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Katie Dailey

Katie Dailey

Articles (8)

El estilo de David Bowie

El estilo de David Bowie

Desde el sureste de Londres para el espacio exterior, David Bowie fue la estrella de rock más grande en reinventarse. Katie Dailey le rinde tributo a las siete eras del hombre de las estrellas, con sus trajes más representativos.

The seven ages of David Bowie

The seven ages of David Bowie

From south-east London to outer space, David Bowie was rock’s greatest self-reinventor. Katie Dailey pays tribute to the seven ages of the original starman, with featured outfits and pictures from the V&A’s 2013 blockbuster Bowie retrospective.

Our top ten homeware picks from Etsy

Our top ten homeware picks from Etsy

Whether you're looking to jazz up your rented pad or give your own piece of the capital the cribs treatment, we've picked the best homewares that Etsy has to offer to make sure that where you lay your head is as pleasant as possible. 

The 12 necklaces of Valentine's Day

The 12 necklaces of Valentine's Day

Whether you love it or loathe it, it won't have escaped your notice that Valentine's Day (Sun Feb 14 2016) is almost here. To celebrate, here's 12 of the prettiest pendants from some of London's loveliest independent jewellery designers.

Spitalfields Market: an insider's guide

Spitalfields Market: an insider's guide

The lowdown It is the best of markets, it is the worst of markets. Since the 2003 renovation and total overhaul of the much loved Spitalfields Market, it’s a leaner, cleaner, Norman Foster-designed affair, bulked out with slightly soulless boutiques and missing the majority of its displaced stallholders. It now offers a different shopping experience, but by no means a bad one. With the feel of a mall-with-market, it is now neatly cleaved in two by a slick of chain restaurants like Canteen and The Real Greek. On one side lies an arcade of smart shops and eateries bordered with orderly market stalls (Spitalfields), and on the other, a cross section of stalls crammed into Old Spitalfields, the last remaining portion of the original market. A pitch here is expensive, meaning that Sunday stalls are fairly safe bets: gastro-nibbles, wittily sloganed baby T-shirts and leather bags. Sunday is also when the market becomes a melting pot of young designers; with achingly cool handmade clothes, vintage  accessories and jewellery, it’s like a Topshop Oxford Circus for indie hipsters. If you want to avoid the crowds and come across some more idiosyncratic finds, then forget the popular Sunday market and come on a Thursday – this is where you’ll find heaps of vintage fashion, a great selection of antiques and space to breath and browse around this quite spectacular development. A downside: the market’s ATMs, which notoriously run dry or sport queues of epic proportions. Bring cash!The marke

London's best budget beauty salons

London's best budget beauty salons

Looking for a cheap beauty treatment in London? Whether you want to get your muscles pummelled with a budget massage or whip your brows into shape on a budget, the selection of cut-price primping palaces below will have you looking and feeling your best in no time. Got a little more to spend? Check out our guides to London's best spas, waxers, hairdressers and nail salons. 

Listings and reviews (3)

Prism

Prism

‘It started with spectacles, because I have to wear glasses and I couldn’t find any. Every time I liked a friend’s pair, they were vintage – which meant I couldn’t buy them. So I eventually just produced my own.’ Designer Anna Laub is showing me round her store on burgeoning style-hotspot Chiltern Street (also home to the André Balazs hotel Chiltern Firehouse, as well as armfuls of independent fashion retailers for the connoisseur). Like Coco Chanel, who famously looked in her wardrobe and designed what was missing, Laub has quickly found a market for a clothing label designed completely according to her own wish list. After specs, she designed sunglasses, and then swimwear, when she struggled (like most women) to find decently fitting bikinis for her body shape. ‘You wouldn’t buy a T-shirt and trousers in a set, so why buy a bikini top and bottom in one? It doesn’t make sense.’ So Laub designed the dream swimwear collection for the non-standard sized woman – that is, almost all of us. On one rail in the store, there are 12 variations of the same bikini – including skimpy bottoms, normal briefs, ’50s style pants and jumbo retro granny pants – each named after a holiday destination (Positano, St Tropez, Honolulu…) These can be matched with triangle tops, bandeaux, bras and moulded cups, according to taste and wobbly bits. At around £150 a set, it’s more expensive than a £40 off-the-peg pair from Next, but a bikini presents women at their most exposed, and despite being the sma

Victoria Beckham

Victoria Beckham

It has taken a year to transform Number 36 Dover Street from a traditional fishing gear shop into the VB mothership, and the designer chose conceptual female architect Farshid Moussavi for the job (who also worked on the Olympic park). The risk of commissioning someone who had never worked in retail before has paid off – the space is stunning, with a dramatic atrium that runs the height of the building. The basement will serve as a space for pop-ups and a personal shopping suite. The ground floor currently houses a wall of luxury accessories and an edit of the slightly cheaper Victoria by Victoria Beckham label, while the first floor features her catwalk collection – also recognisable from its many outings on Hollywood’s finest. VB's experience as a devoted shopper has obviously inspired some of the features in store, including a capacious changing room. In each room, as well as jumbo mirrors and careful lighting, there are chairs and benches ‘for a child to sit on’, she explains. Over by the rails, there is more seating – ‘so that a husband can wait while his wife is looking at a dress’. There are more nods to the idea of the indulgent husband – assistants are trained to spot a helpless man, and ‘help them select the right piece, take them through the collections’. Beckham has joked in the press about getting her family behind the till – a likely story. But it’s a fair bet that visitors to the store will catch a glimpse of its proprietress. With the family seat firmly restor

Foyles Charing Cross Road

Foyles Charing Cross Road

If the old Foyles was a bookish uncle in a soup-stained cardigan, the new Foyles is a hip teenage cousin: ahead of the curve where apps and indie cinema are concerned, but sporting a pair of off-puttingly flash trainers. Foyles has always been one of those shops that trades partly on sentiment, with its labyrinthine layout, oddball-friendly café and loyal staff: Giles Armstrong, manager of the foreign languages department and Foyles' longest serving, had clocked up an impressive half-century on the payroll in 2015. News that Foyles was moving, and its much-loved café closing, was greeted with understandable dismay by Time Out readers, but standing in the vast, updated premises (just a couple of doors down from the old one, in the former Central Saint Martins HQ) it's easy to understand the decision. Foyles CEO Sam
 Husain describes the new store
 as ‘a bookshop for the twenty-first
 century’, with 37,000 square feet of floorspace laid out immaculately by architects Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands around an impressive central atrium, and eight levels (four actual floors) packed with more than 200,000 books. Wherever you stand, you can see every part of the building, and the place is bathed in a gentle, contemplation-inducing glow. It’s light years away from the dusty nooks and crannies of the old building, and a bold visual statement of Foyles’s ambition and new image.In the age of the e-reader and Amazon, punters need a good reason to visit a bookshop, and the new story has ple

News (1)

Broga: London's yoga classes for men

Broga: London's yoga classes for men

Yoga - that's what girls do so they can feel like they've exercised without breaking a sweat, and basically get a sweet lie down for half an hour with a lavender eyebag, right? Wrong. We desk-dwelling urbanites could all benefit from a bit of stretching and pulling in the right directions – particularly those of the hairier sex who complain of back troubles and ride bikes until their hamstrings are tighter than a gnat's arse. But what to do if yoga just doesn't feel butch enough for you? Or you don't want any girls to see that you're 20 centimetres off touching your toes? Enter Yoga For Real Men, at Clapton's MKII gallery, a twice-weekly session designed to combine the more physical aspects of yoga with endurance building exercises (like manly push-ups *hrrrrrrrrrr* and muscular planks *hyeeeaahhhhhh*) and a lot of stretching. Classes are drop-in, cost a tenner (that's cheap in yoga pounds) and are strictly for the lads. MKII, 71 Powerscroft Rd, E5 0PT. Mondays, 8pm, Wednesdays, 8am. Book your place be emailing: yogaforrealman@gmail.com. More yoga for tough guys: Blue Cow Yoga This studio is located slap bang in the city, and is aimed at reinvigorating people whose job titles come in two to three characters, and whose default state is stressed and knackered. Broga This gruelling yoga-based workout is aimed at chaps, but girls can come along if they think they're hard enough. That said, the motto of the brand (founded by Californian man-mountain Matt 'The Pillar' Miller) is to