Jesus Christ Superstar

Theater, Musicals
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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 (Photograph: Adam Veness)
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Photograph: Adam Veness
Max DeTogne in Jesus Christ Superstar at Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre
 (Photograph: Adam Veness)
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Photograph: Adam Veness
Donterrio Johnson in Jesus Christ Superstar at Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre
 (Photograph: Adam Veness)
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Photograph: Adam Veness
Danni Smith, Max DeTogne and Michael Ferraro in Jesus Christ Superstar at Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre
 (Photograph: Adam Veness)
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Photograph: Adam Veness
Max DeTogne in Jesus Christ Superstar at Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre
 (Photograph: Adam Veness)
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Photograph: Adam Veness
Khaki Pixley, Will Wilhelm, Tommy Bullington and Sharriese Hamilton in Jesus Christ Superstar at Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre
 (Photograph: Adam Veness)
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Photograph: Adam Veness
Donterrio Johnson, Khaki Pixley, Sharriese Hamilton and Max DeTogne in Jesus Christ Superstar at Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre
 (Photograph: Adam Veness)
7/10
Photograph: Adam Veness
Ryan Armstrong in Jesus Christ Superstar at Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre
 (Photograph: Adam Veness)
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Photograph: Adam Veness
Caleb Baze in Jesus Christ Superstar at Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre
 (Photograph: Adam Veness)
9/10
Photograph: Adam Veness
Max DeTogne in Jesus Christ Superstar at Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre
 (Photograph: Adam Veness)
10/10
Photograph: Adam Veness
Max DeTogne and company in Jesus Christ Superstar at Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre

Try not to get worried and let Theo Ubique's up-close JCS move your soul.

Hosanna, Heysanna, Sanna-Sanna-Ho—let’s acknowledge up front that for all the glory of its concept-album score (still among the few of Lloyd Webber’s I can not just stomach but genuinely love), it’s difficult to Sanna-Sanna-Stage Jesus Christ Superstar without wrestling with its inherent kitsch. Theo Ubique’s new production manages it surprisingly well, largely by dint of adapting the arena-rock stagecraft down to the No Exit Café’s tight constraints; the actors manage their performances, here including Danni Smith’s beautifully empathetic Mary and Max DeTogne’s clarion-voiced Jesus, without the assistance of body mics.

Donterrio Johnson’s Judas is still on the arch side—though nowhere near as over-the-top as Tommy Bullington’s Herod, apparently descended from Elton, Liza and Ethel. But the opportunity to hear this enduring “rock” score rendered mostly sans amplification by a musically rich cast and Jeremy Ramey’s tight band is a praiseworthy development indeed.

Theo Ubique Cabaret Theatre. Music by Andrew Lloyd Webber. Lyrics by Tim Rice. Directed by Fred Anzevino. With Max DeTogne, Donterrio Johnson, Danni Smith. Running time: 2hrs; one intermission.

By: Kris Vire

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Event phone: 800-595-4849
Event website: http://www.theo-u.org
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