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What Millennials are hopeful about

We asked twentysomethings what gives them hope during this economic crisis.

 (Photograph: Andrew Nawrocki)
1/16
Photograph: Andrew Nawrocki

Ashley Houston, 23, has a fashion-design degree, works as a visual assistant at Forever 21
�I hope that some day I can get a line in major boutiques or department stores. It�s a hope, a long-shot hope.�

 

 (Photograph: Nicole Radja)
2/16
Photograph: Nicole Radja

Brian Tram, 22, DePaul University junior, finance/economics major
�Well, seeing how I�m a junior there�s a lot of downsides in finance. [But] despite the people who are cut, there are still jobs being created. Every finance [major] imagines being on Wall Street, but sometimes you have to step back and take the opportunities you�re offered.�

 (Photograph: Nicole Radja)
3/16
Photograph: Nicole Radja

Erin Nedelman, 20, Columbia College sophomore, theater major/art-history minor
�This is a rough economy so why not go for my dreams? With art history, I�d want to curate somewhere like the Art Institute of Chicago. I�m a realist. I know acting isn�t that steady so I�m hoping to have something to fall back on.�

 (Photograph: Andrew Nawrocki)
4/16
Photograph: Andrew Nawrocki

Jared Wallace, 23, has a biology degree, works as a lab researcher and is applying to medical school
�I hope to become a doctor. I think the economy will get worse, but for doctors, hopefully it�ll stay the same.�

 (Photograph: Nicole Schneider)
5/16
Photograph: Nicole Schneider

Lauren Mickels, 26, University of Illinois-Chicago senior, finance major
�I just hope to find a job I enjoy doing. I�ve changed my major so many times so I just want to find a job I can be happy in, something I�m passionate about.�

 (Photograph: Nicole Radja)
6/16
Photograph: Nicole Radja

Meghan Burton, 20, DePaul University junior, marketing major
�I hope there�s more job opportunities and the economy recovers. As of right now I�m not completely hopeful. I don�t want to be stuck in a dead-end job. I want to be able to move up.�

 (Photograph: Nicole Radja)
7/16
Photograph: Nicole Radja

Rachel Pieczura, 18, Roosevelt University freshman, political-science major
�I�m going to be famous someday, mark that. I will make it big and be famous for music, but for a certain artistry. I want to represent the outcasts, but not just the outcasts, the outcasts of the outcasts. Eventually I want to be part of the Senate�right now that�s a shady business.�

 (Photograph: Nicole Schneider)
8/16
Photograph: Nicole Schneider

Raven Harper, 25, Illinois Institute of Art-Chicago senior, film major
�Just finding a nice place to work. Usually you have to work your way up. I don�t even want to pay my dues, really, but for me that would be assistant editor or producer, which I�m okay with, but I ultimately want to write and direct.�

 (Photograph: Nicole Radja)
9/16
Photograph: Nicole Radja

Rosemary Farrell, 22, School of the Art Institute of Chicago senior, focus in accessory design
�I recently returned from spending eight months in Italy, and I�ve realized that I want to move abroad. I�m trying to set up a job teaching English in Istanbul so I can set up a base for jewelry design. There�s a demand for that there, so hopefully I�ll find a foundation.�

 (Photograph: Nicole Radja)
10/16
Photograph: Nicole Radja

Ryan Mazurkiewicz, 18, Roosevelt University freshman, undeclared major
�Being undecided, I�m not positive. I�m getting interested in history, and I�m looking into job availability because I�m really worried about picking a major and there not being any available jobs.�

 (Photograph: Nicole Radja)
11/16
Photograph: Nicole Radja

Ryan Davis, 23, has an art history/African-American studies degree, works at Topshop and as a freelance writer
�I guess I�m just hopeful that I can get a �real job� and go back to school. I hope to do research, read and write books.�

 (Photograph: Andrew Nawrocki)
12/16
Photograph: Andrew Nawrocki

Sara Schroeder, 22, has a philosophy/religious-studies degree, unemployed
�I�m hopeful I�ll be able to work to live, not live to work. That�s the simplest way to put it. We�re overstimulated and overworked; that�s not what our parents� generation wanted for us.�

 (Photograph: Andrew Nawrocki)
13/16
Photograph: Andrew Nawrocki

Sebastian Clark, 24, has an English degree, works as a food demonstrator for gourmet dip-mix company the Pantry Club
�I hope to go to grad school to [study writing]. I just moved to Chicago so I�m trying to get my feet on the ground. I�m waiting for the perfect job, which for me would be teaching, so I need to go to grad school.�

 (Photograph: Nicole Schneider)
14/16
Photograph: Nicole Schneider

Molly Wallace, 20, Columbia College sophomore, theater major
�Coming here and being in the city, I�m very hopeful I�ll be making a decent living. Columbia really focuses on helping students get connections. I�m not going to be a waitress trying to be an actress�I�m confident I can do it.�

 (Photograph: Nicole Schneider)
15/16
Photograph: Nicole Schneider

Paul Sullivan, 20, Columbia College sophomore, film-production major
�I�d like to make a decent living and be happy and successful in my career path�to be as successful as I can be but not let my success be defined by wealth. It wouldn�t be a bad thing to make good money, but if you�re not happy it�s not worth it.�

 (Photograph: Andrew Nawrocki)
16/16
Photograph: Andrew Nawrocki

Sarah Bockel, 23, has a music/theater degree, works on shows at the Shedd Aquarium and as a server at Rosebud restaurant
�If I stick around long enough and work hard enough and know enough people, I�ll succeed. The great thing is there is never a lack of art, even in hard times, but still, a lot just doesn�t pay well. I hope the job pay gets better.�

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