1. マリトッツオ
    Photo: Keisuke Tanigawa
  2. なんすかぱんすか
    Photo: Keisuke Tanigawaマリトッツオ『ジャンドゥージャ&ブラッドオレンジ』(左)、『リモーネ』(右)| Nansuca Pansuca

8 best maritozzo cream buns in Tokyo

These Italian cream buns are having a moment in Tokyo. Here are the best cafés and bakeries for maritozzi in the city

Written by
Time Out Tokyo Editors
Translated by
Dina Kartit
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A maritozzo is a soft brioche bun filled with whipped cream and – if you can believe it – a classic Roman breakfast. In Italy, the enthusiasm for these delicious baked goods is such that fans have even organised citywide ‘Maritozzo Day’ festivals.

Maritozzi have really taken off in Japan recently, with a myriad of shops and cafés serving the traditional cream buns, or even putting their own spin on the formula. If you’re looking for satisfying maritozzo, we’ve got eight stores and cafés in Tokyo offering this mouth-watering treat, in all different shapes, sizes and flavours.

Note: these cafés and shops might close early depending on the current Covid-19 measures. Please check with the individual outlets for the latest business hours. 

RECOMMENDED: The best patisseries and dessert cafés in Tokyo

Bun fight

  • Restaurants
  • Bakeries
  • Harajuku

This Harajuku outlet of the popular Milk Bakery chain specialises in pastries and buns loaded with fresh cream. The store has developed a bread dough exclusively for maritozzo, with a chewy texture that matches the airy Hokkaido whipped cream perfectly. The cream is blended with a bit of custard to give it a richer, sweeter flavour. 

The store has two flavours of maritozzi available: sweet plain cream (¥390) and sweet and sour strawberry cream (¥430).

  • Shopping
  • Yoyogi-Uehara

Located just one-minute on foot from Yoyogi-Uehara Station, Boulangerie and Cafe Main Mano in Oku-Shibuya will make you feel like you’ve been transported to Paris. 

The maritozzi here are made with a moist brioche dough, stuffed with a mixture of fresh cream cheese, homemade vanilla custard cream and special whipped cream. The chef also adds wasanbon (fine-grained Japanese sugar) to give the buns a richer flavour. To top it all off, Main Mano’s maritozzo are filled with seasonal fruit. They’re available in two flavours: matcha and Japanese black tea, priced at ¥760 each. 

There are only four buns available per day, but these gems are absolutely worth it for their delicate texture and the freshness of the fruit. We recommend calling ahead, or getting there early to make sure you can get your hands on one.

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  • Shopping
  • Grocery stores
  • Shirokane

Drogheria Sancricca is an Italian grocery store near Shirokane Takanawa Station. Inside, the shop also has a café where you can enjoy authentic Italian food made with natural ingredients.

Drogheria Sancricca’s maritozzo dolce (¥600) is baked freshly every day from 8am to 1pm. The buns are long and filled with a mixture of fresh hazelnut chocolate cream, custard and white chocolate. They're perfect when washed down with a hot cup of espresso coffee. 

The store sells these little pockets of heaven in limited numbers so be sure to make a reservation via phone or online. You can also order them for takeout and delivery.

  • Restaurants
  • Bakeries
  • Harajuku

Just a ten-minute walk from Harajuku Station, Nansuca Pansuca immediately catches your attention with its bright, colourful façade by artist Hideten Oshiro. The baked goods here often sell out before the day is over, so you’ll want to get in quick. The store uses seven specially selected types of flour, including organic spelt flour from Germany.

Don’t miss the maritozzi here, which will satisfy your eyes and your taste buds. They’re made with a small brioche bun filled with such a generous amount of cream – about 7 cm to 8 cm – that the bread almost disappears. Three flavours are available, including pistachio (¥480), gianduja and blood orange – that’s chocolate hazelnut cream and a blood orange sauce (¥480) – and limone, a lemon cream version with edible flower petals (¥430).

You can make a reservation online. Please note that delivery is only available between 2pm and 6pm.

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  • Shopping
  • Bakeries
  • Nihonbashi

Founded in 1833, Peck is a luxury grocery store from Milan which opened in Nihonbashi Takashimaya in 1986. Since then, new stores have opened in Shinjuku and Tamagawa, all selling European delicacies, including exquisite olive oil, ham, cheese and more. 

Recently, Peck started selling maritozzo buns in two flavours. The standard maritozzo (¥281) consists of fresh cream encasing an orange peel, sandwiched in a brioche bun and topped with powdered sugar. The pistachio flavour (¥321) has a light-tasting pistachio cream topped with crushed pistachios. Both maritozzo come with a small chocolate chip on top showing the Peck logo. 

  • Restaurants
  • Italian
  • Harajuku

Eataly, an Italian deli and market which originated in Turin, has several outlets around Tokyo, but this one in front of Harajuku Station also has a restaurant and café with a 70-seat terrace. So you can taste Italian delicacies while enjoying the view over Yoyogi Park. Aside from classic Italian cuisine such as fresh pasta and pizza, you can also get traditional Italian sweets, including maritozzo. 

Eataly’s maritozzi are made using extra fine Mulino Marino wheat flour imported from Italy and principally used for preparing pizza dough. Slight notes of orange are added to the homemade dough and give it a tartness that goes nicely with the fresh whipped cream. Eataly’s most popular maritozzo flavours are the plain con panna (¥420), and fragora – a fresh milk cream topped with sliced strawberries (¥480). 

If you’re looking for more maritozzi, head to the Eataly café in Marunouchi, which serves limited-edition maritozzo flavours such as tiramisu and chocolate.

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  • Restaurants
  • Daikanyama

If you love the fresh baked goods served at Starbucks Reserve Roastery Tokyo, you'll want to head on over to Bakery Princi's first independent shop located within Daikanyama T-Site. 

In addition to bread and pastries, Princi offers a daily selection of over 80 original recipes including salads, lasagne and even cocktails, making it possible to enjoy authentic Italian throughout the entire day. In fact, there are so many options that you might have a hard time picking between the range of sandwiches, pizza, brioche, and other baked goods on offer. 

Those with a sweet tooth should go for the Daikanyama-limited ‘Bignolata al cioccolato’ (¥518), a traditional Italian dessert that consists of a cream puff filled with cream and covered with plenty of chocolate.

  • Shopping
  • Bakeries
  • Denenchofu

Sakimoto is a boutique bakery chain originally from Osaka, and this Denenchofu shop is its very first sit-down café in Tokyo. 

The store’s popularity comes from the fact that it makes its signature Gokubi shokupan bread without using eggs or milk, meaning it’s ideal for people with food allergies. Those who aren’t ready to give up on lactose just yet can go for the Gokunama bread – it’s made the same way, but uses milk, butter and cream. Whichever you choose, the bread is crispy but remains soft and fluffy inside.

Aside from bread, Sakimoto also sells maritozzi made with chewy dough baked for over 22 hours, and loaded with whipped cream – sorry, these decadent buns aren’t lactose-free. There are three flavours available: plain cream (¥420); strawberry, with strawberry slices topped with a mixture of whipped cream and strawberry jam (¥450); and pistachio, with a whipped cream mixed with plenty of roasted pistachios (¥470).

You can eat in order takeout and delivery via the official website.

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