Your ultimate guide to Bangkok

Discover the best events, attractions, restaurants, bars, clubs and more in the city

Counting down to Awakening Bangkok
Things to do

Counting down to Awakening Bangkok

Charoenkrung-wide light exhibition is set to return Nov 15-24

First look at the world debut of Hajime Sorayama's giant aluminum T-Rex cyborg in Bangkok
Art

First look at the world debut of Hajime Sorayama's giant aluminum T-Rex cyborg in Bangkok

Cultural and historical landmarks in the Old Town that you may have forgotten
Things to do

Cultural and historical landmarks in the Old Town that you may have forgotten

The Old Town is one of Bangkok’s most significant tourist draws, home to the some of the country’s most striking landmarks such as The Grand Palace, Wat Po and a spate of museums and galleries. The area, however, also boasts a number of other cultural gems apart from these guidebook staples; attractions that remain untainted by tour coaches and selfie sticks. These “undiscovered” sights encapsulate a part of the country’s cultural history that’s no less great than the stories told by the area’s more popular attractions. Take our advice and dedicate your next weekend to discovering these hidden Old Town gems.

Time Out meets Jeff Ramsey
Restaurants

Time Out meets Jeff Ramsey

The celebrity chef gives us a sneak preview of his highly anticipated modern Japanese venture in Bangkok, Kintsugi

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What's inside the latest issue of Time Out Bangkok magazine
Things to do

What's inside the latest issue of Time Out Bangkok magazine

In this issue, you'll find: 🕌 Cultural and historical landmarks in the Old Town👩‍🎤 Interview with Valentina Ploy📽 Joker Movie review🍽 New restaurants in town, and more

Latest restaurants and cafés review

Kin by Eats Payao
Restaurants

Kin by Eats Payao

This new Eats Payao, now called Kin, has a more grown-up feel

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
OOOBkk
Restaurants

OOOBkk

OOOBkk is actually a playful acronym for One Ounce for Onion.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
[REVISIT] Thiptara
Restaurants

[REVISIT] Thiptara

Now that Thai fine-dining is on the rise in Bangkok, Thiptara is finding ways to transform itself, albeit slowly

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
1919 at Vesper
Restaurants

1919 at Vesper

The new 1919 by Vesper goes back to its roots, serving Italian aperitivo drinks and a selection of hearty Italian fare

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
[REVISIT] Gaa
Restaurants

[REVISIT] Gaa

Gaa stands out from the rest, thanks to Chef Garima Arora’s willingness to break the boundaries that define Thai, Indian and Western fare

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
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Latest bars review

Copper Bar
Bars

Copper Bar

Seating yourself on one of these gilded barstools allows a front-row view to owner Fabio Brugnolaro’s impressive mixology ministrations

Alonetogether
Bars

Alonetogether

The peeps behind Sugar Ray, the city’s coolest hidden gem, have collaborated with the owner of old town speakeasy Ku Bar to open a jazz bar

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Mutual Bar
Bars

Mutual Bar

A collaborative project among seven friends, Mutual Bar is a casual and cozy space where you can wind down while surrounded by comfy seating, good cocktails and lively music

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
The Suriyasai Content Bar
Bars

The Suriyasai Content Bar

The Suriyasai Content Bar takes you back to the glamour of the 1920s

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
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New movie releases

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil
Movies

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil

An overstuffed follow-up to 2014’s Maleficent (a skillful Sleeping Beauty spin-off), Joachim Rønning’s sequel finds one worthy reason to exist in Michelle Pfeiffer’s wicked Queen Ingrith. As the nemesis to Angelina Jolie’s red-lipped siren, Pfeiffer gives us exactly what we want—the same hissing Catwoman attitude she heated up for Mother! Intimidating in Ellen Mirojnick’s pearl-encrusted costumes, Pfeiffer strides into character: Her Ingrith plots to overtake the realm, poisoning the familial bond between its young queen, Aurora (a graceful Elle Fanning), and her misunderstood godmother, Maleficent (Jolie, glamorous and imposing). Will Ingrith’s villainy destroy the duo’s love, which the first film so thoughtfully built? Even if you have an idea how that question gets answered, Pfeiffer’s deceitful empress (with flower allergies) keeps things entertaining. The rest of the package isn’t as inspired, despite Patrick Tatopoulos’s fanciful production design, which recalls a lesser Avatar, and all the cute, flickering things hovering around. A smitten Prince Phillip (Harris Dickinson), engaged to Aurora, sometimes downgrades the otherwise central Maleficent from feared potentate to anxious empty-nester. There’s also an underground clan of creatures that includes Chiwetel Ejiofor’s horned Conall, living in hiding from human threat. It all leads to a noisy finale that wears out its welcome. (You’ll crave for more of the quieter battle from an earlier dinner scene, when Pfeiffer an

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Joker
Movies

Joker

It's the laugh that gets you: Joaquin Phoenix’s half cackle, half rasp has all the soothing music of a vulture in a blender. It’ll be ratting around in your head long after the old-school “The End” card flashes up on this unrelenting, grimly funny and brilliantly visceral reinvention of the DC supervillain. Joker is a truly nightmarish vision of late-era capitalism—arguably the best “social horror” film since Get Out—and Phoenix is magnetic in it. He runs Heath Ledger cigarette paper-close as the finest screen Joker. Like everything in this drum-tight movie, the title’s lack of a definite article is no accident: It’s not the fully formed Joker being introduced here, but Arthur Fleck, a man whose ambition to tell jokes professionally is at odds with the living he scraps as a clown for hire on Gotham’s grimy streets. Judging by posters of the movies playing—Excalibur and Blow Out—it’s 1981, but it feels more like the ’70s of Death Wish. He lives with his frail mom (Frances Conroy) in a broken-down tenement, eking out a little joy watching a TV chat show hosted with oily relish by Murray Franklin (Robert De Niro). Arthur’s on seven types of medication and has a neurological condition that causes him to laugh—okay, cackle—uncontrollably. In these domestic early scenes, Phoenix establishes Arthur as a man who sees himself less as an underdog than a mutt waiting to be put down. “I just don’t want to feel so bad anymore,” he says. And no wonder: It’s a seriously bleak world he inh

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Movies

El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie

This Jessie Pinkman-centric spin-off is a fun if inert slice of fan service.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
The Dead Don't Die
Movies

The Dead Don't Die

A languid, undercooked affair, writer-director Jim Jarmusch’s playful stab at the zombie movie returns the genre to the backwoods America of George Romero’s seminal Night of the Living Dead and gives it a half-meta reworking. It sprinkles in an ensemble cast to die for, bursts of OTT flesh-chomping gore, nods to zombie classics (look out for Living Dead’s 1967 Pontiac LeMans) and a few big laughs, but its zeitgeist-y concerns and self-conscious final-act twists don’t quite land. It’s a love letter to zombie movies typed in Comic Sans, and it reminds you that Jarmusch’s best work has an invisible rigor, even at its loosest. Sadly, that’s missing here. In the spirit of Romero, the undead apocalypse arrives in the Midwestern town of Centerville via interrupted radio signals, daylight that lasts too long and, most alarmingly for this rural spot, a missing chicken. Is the cranky hermit outside of town to blame? (He’s played by Jarmusch lucky charm Tom Waits, 50 percent gravel-voiced omniscience, 50 percent beard.) Disturbing news bulletins about fracking knocking the Earth off its axis point to a bigger story. But at the urging of an obnoxious MAGA type (Steve Buscemi), cops Cliff Robertson (Bill Murray) and Ronnie Peterson (Adam Driver) investigate, with the latter oddly certain that it all points to an invasion of the undead. Sure enough, said invasion arrives, presaged by a zombie Iggy Pop and a particularly chewy scene at the town’s diner. The shuf

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars

The latest Time Out interviews

Valentina Ploy
Music

Valentina Ploy

Who’s Valentina Ploy?

Patchara “Pom” Pirapak
Restaurants

Patchara “Pom” Pirapak

“The food I serve now reflects 100 percent who I am,” says Chef Patchara “Pom” Pirapak

The cast of The Naked Director
Movies

The cast of The Naked Director

Japan is known the world over for promoting the unique and unconventional, even in it adult movie offerings. Japanese porn has satiated the passions and desires of people all over the world. It is kinky, submissive and role play-centric, and quite antagonistic to country’s generally conservative attitude. The country’s porn industry owes its leading position in the global stage to Toru Muranishi, whose wild imagination and progressive vision, gave rise to a different brand of Japanese AV (adult video) films in the ’80s. The Naked Director, an Netflix original series starring acclaimed actors Takayuki Yamada in the lead role, Shinnosuke Mitsushima and Tetsuji Tamayama, showcases the journey of Muranishi in revolutionizing the Japanese, and eventually the global, porn industry. We sat down with the stars of the film, and found out more than we expected—about the movie and about Japanese porn. The Naked Director/Netflix What are your thoughts on Toru Muranishi? Yamada: He is self-centered and forced many people to work for him. On the other hand, he has many unique and imaginative ideas and likes to do what others haven’t done before. He transformed pornography from an underground industry into to a form of entertainment that’s acceptable by society.   How did Toru Muranishi feel when he learned that Netflix was making a series based on his life? Did you meet him in real life? Yamada: Yes, we did meet Muranishi. He was quite optimistic about having a series made ba

Genius Gangster
Art

Genius Gangster

The arts and music scene in Bangkok is always changing and evolving, and into this highly prolific arena comes ShapeShifter, a music performance that puts focus on visuals as much as sound. The idea might sound a bit cliché but, trust us, ShapeShifter is everything but. The concept was created by a group of creatives called Genius Gangster, comprised of Voranat “Urk” Voraphitak, a graphic designer and owner of musical instrument store Sathon Chainsaw; Chanida “Kook" Voraphitak, founder of graphic design brand Cuscus the Cuckoos; and Gunn Leelhasuwan, one of the masterminds behind popular bars Asia Today and Teens of Thailand. ShapeShifter is basically a platform where people who specialize in different art forms can gather, collaborate and work with each other’s distinctive skills and talents.   Genius Gangster Sereechai Puttes/Time Out Bangkok   Each of the founders’ unique taste in art and music served as inspiration. “I like clubs with loud music and everything, but most of the clubs that I’ve been to seem to only put effort into the sound but not the visuals,” Urk explains. “When I started working in this industry, I realized that I can make every element equally good. So every time we do our events, we really put our mind and dedication to all the elements. Like when we do the visuals, we do it like it’s a film, and not just pictures that respond to the music.” Most of the time, when you attend different events hosted by the same curator, you can already prede

Best hotels in Bangkok

Waldorf Astoria Bangkok

Waldorf Astoria Bangkok

The stunning, brand-new Waldorf Astoria Bangkok shoots up from the bustling Rachaprasong intersection like a flower; in fact, it was designed to look like one—a magnolia, to be exact. Inside, design elements by Hong Kong-based architect Andre Fu—such as wrought iron sculptural panels and an assortment of intricate chandeliers—pay homage to local Thai culture as well as the Waldorf legacy. The property boasts 171 rooms and suites, each with interactive entertainment systems, well-stocked mini bars and sprawling bathrooms with rainfall showers, high-tech toilets and toiletries by Salvatore Ferragamo. Guests have access to three restaurants, two bars and a tea room lounge; our favorites are the Front Room, a lobby-level eatery serving innovative Nordic-Thai fare, and the top floor Champagne Bar, offering flutes of bubbly to be enjoyed on plush green velvet couches overlooking the city below. A small (three rooms) but lovely spa sits next to the open air, rooftop pool, scattered with giant wicker chairs and affording one of the best views from the property. There's also a 24-hour fitness center, as well as the aforementioned lounge, Peacock Alley, perfect for whiling away the hours between city exploration and dinner—look for the clock behind the bar, a quiet nod to the storied hotel brand's first property in Manhattan (every Waldorf Astoria has a version of the first location's beautiful wall clock).  Time Out tip: Book ahead at the spa and the Front Room, both popular must-d

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Check prices
W Bangkok
Hotels

W Bangkok

W Bangkok integrates twisted Thai culture with quirky Western motifs

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
The Okura Prestige Bangkok
Hotels

The Okura Prestige Bangkok

The Okura Prestige Bangkok has set a new standard for luxury hotels

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
SO Sofitel Bangkok
Hotels

SO Sofitel Bangkok

Gorgeous views and unique designs are the key reasons you’ll love SO Sofitel Bangkok. Located a few blocks away from Lumpini Park, the enclaves lush greenery can be spotted from most rooms. Room styles are crafted around four different themes: earth, water, wood and metal. The Earth rooms are embellished with playful, curvy walls inspired by prehistoric cave paintings found in Pha Taem National Park in Ubon Ratchathani. Metal rooms are decked out like an urban refuge with minimal, modern decor and pristine white furniture. The Wood room, on the other hand, is inspired by a traditional Northern Thai wooden house, while the Water room—the sexiest room of all—features concrete walls and semi-transparent glasses partitions.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars

Out of town

Siem Reap through new eyes
Travel

Siem Reap through new eyes

Here are are new places you have to visit when you’re in Siem Reap

Unconventional museums around the world
Travel

Unconventional museums around the world

Check-in: Renaissance Koh Samui
Travel

Check-in: Renaissance Koh Samui

If you’re looking to experience an extraordinary holiday, Renaissance Koh Samui might just be the place for you. Though you have the option to indulge in your usual tropical holiday activities, like sunbathing or chilling by the pool, Renaissance’s new global marketing campaign, titled “Discover This Way,” may just convince you to venture outside of your comfort zone—and even outside of the hotel—for an entirely unique travel experience. The Discover This Way program features activities within and beyond the hotel led by a Samui-born and raised navigator who knows every best bit of the island. Renaissance Koh Samui, located on the picturesque Lamai beach, has been a staple for many travelers for decades—not so surprising since the accommodations, facilities and impeccable service have never failed to impress. Deluxe rooms offer views of the 50-meter Leelawadee lap pool (said to be the longest pool on the island) and the resort’s lush grounds, while pool villas offer the ultimate privacy and spacious rooms consisting of 4-poster king-size bed. Your Renaissance journey starts soon as you check in, with Punchbowl Rituals, a cocktail-making session by the beach. A mixologist will guide you through the process of making a unique drink using only Thai ingredients —we’re talking lemongrass, galangal, Thai chili, hot basil, kaffir lime, and fresh cane syrup, all of which are mixed with renowned Phuket spirit, Chalong Bay Rum. After the session, you’ll be seated at the Navigator’s

Check-in: The Habita
Hotels

Check-in: The Habita

Phuket's Crown Jewel Sri Panwa has finally introduced the new addition to the luxurious villa complex

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars