Your ultimate guide to Bangkok

Discover the best events, attractions, restaurants, bars, clubs and more in the city

Check out what's in the latest issue of Time Out Bangkok
Things to do

Check out what's in the latest issue of Time Out Bangkok

From illegal substance to magical elixir: How cannabis is shaping the future of Thailand
Health and beauty

From illegal substance to magical elixir: How cannabis is shaping the future of Thailand

Thailand is set to benefit tremendously from the new legislation, and it seems to be just a starting point

Siam Square’s newly-revamped Lido Connect set to open later this month
News

Siam Square’s newly-revamped Lido Connect set to open later this month

The soft opening will be on 13 July

The best 9 chocolate creations Bangkok has to offer
Restaurants

The best 9 chocolate creations Bangkok has to offer

There’s no better time to celebrate the city’s thriving crafted-chocolate scene

3 new cafes in Charoenkrung you want to check out this weekend (6-7 Jul)
News

3 new cafes in Charoenkrung you want to check out this weekend (6-7 Jul)

We roam the alleys of Charoenkrung to discover 3 new openings in the riverside neighborhood

Latest restaurants and cafés review

Paii
Restaurants

Paii

The restaurant at The House on Sathorn is embracing fancy seafood creations with bold Thai flavors with a new restaurant

Kua
Restaurants

Kua

A group of friends have elevated the humble street food, taking it into a proper restaurant setting and tweaking it

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
San
Restaurants

San

The restaurant skillfully blends the flavors of Thai, Chinese and American cuisine (as its name, which means “three” in Chinese, suggests) in impressive creations

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Kaizen Coffee
Restaurants

Kaizen Coffee

The relocated coffee shop now serves full-on meals in a two-story glasshouse-style building decorated with warm tones and raw materials

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Chef's Table
Restaurants

Chef's Table

The latest addition to Lebua hotel impressively excels in all the criteria required of a haute cuisine restaurant

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
find more bangkok restaurants

Latest bars review

The Suriyasai Content Bar
Bars

The Suriyasai Content Bar

The Suriyasai Content Bar takes you back to the glamour of the 1920s

Baby Bar
Bars

Baby Bar

The Mastermind who used to be behind now-defunct All Six To Twelve Cafe & Social Bar and Amontre Playroom & Brasserie has opened a new bar at the resort-inspired boutique hotel Craftsman

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Lennon’s
Bars

Lennon’s

 This partrecord store, part-bar is home to more than 6,000 vinyl records and tape cassettes (said to be the country’s biggest collection)

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Flamenco
Bars

Flamenco

The new hangout spot combines over-the-top Baroque splendor with bold brash Latino party vibes

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
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New movie releases

Spider-Man: Far from Home
Movies

Spider-Man: Far from Home

Review by Joshua Rothkopf “I didn’t think I would have to save the world this summer,” says a near-terrified Peter Parker (Tom Holland, still charmingly dorky in an Anton Yelchin vein) near the front end of Spider-Man: Far from Home. Many viewers will feel heard: Little more than two months have passed since Avengers: Endgame crushed it with three hours of intergalactic pain, not to mention last December’s superb animated Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. Can’t Marvel give it a rest for a season? Well, no. Almost aware of how thirsty it is, the new movie—meta, irreverent and nowhere near a bad time—works best when it plays like a vacation from MCU seriousness. An unexpected blast of Whitney Houston’s “I Will Always Love You” and a cheesy montage of fallen superheroes (it turns out to be a high-school AV club’s video tribute) brings us up to speed in a new post–Tony Stark world of people reckoning with the “Blip,” when half the world’s population disappeared and suddenly came back. Peter, meanwhile, a self-described “16-year-old kid from Queens,” hopes to reveal his true feelings to MJ (Zendaya, feisty while being quietly vulnerable, showing off big range between this and HBO’s Euphoria) while on a class trip in Europe. As Far from Home leans into this travelogue section, much of it shot on location (the exquisite gondolas and cozy back alleys of Venice require no CGI to be superheroic), you wish the film would remain a breezy teen comedy, one with a panicky best friend (J

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
The Lion King
Movies

The Lion King

Review by Joshua Rothkopf Something is off about this defiantly unmagical remake of The Lion King, a film that is both photorealistic—down to every artfully crafted lens flare and whisker on Simba’s chin—and the furthest thing from real. It’ll either mildly disturb you or make you feel like your skin is on backward. Granted, it’s still The Lion King: still a study piece of Hamlet-derived musical theater, only with 100 percent more Beyoncé, which is never a bad thing. (Look deep into the lemon eyes of her lioness, Nala, and you can swear you see her.) But Disney’s animated movies have traditionally been invitations to dream bigger than nature; even when you go to one of its theme parks, you submit to pretending. This new Lion King is an invader of the real world, its characters akin to stuffed trophies mounted on the wall. They’re lifelike, yes, but somehow not alive. Almost certainly, kids aren’t going to mind this, even as their imaginations get a little shortchanged. Set in one of Africa’s uncannier valleys, today’s Lion King remains a story about talking and singing animals; no amount of digital work is going to change that. And vocal talent is what semi-saves this remake from Jungle Book director Jon Favreau’s more computerized instincts. As the regal Mufasa, sensible leader of the Pride Lands, the rumbling James Earl Jones still has his Darth Vader sonority on tap. He remembers to give an actual performance, as does Donald Glover, voicing the cub who would be king with

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Ma
Movies

Ma

Trashy movies aren’t good for you, but sometimes they burn with an unexpected honesty that feels more earned than the stuff we’re supposed to prefer. Such is the case with Ma, a scuzzy and brutal revenge thriller set in some hard-luck, blue-collar town (never named) filled with uneasy stares and kids making dumb choices. It’s an unusually potent atmosphere for a quickie Blumhouse horror project; you can’t say this one is elevated by the presence of Octavia Spencer—it’s more that she allows herself to descend to the crazy-eyed pleasures of being monstrous. She plays Sue Ann, a never-not-suspicious local who buys the teens cases of booze and lets them party in her basement. There are ulterior reasons for her friendliness. You know exactly what they are from the start (the coy ’80s-set flashbacks to Sue Ann’s own high-school trauma are extraneous). Call it a welcome surprise that Tate Taylor, the director of Spencer’s brassy turn in The Help as well as the underrated James Brown biopic Get on Up, seems to be harboring an inner Wes Craven. When Ma breaks bad, it breaks bad hard, with some real wince-inducing moments of bodily harm. The film’s bland young hero, Maggie (Diana Silvers), doesn’t seem to have a chance in Sue Ann’s abattoir, but Taylor distracts us with juicier details on the periphery, like Maggie’s mother, a divorced cocktail waitress (Juliette Lewis, exuding abandonment). There’s an undertone of rage to Ma, a stink. It’s a film in which co-workers snipe at each oth

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Toy Story 4
Movies

Toy Story 4

Turns out, Pixar’s sentient toys can still make us cry: Nearly 25 years after their cinematic debut, the sweetly selfless plastic pals return in a fourth Toy Story, one charged by the animated series’ thematic essence of finding purpose in being useful to others. It’s a hopeful, immensely human chapter that echoes the franchise’s complex notions of loyalty, displacement and self-worth, doing so with humor and warmth. Working from a script by Andrew Stanton and Stephany Folsom (as well as six other story contributors, including ousted ex-Pixar chief John Lasseter), director Josh Cooley successfully balances all of these elements—a noteworthy achievement considering the large cowboy boots he had to fill after the epic yet nuanced Toy Story 3, one of Pixar’s more perfect achievements. The reliable company of old friends certainly helps: Now happily living with a new kid, Bonnie (voiced by Madeleine McGraw), Tom Hanks’s pull-string pardner Woody, Tim Allen’s devoted Buzz Lightyear, Joan Cusack’s feisty Jesse and the rest of the gang are back. New to the clan is Forky (Veep’s Tony Hale, adding nervy personality and genuine weirdness), an existentially confused spork with low self-esteem that the ever-imaginative Bonnie creates as a kindergarten craft project. Convinced of his status as trash (an unusually raw class dilemma for a Pixar movie), Forky get a crash course on his toyness from Woody, himself thrown by a life crisis resembling that of a retiree. Bonnie has moved on to o

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars

The latest Time Out interviews

Crossthy
Music

Crossthy

We have chat with Ken Phupoom and Timothy Supreeleela, the duo behind EDM project Crossthy

Naphat Siangsomboon
Movies

Naphat Siangsomboon

Get to know more about the young actor who—with his looks, lineage and sensitive smarts—seems bound for Asiawide success

James Teeradon and Cherprang Areekul
Movies

James Teeradon and Cherprang Areekul

The starlets talk about GDH’s new thriller-fantasy flick Homestay, and how it pushed them beyond their boundaries

Ryuichi Sakamoto
Music

Ryuichi Sakamoto

The musical polymath on his five-year documentary journey and the inspiration behind ‘async’, his first album in eight years.

Best hotels in Bangkok

Waldorf Astoria Bangkok

Waldorf Astoria Bangkok

The stunning, brand-new Waldorf Astoria Bangkok shoots up from the bustling Rachaprasong intersection like a flower; in fact, it was designed to look like one—a magnolia, to be exact. Inside, design elements by Hong Kong-based architect Andre Fu—such as wrought iron sculptural panels and an assortment of intricate chandeliers—pay homage to local Thai culture as well as the Waldorf legacy. The property boasts 171 rooms and suites, each with interactive entertainment systems, well-stocked mini bars and sprawling bathrooms with rainfall showers, high-tech toilets and toiletries by Salvatore Ferragamo. Guests have access to three restaurants, two bars and a tea room lounge; our favorites are the Front Room, a lobby-level eatery serving innovative Nordic-Thai fare, and the top floor Champagne Bar, offering flutes of bubbly to be enjoyed on plush green velvet couches overlooking the city below. A small (three rooms) but lovely spa sits next to the open air, rooftop pool, scattered with giant wicker chairs and affording one of the best views from the property. There's also a 24-hour fitness center, as well as the aforementioned lounge, Peacock Alley, perfect for whiling away the hours between city exploration and dinner—look for the clock behind the bar, a quiet nod to the storied hotel brand's first property in Manhattan (every Waldorf Astoria has a version of the first location's beautiful wall clock).  Time Out tip: Book ahead at the spa and the Front Room, both popular must-d

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Check prices
W Bangkok
Hotels

W Bangkok

W Bangkok integrates twisted Thai culture with quirky Western motifs

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
The Okura Prestige Bangkok
Hotels

The Okura Prestige Bangkok

The Okura Prestige Bangkok has set a new standard for luxury hotels

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
SO Sofitel Bangkok
Hotels

SO Sofitel Bangkok

Gorgeous views and unique designs are the key reasons you’ll love SO Sofitel Bangkok. Located a few blocks away from Lumpini Park, the enclaves lush greenery can be spotted from most rooms. Room styles are crafted around four different themes: earth, water, wood and metal. The Earth rooms are embellished with playful, curvy walls inspired by prehistoric cave paintings found in Pha Taem National Park in Ubon Ratchathani. Metal rooms are decked out like an urban refuge with minimal, modern decor and pristine white furniture. The Wood room, on the other hand, is inspired by a traditional Northern Thai wooden house, while the Water room—the sexiest room of all—features concrete walls and semi-transparent glasses partitions.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars

Out of town

Check in: The Habita
Hotels

Check in: The Habita

Phuket's Crown Jewel Sri Panwa has finally introduced the new addition to the luxurious villa complex

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Check in: Avani+ Samui
Hotels

Check in: Avani+ Samui

Set in the remote southwest coast of Koh Samui, Avani+ Samui lies on a quiet stretch along Phangka Beach best known for its pristine and uninterrupted seaside views

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Things to do in Can Tho
Travel

Things to do in Can Tho

Experience the fascinating places and attractions that Mekong Delta’s capital city has to offer

Check-in: JW Marriott Phu Quoc Emerald Bay
Travel

Check-in: JW Marriott Phu Quoc Emerald Bay

Get away to a Vietnam resort built around whimsy and fantasy