10 best Thai LGBTQ movies on Netflix
G Village

Celebrate Pride with these 10 best Thai LGBTQ movies on Netflix

Embrace diversity and inclusion, and indulge in this selection of LGBTQ-inspired movies ๐Ÿณ๏ธโ€๐ŸŒˆ

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Written by
Arpiwach Supateerawanitt
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In the spirit of Pride, let’s celebrate love and equality for all with a selection of 10 must-watch Thai LGBTQ movies on Netflix. Prepare your snacks and get ready to laugh, cry and take in all the feels.

Dew (2019)
CJ Major Entertainment

Dew (2019)

Pop returns home and gets a teaching job at his old school. That’s when he meets a young girl who has him reminiscing about a bittersweet past with his old pal Dew in a time when homosexuality was still unmentionable.

Director Chookiat Sakveerakul (The Love of Siam) takes inspiration from Korean romantic flick Bungee Jumping of Their Own (2001) about a doomed relationship, but switches things up with a gay narrative to fit his signature. The result is the same devastating love story that will make you cry your eyes out.

Driver (2017)
Phranakornfilm

Driver (2017)

When her husband disappears without warning, a wife hires his favorite driver to help look for him, but the search for her spouse reveals a shocking truth.

Mysteries about missing individuals are always a great watch, but it’s much more fun when the story is spiced with raunchy love affairs and a small stab-in-the-back scheme.

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Fathers (2016)
Lovetitude Production

Fathers (2016)

Hoping to build a family, a gay couple decides to adopt a young boy but find themselves challenged by societal discrimination and personal issues.

Fathers offers a different perspective of the LGBTQ community in Thailand by taking a more serious and true-to-life stance (rather than make jokes or add ghosts to the story). This one is a tear-jerker, so be prepared.

How to Win at Checkers (Every Time) (2015)
Add Word Productions

How to Win at Checkers (Every Time) (2015)

Siblings Aek and Oat share a strong bond of brotherhood, but change threatens when Aek’s name is cast in Thailand’s annual military draft lottery. The younger Oat takes matters into his own hands and does everything to prevent his brother from being drafted.

How to Win at Checkers (Every Time), directed by Korean-American filmmaker Josh Kim, expounds on the coming-of-age story of two brothers with different sexualities, while asserting a critique on issues regarding the class and military system in Thailand.

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The Iron Ladies (2000)
Tai Entertainment

The Iron Ladies (2000)

A volleyball team, consisting of transsexuals and feminine gay men, rises to Thai sports stardom after winning regional matches. Now, they are on a mission to compete—and win—a national tournament.

The Iron Ladies was one of the very first Thai feature films to touch upon unheard LBGTQ narratives. It received phenomenal success and accolades when it was released. The whole story is also based on an actual national volleyball team, which gives the movie biographical touches that are worth getting into.

The Last Heroes (2018)
Guru Film

The Last Heroes (2018)

As their village is threatened by a powerful enemy, a group of feminine men step up and learn the art of war to protect their homeland.

This film can also be considered as an alternative telling of patriotism in ancient Thailand, where gay campy soldiers, instead of beefy, straight alpha males, save the day. A bit of inclusive history, we guess.

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The Love of Siam (2007)
Sahamongkolfilm

The Love of Siam (2007)

Boyhood friends Mew and Tong reunite after years apart and, this time, they finally explore what they truly feel for one another. Complications in Tong’s family, however, threaten to come between them.

The Love of Siam successfully encapsulates the culture clash between generations, especially when it comes to views on love and family. Since its release, the film has been acclaimed for paving the way for coming-of-age LGBTQ movies in Thailand.

Kung Fu Tootsies (2007)
GTH

Kung Fu Tootsies (2007)

A mafia family faces its biggest challenge when its pride is shattered to pieces by a rival gang. But the path to reclaiming dignity is filled with laughter when the kingpin turns to his long-lost son, whose true aspiration is to be a drag queen.

If you’re in the mood for adrenaline-driven pacing tinged with a lot of ridiculous jokes, then Kung Fu Tootsies won’t let you down. The main character is a bit of queer caricature, but it’s all in good fun.

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Malila: The Farewell Flower (2017)
G Village

Malila: The Farewell Flower (2017)

Old flames Shane and Pich are reunited and reignite their love. But their journey is laden with difficulty and trauma as one is haunted by the death of his lover while the other is suffering from fatal cancer.

A hit at the Busan Film Festival, this film by famed Thai director Anucha Boonyawatana is a slow-burn trip that guides you through the meaning of love and life, but with a touch of religious and social commentary. If it all sound too serious for you, remember that hot hunk Sukollawat “Weir” Kanarot is there to fulfil your queer fantasy.

Oh My Ghost! (the franchise)
Pra Nakhon Film

Oh My Ghost! (the franchise)

This hilarious film follows Jay Taew and her drag queen crew as they battle the vengeful and lovelorn spirits that co-reside in their apartment.

The OMG franchise has built up a massive universe of campiness, with five installments that follow the same plot. Watch it (and the four other sequels) when you just want to zone out and have a big laugh with silly slapstick fun.

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