0 Love It

The five best Long Island City restaurants

Our list of the best Long Island City restaurants includes trusty favorites and new hot spots in this Queens nabe

Photograph: Paul Wagtouicz
Mu Ramen totally chicken ramen with egg and corn

The Long Island City restaurant scene has been steadily improving for years, but Quebecois chef Hugue Dufour took local dining to new heights in 2010 with M. Wells, a classic diner that moonlighted as a world-class restaurant. Sadly, it shuttered in summer 2011, but more than a year later, Dufour resurrected his eclectic menu at M. Wells Dinette and made his full-fledged return with a new steakhouse in the neighborhood. From Mexican restaurants to top-notch ramen in NYC, these are the best Long Island City restaurants

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Long Island City, Queens

Best Long Island City restaurants

Casa Enrique

Taco trucks line Roosevelt Avenue in Jackson Heights as the 7 train rumbles overhead, so it’s fitting to find New York City’s sole Michelin-starred Mexican spot at the International Express’ first stop outside Manhattan. Cosme Aguilar’s menu includes such favorites as the earthy pork and hominy soup pozole and enchiladas de pollo en salsa verde. Chamorro de borrego al huaxamole—tender lamb shank braised in ruddy sauce of chili pulla, huajes and epazote—eats like South of the Border ossobuco. And the tacos, including one stuffed with slow-cooked cow tongue, are cradled in house-made tortillas.

Read more
Long Island City

Crescent Grill

“Farm-to-table” and “New American” are buzzwords often tacked on to make a place sound hip, but not at Crescent Grill. There, ingredients—including grass-fed Hudson Valley beef, Long Island duck, heritage pork and rainbow cauliflower—come from 45 different Northeast farms. Chef Kenneth Corrow’s cooking draws upon a global pantry and turns that colorful cauliflower into a soup with crispy guanciale and vadouvan, a Frenchified masala blended with shallots and garlic. Rosy smoked duck breast goes the Southeast Asian route with orange nước chấm, a New American take on the Vietnamese umami powerhouse fish sauce. House-made pastas include pork cheek pappardelle, while desserts are updated classics like pears poached in mulled wine with brown butter foam and ginger almond crumble.

Read more
Long Island City

John Brown Smokehouse

This joint offers some of the finest Kansas City–style barbecue—pulled pork, spare ribs, and burnt ends—in the city. The burnt ends, twice-rubbed and twice-smoked chunks of brisket are so good some folks call them meat candy. And in true multicultural Queens fashion, owner Josh Bowen offers some zippy kimchi to go with the meat. How’s that for Korean barbecue, y’all?

Read more
Long Island City

Mu Ramen

When Per Se alum Joshua Smookler caught the ramen bug, he never looked back. Mu started as a popup in a bagel shop, but these days, Smookler operates out of a sleek 22-seat restaurant offering such bowls as the signature Mu Ramen—which tips its hat to the New York deli with brisket and half sour pickle in an oxtail and bone marrow broth—and offbeat apps like tebasaki gyoza, deep fried chicken wings stuffed with brioche and foie gras.

Read more
Long Island City

M. Wells Steakhouse

Tender braised tripe, French onion soup crowned with a beef marrow bone and spaghetti bottarga are not the stuff of steakhouses. Then again, Hugue Dufour’s Michelin-starred avant-garde chophouse is not your father’s old-fashioned steakhouse. At M. Wells, sit at the bar beside the open kitchen and watch the flames dance as your porterhouse is cooked over oak and maple wood. Oh, and if meat masterpieces aren’t enough, Sunday brunch includes oatmeal with foie gras and Russian waffle, an over-the-top combination of smoked fish and several types of caviar that vary from week to week.

Read more
Long Island City

Comments

0 comments