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Vis bar and club guide

Where to drink in Vis, with Time Out Croatia's guide to the best bars and nightclubs on the island

© Vanda Vucicevic/Time Out

Vis is a happening destination when it comes to bars, with several solid places to enjoy a beverage. Bejbi, just across from the ferry, is where to sink a few with locals and internationals. In Komiža, Corto Maltese is a good choice for cocktails among the younger set, while hipster cafe-bar-cum-restaurant Fabrika is good for coffee and cocktails. Aquarius is the only place to truly party on Vis island, a club where traditional island life and big-city rave intersect.

Where to drink in Vis...

Caffè Bar Bejbi

A comfortable dive in the working section of the harbour by the docks, Bejbi (‘bay-bee’) bustles day and night with people who like to drink and gab. The thatched terrace has its own bar and harbour view, and a new, retro-modern mural. Find pool tables, moody jazz and bossa nova in the large indoor bar. Usually one of the last places to close, this is where all the other parties continue. A worthy stop on any serious bar crawl, it can offer quality cocktails and occasional live acts playing funky rock.

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Vis Town

Lambik

This ancient-looking courtyard and grape arbour – formerly the 16th-century villa of Croatian poet Hanibal Lučić – is one of the more entertaining and idiosyncratic bars on the island, ably run by a charming young brother-and-sister team who enjoy partying late with their equally young guests. It is also one of the most attractive. Low tables and comfortable wicker chairs spill out onto this pleasant square in Kut, at night a place of drunken singing and snogging. An atmospheric, vine-draped arcade has tables and chairs scattered among dimly lit columns and arches while an indoor bar area encourages mingling and dancing. The bar serves late, and you may be offered home-made grappa. Predictably average dance music is often provided by local DJs.

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Split

Caffè Bar Biliba

This convenient and convivial terrace, next to the Hotel Tamaris, fills Trg Klapavica square, on the sea in Luka. 
The indoor section is around the corner, and there is more outdoor seating along the steep, pleasantly shaded stone streets of the Old Town. The location and friendly service attract a large local crowd, even during the day, when most other places in Vis town are closed or nearly empty. Internet access is available from computers in the back of the building, while the wide-screen TV is usually tuned to international sports events.

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Vis Town

Zadruga

The newest, most chic and most expensive place to drink in Komiža is this bar and pizzeria on the Riva, next to the communal press where locals bring their grapes after harvest. Beyond the big doors, wooden tables and chairs are scattered on a slightly ramshackle terrace, below murals and a giant sundial, with a bar inside. Don’t be put off by the mellow rock background.

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Komiza

Paradajz Lost

With tables spread across the piazza behind the crenellated Perast Tower, this art gallery-cum-wine bar with a play-on-words name  (paradajz meaning 'tomato' in the Dalmatian dialect) is a great new reinforcement to the boho side of Vis's personality. Mix-and-match furniture, atmospheric lighting and music from the owner's vinyl record collection create a mellow, outdoor-living-room feel. The list of predominantly local wines is well worth ploughing through.

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Vis Town

Corto Maltese Cocktail Bar

The place to grab a drink among young locals, the Corto Maltese Cocktail Bar is decorated with silhouettes of the comic-book adventurer of the same name. There are outdoor tables set up between pine trees on the promenade overlooking the sea – very romantic. Indoors, there’s a dartboard,  a bank of red-booth seating and red walls surround a U-shaped bar, where owner Toni and his merry crew serve up recommendable cocktails and dispense standard beers and wines. Later on, as the crowd begins to weed out, make sure you hang around for the disco music and order a top-secret Corto Maltese.

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Komiza

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