Movie theaters and screenings in Philadelphia

Your guide to all things film-related in Philly, whether you're after the latest blockbuster or an indie flick

The 25 best summer movies of 2018
Movies

The 25 best summer movies of 2018

From Hollywood’s boom factory to the indie fringe, here are the summer flicks you absolutely can’t miss

The 100 best movies on Netflix right now
Movies

The 100 best movies on Netflix right now

So many options, but which to pick? Consult our ranked list of the very best movies on Netflix streaming.

The best new movies to see in theaters this month
Movies

The best new movies to see in theaters this month

Vital indies, the return of Michelle Pfeiffer and some terrific horror make April a month of spring awakening

The 12 best movie theaters in Philadelphia
Movie theaters

The 12 best movie theaters in Philadelphia

Whether you want a big blockbuster or a moving indie flick, find it in the best movie theaters Philadelphia has to offer

The 25 most essential Philadelphia movies
Movies

The 25 most essential Philadelphia movies

The quintessential movies—from the ones you know to a handful of overlooked gems

New movies we love

BlacKkKlansman
Movies

BlacKkKlansman

If you’ve been pining for the return of the fiery, political Spike Lee of Do the Right Thing and Malcolm X, good news: BlacKkKlansman is the director working at his electrifying best. Maybe the optimism of the Obama era robbed him of some of that righteous fury (which would be one explanation for his limp Oldboy remake), or maybe middle age mellowed him; either way, Trump’s America—Charlottesville, Black Lives Matter and everything else—has brought the old mojo flooding back. Veering from a blaxploitation spoof to an undercover thriller and ending with a no-punches-pulled real-life coda, BlacKkKlansman is riotously fun one minute, savagely biting the next. The story, as the opening credits declare, is based on some “fo’ real, fo’ real sh*t”—the kind that’s hard to believe actually happened in early ’70s Colorado, yet it’s all true. Black police officer Ron Stallworth (John David Washington, son of Denzel) joins the local force, where he’s warned that he’ll have to “take a lot of guff.” Sure enough, the guff comes thick and fast as he’s exiled to the storage room and harassed by a racist colleague. Spotting an ad for the local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan and taking the initiative, Ron phones the “Organization” (as they vaguely describe themselves), clears his throat and claims to be a vitriolic white supremacist, thus setting in motion the most unlikely undercover operation in law-enforcement history. His first thrill of contact with the enemy is only slightly diminished by

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
The Wife
Movies

The Wife

Glenn Close is the power behind the throne in this absorbing study of a complex marriage. She’s Joan, the wife of a feted novelist, Joe Castleman (Jonathan Pryce), who’s soon to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Together with their sulky son David (Max Irons), the American couple fly to Stockholm for a whirlwind of press, functions and rehearsals—but the most telling moments happen when they're alone together in their hotel room. While Meg Wolitzer’s source novel is written in Joan’s voice, The Wife resists narration and allows Joan to internalize her feelings, ranging from affection, concern and duty to bitterness and rage. It’s a smart move: Close’s piercing eyes dart around with telling expressions while Joe blusters on obliviously, enjoying the attention of sycophants. Not much, though, gets past Nathaniel (Christian Slater), a writer planning a biography on Joe. He shadows the couple and waits for his moment to pounce. Slater gives what could have been a stereotypical role plenty of spark, and his scenes with Close are riveting. The Wife is also very funny, not least when the Castlemans are woken by a group of traditional singers belting out "Santa Lucia" around their bed. Less successful are the flashbacks to the couple’s past in the late 50s. The younger Joe (Harry Lloyd) doesn’t seem nearly charismatic enough to sweep Joan (Annie Starke) off her feet. That said, these scenes play an important part in a story with a satisfying sting in its tail, one that mak

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Eighth Grade
Movies

Eighth Grade

Kayla is exactly the wrong girl to be posting YouTube videos about "confidence" or "being yourself," but you'll absolutely love her for trying. As played in the sweetly sympathetic Eighth Grade by then-13-year-old Elsie Fisher (hatching a guileless, emotionally exposed performance that could be underrated due to the film's documentary-like rawness), Kayla is a heartbreaking flow of awkward ums, likes and circular brain farts. She turns the act of speech into an alien process. As the lens widens out, Kayla's shyness comes into sharper view: the post-it notes dotting her mirror reminding her to practice small talk and jokes, and Fisher's own inchoate physicality—a pimply, round face that contains hints of the pre-flame-out Lindsay Lohan. Writer-director Bo Burnham's debut feature tracks Kayla during her final week of middle school, a transitional moment fraught with anxiety. If his episodic building blocks are a touch familiar, Burnham can't be beat for mouth-breathing naturalism, steering Eighth Grade into the squirmy company of Kids, Catherine Breillat's Fat Girl and Welcome to the Dollhouse (all of them tougher movies, but about real teens, as is this). A birthday pool party becomes Kayla's slow-motion nightmare, as she's surrounded by soda-swigging peers who are nonetheless further down the road of maturity. Caught in the act of practicing blow jobs on a banana by her single dad (Josh Hamilton, who nails a tricky climactic monologue), she flings the fruit at his chest, whi

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Mission: Impossible—Fallout
Movies

Mission: Impossible—Fallout

Tom Cruise is 56 years old. Fifty. Six. And he’s been making Mission: Impossible movies for 22 of those 56 years. By all rights, Fallout, his sixth high-flying mission, should be to M:I what A View to a Kill was to Roger Moore’s James Bond run (Moore being only a year older than Cruise is when he made his final 007): tired, creaky and a bit embarrassing. Astonishingly, however, the opposite is true. This is easily the best, slickest and most daring Mission: Impossible installment. Not only that, it’s the finest action movie of the year so far. The plot pulls off twist after twist, with Cruise's Ethan Hunt still haunted by his now-incarcerated Rogue Nation nemesis Solomon Lane (a superbly creepy Sean Harris) and dealing with the global terrorist power vacuum left by Lane’s capture. But you won’t care about any of these details with all the sinew-straining spectacle on display. This is thanks largely to writer-director Christopher McQuarrie. Being the first director to return for a second go at the franchise, he brings a sense of continuity hitherto lacking. Fallout is a direct sequel to Rogue Nation, bringing back most of the key players and upping the stakes from the most knowing of perspectives. McQuarrie also builds on the last film’s self-aware level of wit and, most importantly, its set-piece-crafting sophistication. No action sequence is allowed to peter out, or be chopped to ribbons in the editing, or lean on the crutch of CG augmentation. From a frantic Parisian cha

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Won’t You Be My Neighbor?
Movies

Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

With its focus on Fred Rogers, the children’s television host who extolled the virtues of positivity, Won’t You Be My Neighbor? is undeniably well timed. It doesn’t have to strain at all for immediate relevance. Early in Morgan Neville’s heartfelt, moving documentary, we see scenes from one of the first episodes of Misterogers’ Neighborhood (as it was spelled at the time) in which puppet character King Friday XIII builds a wall to keep out those he finds undesirable, before kindness brings it down again. This segment of low-budget ’60s TV carries a message we need now more than ever. If it seems egregious to approach Rogers and his show with a political reading, Won’t You Be My Neighbor? may surprise even those who grew up watching the series, with its revelation of the many world events and concerns it addressed. In his gentle, empathetic way, Rogers helped little ones deal with everything from Vietnam to 9/11. After Robert Kennedy was gunned down, one puppet’s plea for a definition of “assassination” was compassionately answered. Rogers was devoted to the innocence of childhood, but he also knew there was no way to shield kids from the ugliness of the adult world. He offered a calm, reassuring buffer to it. Neville shone a spotlight on under-celebrated talent in his Oscar-winning 20 Feet from Stardom, and here he paints an equally compassionate portrait of one of American popular culture’s most familiar faces. Through interviews with those who knew Rogers (and vintage on-

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars

The best of the movies

The 50 most romantic movies of all time
Movies

The 50 most romantic movies of all time

What films made Humphrey Bogart the man of our dreams and had Woody Allen turn us into hopeless romantics? Check out our top picks of the most romantic movies of all time.

The best and worst Woody Allen movies
Movies

The best and worst Woody Allen movies

From nourishment to nebbishment (and all points in between)

The best and worst Alfred Hitchcock movies
Movies

The best and worst Alfred Hitchcock movies

We rank the Hitchcock features, from his iconic thrillers to the lesser-known silents

The 50 best fantasy movies
Movies

The 50 best fantasy movies

These are cinema’s most fabulously fantastical flights of fancy

The 30 best summer blockbusters ever
Movies

The 30 best summer blockbusters ever

The movies designed for maximum impact—from sci-fi films to comedies