Rogoznica, Sibenik county
@ Croatian Tourist board

Top 10 things to do in Rogoznica

Fall in love with Rogoznica

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Written by
Lara Rasin
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Croatia’s coastal town of Rogoznica receives 2600 hours of sunlight per year. During the summer months, there are only four to seven rainy days on average. Already ready to set off to Rogoznica? Let our list of the top 10 things to do help your vacation planning.

Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere.

You can also find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world, or take a look at our list of the 50 best things to do in the world right now.

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Brightly coloured Dragon’s Eye is one of Rogoznica’s most popular tourist destinations. This saltwater, oval-shaped lake is located on the peninsula of Gradina. Cliffs ranging anywhere from 4 to 24 metres tower flank the lake. According to legend, two brothers were fighting over land ownership. One brother tricked the other who then, in revenge, conjured a curse and turned the land into the lake known today as Dragon’s Eye – which was home to a merciless dragon. At this site, numerous recreational – and dare-devilish – activities are available, cliff diving the most popular among them.

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Rogoznica’s many mythical tales continue with Cape Planka. Homer’s Iliad depicts Trojan war hero Diomedes sailing around an area of coast which is considered to be Cape Planka. This is how the cape came to be known as Diomede’s Cape to Greek sailors visiting the area as early as the 6th century BC. In the following centuries, various Greek historians and scholars, including Timaeus and Eratosthenes, flocked to the cape to study – and ogle – its natural beauty and mystery. Today, visitors come from near and far come to observe the area and its adjacent Gothic-style Church of St. John.

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Marina Frapa, aptly dubbed “royalty among the Adriatic marinas”, sports more than just a great harbour. The centre of the marina is an artificial island featuring a reception area, a control tower, servicing and catering facilities and the grand Otok Hotel (translating to island). The onshore facilities feature another hotel, called “Kopno” (translating to land), a swimming pool complex, a nightclub, a luxury sports centre and a conference hall. The marina and its facilities are open year-round as an added bonus – so there’s no problem if you wish to avoid crowds and visit off-season.

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After a day worth of exploring Rogoznica’s surroundings and the bustling Marina Frapa, you may be in need of a drink and a dance (or a few). At Admiral, a disco located right within this hip harbour, you can party from dusk to dawn. The club is surrounded by the Adriatic and plenty of palm trees. Keep in mind, though, that like many Croatian clubs, Admiral usually doesn’t fill up until past midnight. While you wait, sip some cocktails as the sun drops and when the time comes, dance the night away.

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In January of 1942, an Italian transport ship called Nuncio was brought down by a British submarine between the Mulo lighthouse and the island of Velika Smokvica (literally translating to large-small fig). It wasn’t until 2008 that the wreck was finally discovered. This sunken ship, along with many others from various time periods, which are located under Rogoznica’s waters, have prompted the area to be called “the museum in the sea”. Diving is allowed in these waters; most of the divers are tourists and (unsurprisingly) scholars.

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For a more serene seaside experience during the summer, head to the nearby village of Zatoglav. Located on the eastern part of Rogoznica bay, it sits a mere five kilometre from Rogoznica’s centre by road and less than one kilometre by sea. A far cry from the hustle and bustle of large tourist cities, Zatoglav makes it so that the only things on your to-do list are swimming, sunbathing and sleeping. The state of relaxation continues in any of the private apartments and holiday houses, many of which are seaside; most showcase vistas of the Adriatic and the Rogoznica peninsula.

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Just a ten-minute drive away from Rogoznica sits one of the region’s culinary hotspots. The award-winning Šarićevi Dvori restaurant is led by the Šarić family, pioneers of local agritourism. The restaurant’s focus are traditional methods of preparing food with fresh Dalmatian herbs and ancient recipes, like fresh octopus salad. Wash it all down with a famous Babić red wine. Another of the restaurant’s specialties are olives in all shapes and forms: green, black, fresh and in virgin olive oil form.

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Explore the gem of Rogoznica’s Staro Selo (Old Village) by visiting the Church of St. Nicholas, situated northwest of the peninsula in Lozica bay. This historic, Gothic-style church is thought to have been built in the 14th century – but some historians consider it to be even older. From the 1300s to the 1600s, it served as a parish church for those who immigrated to the area after fleeing Ottoman attacks. Next to the church are unique tombstones written in Gothic script (and featuring astronomic symbols); these inscriptions are considered very rare for the time period.

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Let your mind, body and soul find peace at one of the endless secluded coves on Jaz island. The uninhabited paradise  sits a mere four kilometres away from the centre of Rogoznica. The island offers total privacy, pine tree shade for when you need a break from the sizzling sun and clear waters. The island’s most unique feature is its proximity to the coast. Visitors can cross over to the island without a boat; instead they can walk to it.

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This religious procession is celebrated in Rogoznica every July and dates back to an 18th-century legend. The story begins in 1772, when a fisherman working on Cape Gradina stumbled upon a rock where a painting of Our Lady laid. Intrigued, the fisherman took the painting home with him, but to his surprise, the image ended up back on the rock. This was repeated three more times. Today, the religious myth is celebrated with a procession attended by priests, volunteers, believers and tourists.

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