Night vision: four Israeli art collectives that double as nightlife hot spots

They say alcohol inspires creativity, these four art collectives take that to heart
Beit Kandinof
© PR Beit Kandinof
By Time Out Israel Writers |
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Art collectives that double as nightlife hot spots are sprouting all over Tel Aviv and Jaffa. A funky fresh private studio space on the edge of the hip Florentin area, a mishmash of culinary and creative arts, and a modern guest house in Jaffa are just the start. Here’s a rundown of the spaces to know, where you can get your Israeli culture fix and drink on in one fell swoop. 

The art of drinking

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Sussie's
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Sussie's Art Bay

All across the globe, authors, painters, musicians and creators escape their everyday city stresses to retreat into utter isolation. Whether that means bunking up in a rustic cabin in Northern Ireland or finding solace in an Artist’s House in Jerusalem, “Artist Retreats” cast distractions to the wind to make way for focused work within a community of like-minded innovators. As the “Start-up Nation,” Israel is a cut above the rest when it comes to innovation. Which is where Sussie’s Art Bay comes in.

Sussies’s has extracted the magic that flows through these secluded Artist Retreats set apart from society and injected it into a communal urban setting with a goal of redefining creativity. While many collaborative art spaces favor a specific medium, the 20 private studios and shared exhibition space that make up Sussie’s welcome a multi-dimensional group of artists.

Step inside Noga Erez’s audiovisual collaboration with local Israeli artists; explore the feelings of unsettled impermanence in Rebecca Brodski’s in-between; breath music with Israeli multi-instrumentalist Joseph E-Shine as you weave through the web of intimate studios that expose the artists’ beautiful vulnerabilities at their rawest. The collaborative art complex enlightens artists to create in new ways, opening up the floor so that the artist just might “enter as a photographer and leave as a sound designer.”

Beit Romano, 2nd floor, 9 Derech Yaffo St, Tel Aviv (050-7710108/sussiesartbay.com)

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Beit Kandinof
© Rotem Manor

Beit Kandinoff

Imagine everything that makes Jaffa and the White City culturally unique: incredible museums, wild and wonderful art galleries, bustling bars, and chef-quality restaurants. Now imagine them mixed together in a cultural melting pot, all under the same roof. This was the dream of power couple Amir Erlich and Arianna Fornaciai when they stumbled across the Jaffa palace-like building that once belonged to Aaron Kandinof, the son of the Minister of Finance of Muzaffar Khan, ruler of Bukhara.

Amir comes from the restaurant and nightlife business, while Arianna is an artist and the daughter of a renowned gallery owner from Florence, Italy. The two have combined their creative minds to produce Beit Kandinof: an artists’ studio, art space with changing exhibitions, center for classes and lectures, and a Jaffa bar and restaurant that will operate into the night.

With a handcrafted menu by the talented and promising chef Omri McNabb, who was  previously the sous-chef at Popina, Beit Kandinof ticks off all the must-have variables when it comes the best for culture junkies.

14 Hastorfim St, Jaffa (03-6502938/ beitkandinof.com)

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Red House
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The Red House

While the city of Tel Aviv is in no shortage of talented and creative residents whose art is their passion, artists in the metropolis are forever on the lookout for a source of inspiration and a place where they can congregate. One such spot they are very lucky to have is the Red House, an alternative and hip arts and culture center situated right in the midst of South Tel Aviv’s new hipster haven- the Shapira neighborhood.

The scenic arts hub has been accentuating the gritty and offbeat charm of Shapira for quite a while now, having opened its doors to arty business in October of 2016. But in fact, the center has 200 years of impressive history to boast of- the building it is located in served as one of the thirty well houses that were built in the city back in the 19th century. At the time, it was mostly known as the “Sheikh Murad House,” and after it was covered with red plaster it received the nickname it now officially goes by.

Today, the Red House is an arts-based community center where exhibitions, theater shows, music concerts and art installations are on prominent display. It is also home to the Red Gallery, which showcases contemporary art exhibitions crafted by local and international artists. 

35 Yisrael Misalant St, Tel Aviv (facebook.com/the.red.red.house)

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Yafo Creative
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Yafo Creative

Tel Aviv has a notorious reputation for being the “city that does not sleep,” and first-time visitors to the White City join locals in attesting to the fact that one of the metropolis’ many charms is the feeling it evokes of being full of rare treasures that are just waiting to be discovered at random. One such gem that is also truly reflective of the city’s homogeneous texture and multi-cultural affluence is the Yafo Creative, a modern guest house in Jaffa that doubles as a creative content center that has formed, over time, an urban community of interdisciplinary artists and art lovers.

The Yafo Creative was founded in 2014 by Amnon Ron, an Israeli filmmaker who took the beautiful architectural structure that belonged to his family and turned it into the production hub and intimate, bohemian hotel that it now is. While the guest house does feature four elegant rooms to dwell in for a unique retreat, its focal point is its prolific artistic activity.

The Yafo Creative serves as a meeting venue for local as well as international artists from different fields to convene, exchange ideas and engage in dialogue. It has housed hundreds of spontaneous music shows, art exhibitions, theatrical productions and other cultural events, and is fondly known for its monthly “creative dinners” that are a culinary celebration of city life followed by a changing artistic program. 

33 Shivtei Israel St, Jaffa (yafocreative.com)

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