teamLab
Photo: teamLab, 'Proliferating Immense Life - A Whole Year per Year'

teamLab Borderless in Tokyo is getting a fresh spring look from March

The seasonal digital art installations will feature pink sakura blossoms, peonies and other spring scenery

By
Emma Steen
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The immersive digital art at teamLab Borderless in Odaiba is ever-changing as it adapts to how the museum visitors interact with the space. The cutting-edge museum is designed in such a way that no visuals will be repeated in the exact same way.

teamLab
Photo: teamLab, 'Flowers in Layered Ultrasubjective Space'

There’s more: while the artwork shifts continuously with viewer participation, it also changes along with the seasons. Starting March 1, the exhibits at teamLab Borderless will reflect the spring season with a fresh array of flowers and scenery. 

teamLab
Photo: teamLab, 'Forest of Resonating Lamps'

One of the most celebrated aspects of spring in Japan is the arrival of cherry blossoms, which only appear fleetingly for a week or so between March and May. To celebrate the iconic blossom, the infinity room titled ‘Forest of Resonating Lamps’ will have its lights emanate a bright pink colour from March to April (longer than the actual lifespan of the sakura flowers, thankfully). 

teamLab
Photo: teamLab, 'Memory of Topography'

Memory of Topography’ will also feature delicate pink cherry blossoms, as well as other spring scenery such as rapeseed blossoms, lavender, vibrant green rice terraces and swimming crucian carp. 

teamLab
Photo: teamLab, 'Proliferating Immense Life - A Whole Year per Year'

It’s not all sakura, though. ‘Proliferating Immense Life – A Whole Year per Year’, an artwork that features different species of flowers every month, will welcome blooming rapeseed in March and peonies in April. At this installation, you can witness the lifespan of a flower – when you tap on one, the flower will wither and die, only to make room for a new blossom to grow. 

As a preventative measure against Covid-19, teamLab Borderless is currently only admitting half the usual number of visitors. In addition, all surfaces inside the museum have been given an antiviral coating. As is typical of coronavirus protocol, temperatures will be checked on entry while all staff and visitors are required to disinfect their hands and wear a mask. Be sure to exercise caution when planning your visit.

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