Your ultimate guide to Bangkok

Discover the best events, attractions, restaurants, bars, clubs and more in the city

The best Chinese restaurants in Bangkok
Restaurants

The best Chinese restaurants in Bangkok

From authentic Sichuan cuisine to modern oriental fine dining, we round up the best Chinese restaurants in Bangkok

The many facets of Piyarat Kaljareuk
LGBT

The many facets of Piyarat Kaljareuk

The Kantana heir on continuing the company's legacy, dealing with depression, supporting LGBT equality, and launching the localized version of RuPaul's Drag Race

Best Chinese-themed bars in Bangkok
Bars

Best Chinese-themed bars in Bangkok

Time Out welcomes February, a month that celebrates both love and the Chinese lunar new year, by compiling a list of bars that are the perfect alternatives to those candlelit restaurants we usually take our dates to on Valentine’s Day.

Margot Robbie talks her brutal, Oscar-worthy turn in I, Tonya
Movies

Margot Robbie talks her brutal, Oscar-worthy turn in I, Tonya

In I, Tonya—as high-octane and thrilling as biopics come—Margot Robbie skates into the role of a lifetime

The five best Chinese shrines to offer a prayer in Bangkok
Things to do

The five best Chinese shrines to offer a prayer in Bangkok

Whether you’re wishing for health, prosperity, luck in love or a better life, start off the new year by visiting one of these temples.

Latest restaurants and cafés review

Akira Back
Restaurants

Akira Back

Bangkok’s culinary scene has gotten just a little bit more exciting. Award-winning Korean-American chef Akira Back introduces Thais to his brand of cooking at his namesake restaurant in Bangkok Marriott Marquis Queen's Park hotel. Soaring above Sukhumvit on the 37th floor of the five-star hotel, Akira Back breaks new ground by offering cuisine that fuses Japanese, Korean and Western influences. Avid foodies would know who Akira Back is. But in case his name doesn’t ring a bell, Back is a US-based chef whose fame travels across continents. Prior to becoming a world-renowned culinary figure, he was a pro snowboarder and a part-time cook at local restaurants in his hometown of Colorado. Severe injuries from a snowboarding accident prematurely ended his career in extreme sports. Another door opens when one closes; Back decided to shift his path towards the kitchen, starting out as a prep cook at Kenichi restaurant in Aspen. This was soon followed by a senior position at the famed Yellowtail restaurant in Las Vegas, which eventually led to a decision to venture out on his own and launch his namesake brand.  Akira Back’s Bangkok outlet is a study in sleek, contemporary Asian décor. Japanese shinto ropes hold up elongated arches and provide an interesting canopy to the entire space. Abstract paintings by the chef's mother adorn the walls. The posh restaurant is an expansive space that can seat up to 100 diners at a time, composed of a main dining room, sushi bar, omakase bar and f

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Kika
Restaurants

Kika

Spanish director Pedro Almodóvar’s controversial film Kika was a big hit in the ’90s. Its absurd treatment of comedy involved a chaotic storyline, flamboyant costumes and oh-so-trashy moments, elements that endeared the film to audiences in Spain and beyond. When we heard that Julien Lavigne, the French mastermind behind Oskar Bistro on Sukhumvit Soi 11, was opening a restaurant of the same name, we expected a quirky place serving gimmick-heavy fare that require an acquired taste. As it turns out, Lavigne’s version of Kika is stripped off controversial notoriety; the kitchen, instead, offers delicious, comforting Spanish bites that would appeal to most food lovers. Located opposite Saint Joseph Convent School in Silom, Kika follows the similar path paved by other tapas bars in town. Interiors studded with rustic, wood-heavy details are anchored by a counter bar decorated with patterned Moorish tiles. Here, a team of cooks prepare cold dishes in front of diners against a backdrop of colorful canned produce and jars storing fermented veggies. One floor up is a space that offers more privacy but still retains a fun vibe courtesy of a modest-sized cocktail bar. A six-day gastronomic trip, during which Lavigne and his friends ate their way through Madrid and Barcelona, inspired Kika’s tapas-style plates. Jettisoning authenticity credentials, the eatery puts its own spin into Spanish delicacies by injecting culinary influences from the entire Mediterranean stretch and even touch

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
TE Time and Space
Restaurants

TE Time and Space

Four years after launching their brand, the brains behind loose-leaf tea specialist TE, Nanthida Ratanakul and Nattakit Udomsrirat, have opened their first brick-and-mortar tea café called TE Time and Space. 

Prelude
Restaurants

Prelude

An eatery in Thonglor featuring a neo-bistro concept

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Via Maris
Restaurants

Via Maris

A Soi Convent favorite breaks away from its Italian roots and now delivers exotic flavors spanning the entire Mediterranean  

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
find more bangkok restaurants

Latest bars review

Penthouse Rooftop
Bars

Penthouse Rooftop

Park Hyatt Bangkok has finally introduced the latest, last and topmost annex to Penthouse Bar + Grill, the lavish dining and drinking destination that occupies the luxury hotel’s top three floors. 

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
The 88
Bars

The 88

A cool cocktail bar that strongly focuses on American-style cocktails.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Sofia's Room
Bars

Sofia's Room

An unexpected gem in Soi Phaholyothin 2.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Asia Today
Bars

Asia Today

The new cocktail bar by the gents behind Teens of Thailand

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
find more bangkok bars and pubs

New movie releases

Black Panther
Movies

Black Panther

For all their global dominance, everybody wants these superhero movies to be better: funnier, smarter, more inclusive, more super. A huge step in the right direction, Black Panther is that dream come true. Proudly African—even if its Africa comes in the form of the fictional country of Wakanda, a powerhouse of secret technologies—Marvel’s latest is, from top to bottom, a conscious reversal of racial paradigms. Handsomely mounted by Creed director Ryan Coogler and starring an enviable slate of black actors that makes cameoing comics godhead Stan Lee almost seem lost, the film is provocative and satisfying in ways that are long overdue, like its ornate, culturally dense production design and the deeper subtexts of honor, compassion and destiny. Wakanda’s young king, T’Challa (a dignified Chadwick Boseman, well-seasoned after playing onscreen versions of James Brown, Jackie Robinson and Thurgood Marshall), recognizes that the world outside his peaceful realm is a divisive place. Still, even as his own armor-clad excursions as Black Panther set up an internal tension between isolationism and responsibility (yes, this is the rare blockbuster with something on its mind), tensions within Wakanda—fomented by exile-turned-rebel Erik Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan, on fire)—threaten to bring him down. In their script, Coogler and Joe Robert Cole take inspiration from the Black Panther’s 50-year history on the page, including a dazzling current run by author Ta-Nehisi Coates, and the fi

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Lady Bird
Movies

Lady Bird

A sweet, deeply personal portrayal of female adolescence that’s more attuned to the bonds between girlfriends than casual flings with boys, writer-director Greta Gerwig’s beautiful Lady Bird flutters with the attractively loose rhythms of youth. Anchored by an expressive mother-daughter story in which unconditional love and enmity often seem one and the same, and elevated by an entrancing Saoirse Ronan (easily among the best and most intimate actors of her generation), Gerwig’s accomplished second directorial effort makes you wish she’d spend more time behind the camera. With her keen ear for female familiarity (she cowrote Frances Ha and Mistress America), Gerwig sets Lady Bird during that exhilarating, confusing period known as high school senior year, when childhood-defining friendships start slipping away, hormones begin calling the shots and a better existence seems to await elsewhere. We follow the rebellious, opinionated Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson (Ronan, vanishing inside her funky, disorderly character) as she completes her final year of Catholic school in 2002. This is right after 9/11, during the Iraq War (often referenced in the background) and before cell phones got smart, further complicating teenagers’ lives. Lady Bird spends her days quarreling with her equally strong-willed mother, Marion (Laurie Metcalf, invincible), slacking off with her good-natured best friend, Julie (a pitch-perfect Beanie Feldstein), and dreaming of a liberal East Coast college, aw

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
I, Tonya
Movies

I, Tonya

Not the movie the notorious ice-skating flameout Tonya Harding probably deserves—but happily (for us) the one she’s gotten—I, Tonya is a dazzlingly complex and exuberant treatment of a disgraced figure. It flies along like Goodfellas: Director Craig Gillespie never passes up the chance to needle-drop on an instant-’80s pop song (from Supertramp, ZZ Top, etc.) or break the fourth wall with an into-the-lens confession. But as with Martin Scorsese’s “I always wanted to be a gangster” crime epic (or more aptly, Paul Thomas Anderson’s Boogie Nights), the combination of supercharged style with so tawdry a story creates an unshakable tension, the kind that has you laughing and cringing at the same time. Ultimately, I, Tonya feels like a major reclamation, not of Harding’s reputation but of the sports biopic itself, fallen into clichés since Raging Bull. Setting the tone with a surly, confrontational stare and her fuming lit cigarette, Margot Robbie—making the most of this gift of a role—drops the film into the touchy realm of paranoia and class warfare. She refuses to be judged in the film’s series of faux interviews, and even as Steven Rogers’s satisfying script sends us backward in time to the angelic young Tonya (Gifted’s Mckenna Grace) twirling on the ice, we’re never far from a scene in which money is the film’s not-so-secret subject. Her Oregonian mother, the raging LaVona (a revelatory Allison Janney, swearing up a storm), constantly browbeats her daughter about the cost of

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Den of Thieves
Movies

Den of Thieves

This gritty crime drama is so indebted to the work of Michael Mann, it might as well be called Residual Heat. In Den of Thieves, “Big Nick” (Gerard Butler, doing a Pacino on steroids) and Merrimen (Pablo Schreiber) are men on opposite sides of the law, each aligned with a crew of interchangeable muscle-shirt-wearing gym rats. Nick, despite being a cop, blusters about his disregard for following the rules. Merrimen is a bank robber with a moral code of not killing innocents. Den of Thieves spends its overly long runtime juggling action tropes but fails to establish a tone of its own. After opening on the heist of an armored truck, the movie shifts into a lower gear. The initial flurry of bullets is followed by a disparate collection of talk-heavy scenes, some intense and others playful. None of it coalesces. There’s no spectrum of personalities, no specific stakes for the characters, just a lot of sleeveless, morally ambiguous men. This boys’ club of a film is so unconcerned with its female characters that they’re repeatedly treated like property, to be either pimped out or protected. The directorial debut of London Has Fallen co-screenwriter Christian Gudegast, Den of Thieves steals elements from modern action thrillers—like a shoot-out in stopped traffic that resembles one in Sicario—as well as structural similarities to The Usual Suspects. Even the film’s funniest moment, when Merrimen and his gang intimidate a daughter’s prom date, is lifted from Bad Boys II. The amalgam

Time Out says
2 out of 5 stars

The latest Time Out interviews

The many facets of Piyarat Kaljareuk
LGBT

The many facets of Piyarat Kaljareuk

The Kantana heir on continuing the company's legacy, dealing with depression, supporting LGBT equality, and launching the localized version of RuPaul's Drag Race

Interview with Jidanun Lueangpiansamut
Art

Interview with Jidanun Lueangpiansamut

Meet the proud yaoi fiction author who became the youngest Thai to win Southeast Asia’s most prestigious writing award

Five minutes with Ton Thanasit
Music

Five minutes with Ton Thanasit

Academy Fantasia winner and soul singer Thanasit “Ton” Jaturaput steps back into the limelight. Here, he talks life after the reality show and everyday happiness

What's the deal with… Nonkul
Movies

What's the deal with… Nonkul

The Bad Genius standout and Thailand’s newest sweetheart makes his mark on primetime TV with the series, Shoot! I Love You

Where to stay in Bangkok

Mandarin Oriental Bangkok
Hotels

Mandarin Oriental Bangkok

Bangkok’s longest-running hotel isn’t praised for being one of the best hotels in the world for nothing. 

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
The Peninsula Bangkok
Hotels

The Peninsula Bangkok

Perhaps the most luxurious hotel on the other side of the river

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
The Okura Prestige Bangkok
Hotels

The Okura Prestige Bangkok

The Okura Prestige Bangkok has set a new standard for luxury hotels

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
W Bangkok
Hotels

W Bangkok

W Bangkok integrates twisted Thai culture with quirky Western motifs

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars