Manzi’s moldy, convoluted mystery. The creaky welter of dime-store Freudianism, noirish attitude and whodunit gimmickry is showing its age. (Catherine Russell has starred since 1987.)—David Cote

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Comedy
  • Hell's Kitchen

Ah, the joy of watching theater fail. The possibility of malfunction is part of what makes live performance exciting, and Mischief Theatre’s farce takes that notion to extremes as six amateur British actors (and two crew members) perform a hackneyed whodunnit amid escalating calamities. Depending on your tolerance for ceaseless slapstick, The Play That Goes Wrong will either have you rolling in the aisles or rolling your eyes. It is certainly a marvel of coordination: Directed by Mark Bell, the mayhem goes like cuckoo clockwork on Nigel Hook’s ingeniously tumbledown set.—Adam Feldman 

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Interactive
  • Chelsea

A New York institution since 2011, Punchdrunk’s dark, sleek, gorgeous installation is awe-inspiring in both its size and detail. Silent audience members in creepy white masks are set free in a six-floor labyrinth of wonders, while roving attractive actor-dancers plays out enigmatic scenes inspired by Macbeth and Hitchcock. There are more than 90 different spaces to explore, ranging from a candy shop to a cemetery. There’s no way to absorb it all in a single visit, but that’s all right. You’ll want to go back anyhow.—Adam Feldman

Stomp
  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • East Village

This shrewd garbage heap of clog dancing, prop comedy and chest-thumping percussion spins out impressive (if numbing) variations on vaudeville by way of English punk.—David Cote

UPCOMING OFF BROADWAY SHOWS

  • Theater
  • Drama
  • DUMBO

Berlin’s Schaubühne has long had a reputation as one of the world’s coolest theaters, and its influence has grown in the past 20 years under the leadership of director Thomas Ostermeier, best known known for his outrageous Regietheater deconstructions of classic works. This play, coproduced with Théâtre de la Ville Paris, reunites the director with the French author Édouard Louis (History of Violence), who makes his professional performing debut to examine the plight of the working class in modern France, as exemplified by his own once-fearsome, now-humiliated father. 

  • Theater
  • Shakespeare
  • Lenox Hill

British star director Robert Icke (1984) presents the North American premiere of his acclaimed 2017 London production of Shakespeare's wordy deferred-revenge tragedy, where a ghost and a prince meet and everyone ends in mincemeat. The rising young actor Alex Lawther (The Imitation Game) plays the mopey Dane. The productions runs in rep at the Park Avenue Armory with Icke's Oresteia; Hildegard Bechtler designs the sets and costumes for both.

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  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Hell's Kitchen

Rising star playwright Will Arbery follows the successes of Plano and Heroes of the Fourth Turning with a new play, set in rural Texas, that looks at mourning, caretaking and songwriting through the story of half-siblings—one of whom has Down syndrome—who form a bond with a reclusive artist. The busy Sam Gold, of Broadway's current Macbeth, directs the world premiere at Playwrights Horizons. (A full schedule and ticket prices will be announced on April 5.)

  • Theater
  • Puppet shows
  • Midtown West

The Chicago collective Manual Cinema (Ada/Ava) combines live actors, puppets and filmic techniques to create virtuosic theater experiences. This show, adapted by Sarah Fornace and Drew Dir from two books by the beloved Mo Willems (Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!), is the tale of an incompetent monster in search of someone he can manage to scare. Fornace also directs the show, which features original songs and sound design by Ben Kauffman and Kyle Vegter.

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  • Theater
  • Classical
  • Lenox Hill

Robert Icke (1984) won an Olivier Award for directing this modernized and condensed 2015 version of Aeschylus's seminal three-part tragedy, in which a returning king ends up in a bloodbath and furious recriminations ensue. Lia Williams (Skylight) reprises her critically lauded London performance as the vengeful Klytemnestra, and Hildegard Bechtler designs the sets and costumes; in its North American debut at the Park Avenue Armory, the production runs in rep with Icke's version of Hamlet

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

A high-school outsider strikes up a romance with a fairy-tale prince in this original musical, adapted from the 2012 young-adult book by the best-selling novelist Jodi Picoult and her daughter Samantha Van Leer. The musical's book is by Timothy Allen McDonald, and the score is by Elyssa Samsel and Kate Anderson; Jeff Calhoun directs the production, whose cast includes Arielle Jacobs, Jake David Smith, Julia Murney and NewsRadio's Vicki Lewis.

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Hell's Kitchen

Puppet mastermind Jonathan Rockefeller's adaptation of Disney's A.A. Milne franchise combines low-tech magic—eye-popping puppets, blooming fake flowers, hills covered in literal blankets of snow—with gentle lessons about friendship, teamwork and the importance of fun. For those who grew up watching the films, the musical numbers—especially those by the Sherman Brothers—will spark fuzzy nostalgia. How wonderful that many families' first show after the pandemic can be one that’s so utterly winsome.—Raven Snook 

  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Greenwich Village

The venerable experimental-theater outfit Elevator Repair Service, whose magnificent F. Scott Fitzgerald adaptation Gatz is among the highlights of 21th-century theater in New York, turns its collective eye to The Seagull, Anton Chekhov's group portrait of gloomy artists in a tragicomic daisy chain of she-loves-me-nots. This being an ERS joint, expect elaborately precise sound and movement and plenty of metatheatrical smudging of the lines between characters and performers. 

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