Wagyumafia
Photo: Wagyumafia

Iconic Tokyo dishes that are available for takeaway

Some of the best and most popular things to eat in Tokyo are now available for takeout: wagyu sandwiches, takoyaki, sliders and more

Emma Steen
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Emma Steen
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We love our piping hot nikuman buns and FamilyMart fried chicken as much as the next person, but when it comes to snacking in the city, there are a few eats that are a step above the rest. These are the items you hype to all your friends when asked about the food in Tokyo, and snacks that you crave again and again. At a time like this, it's not feasible to dine in at your local restaurants, but luckily, these shops have made their most popular items available for takeaway. Are they really worth the hype? Yes, every bit of it.

RECOMMENDED: Don't feel like cooking? These restaurants are available for delivery and takeout

  • Restaurants
  • Shibuya

Tempu owner Masahide Sakuramoto moved from Osaka to open this legendary little takoyaki shop in 2014, and the standing-only eatery has since become a focal point of the Shibuya neighboourhood.

This ubiquitous street snack consists of a tender piece of octopus encased in a gooey, piping hot batter made with spring onions and pickled ginger, and topped with a generous drizzle of sauce. The golden-brown, fresh-off-the-griddle takoyaki at this brightly lit eatery are made to order, available in variations such as dashi, ponzu, olive oil or chilli oil sauce.

  • Restaurants
  • Contemporary American
  • Harajuku

Normally, the signature pulled pork slider at Julia is only served as part of the restaurant's ¥19,000 wine pairing menu, but just for a short while, the restaurant has made a larger version of their slider available to order for takeaway as a separate item.

When contemplating a list of the best dishes in the city, you wouldn't expect to have an American BBQ staple to be at the top of it, but this pulled pork sandwich is solid gold. Restaurant head, chef Nao, bakes the fresh buns daily to be stuffed with gloriously smoky pulled pork and fresh apple, and then smeared with housemade sauce. It's the kind of sandwich that cues a celestial chorus to burst into song as you're eating it, and the experience is well worth your ¥1,000.

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  • Restaurants
  • Nakameguro

Wagyumafia's beefy sandwiches are notorious for their heart-stopping price tags, but if you've always been curious about its signature Chateaubriand Cutlet Sandwich, perhaps you can excuse the splurge just this once. The prized Kobe Chateaubriand costs a whopping ¥23,000 (no, this is not a typo), though you can also opt for the zabuton (chuck) cut at ¥5,000 for a more affordable yet equally satisfying experience to document on Instagram.

Wagyumafia's Nakameguro shop is currently closed, but you can pick up your order at Wagyumafia The Butcher's Kitchen, where the same cutlet sandwiches are on offer for a limited time.

  • Shopping
  • Nakameguro

Who would have thought that fruit and whipped cream paired so gloriously with sandwich bread? The strange combo might have raised some eyebrows to those when first introduced to the fruit sando, but these scrumptious triangles are sold in any self-respecting Japanese sandwich store.

Daiwa in Nakameguro is a speciality shop that only sells sandwiches filled with seasonal fruit. There are lots of variations, but with the weather warming, folks are eagerly willing to queue, and pay a premium, for the ever-popular high-grade Miyazaki mango sandwich.

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Tamahide's oyakodon
  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Ningyocho

Tamahide is famous for being the birthplace of oyakodon, a rice dish topped with grilled chicken and soft egg omelette. The restaurant has been running in Tokyo since 1760, and while chicken and egg over rice seems like a dish that's fairly easy to recreate at home, there's a reason why Tamahide has been in business for so long.

Juicy pieces of chicken are blanketed in eggs that are lightly scrambled before being drizzled with a light savoury sauce and tipped onto a bed of fluffy rice. Diners are typically prepared to stand in a two-hour queue to be seated here, but for now, opting for takeout (¥1,500) might be the more sensible option. Lunch is available from 11.30pm-2pm.

More food adventures at home

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