Your ultimate guide to Bangkok

Discover the best events, attractions, restaurants, bars, clubs and more in the city

The best street food in Bangkok
Restaurants

The best street food in Bangkok

Here are some of the best street food joints you have to try in Bangkok

Three new multi-brand shops you have to check out this month
Shopping

Three new multi-brand shops you have to check out this month

Here's Time Out guide to the new shops to visit right now in Bangkok

23 things to do in May you can't miss
Things to do

23 things to do in May you can't miss

Experience Bangkok with our list of best things to do in May featuring arts, music, and culture

Best places to Instagram in Bangkok [UPDATED]
Things to do

Best places to Instagram in Bangkok [UPDATED]

Food isn't the only thing Bangkok is best known for

Thonglor’s best cheap restaurants
Restaurants

Thonglor’s best cheap restaurants

Here’s our recommendations of the best cheap eateries in Thonglor.

Latest restaurants and cafés review

Yoong Chang
Restaurants

Yoong Chang

Ari is welcoming yet another trendy restaurant. Yoong Chang, a restaurant that describes itself as “Neo-Chinese,” specializes in combining multiple culinary traditions in one dish. The menu boasts creative combinations created by owner and head chef Kulapol “Air” Samsen, who studied at a cooking school in Hong Kong and worked at Michelin-starred Bangkok restaurant Gaa. The handmade biang biang noodles (from B160), which originated in Shaanxi Province in northern China, is a must-try—the restaurant claims to be the only one serving the dish in Bangkok. The long, thick and chewy noodles are made from wheat flour using the hand-pulling method. The noodles are prepared in advance at Yoong Chang, but are only stretched, pulled and boiled upon order, before they’re served in bone broth. Try the one with stir-fried beef curry and topped with raw egg yolk (B235), a variation adapted from his mother’s recipe, or the variation with smoked and roasted red pork (B215). The menu also includes Cantonese-style pork dumplings (B120) topped with Sichuanese sauce, echoing one appetizer dish in Sichuan cuisine; and the Hangzhou dish Dongpo pork (B160), here smoked with the American barbecue method, then sliced, burnt and served with rice, vegetables and the eatery’s special soy sauce recipe. For drinks, you can go for the chestnut milk (B90) or one of the flavored soda (from B75). A selection of alcoholic beverages is also available, including beer and a lychee liquor that mixes imported Soj

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Dai Lou
Restaurants

Dai Lou

Chinese theme have been enjoying a resurrection in recent years, with bars, cafés and restaurants displaying either retro or modern interpretations of this rich and colorful culture. Dai Lou, a Cantonese eatery in Ari, is next to take on the trend, displaying photogenic Chineseinspired décor, and serving progressive tapasstyle food with catchy names. Dai Lou, which means “big boss” in Cantonese, constructs a fictitious influential Chinese elite that people usually associate with Chinese movies (think The Bund and Infernal Affairs). Thus, the dining room is designed to represent the house of a Hong Kong boss man, but one with more subtle tastes. Instead of walls clad in red and gold, and gigantic Chinese statues, Dai Lou goes for white brick walls, globe lights and steel bar stools. Its courtyard is clad entirely in teal-colored mosaic tiles, inspired by the walls of subway stations in Hong Kong. The “big boss” is evidently a canine lover, as showcased by a dogshaped neon sign at the entrance, as well as dog “lucky charms” placed on each table. The menu is equally modern, featuring small dishes named after significant areas in Hong Kong. The crispy pork belly (B220) is named after Wan Chai, an area in the Chinese territory where people usually flock to savor the same dish. At Dai Lou, it’s a heavenly treat of crispy skin and tender meat, complemented by a sweet dipping sauce made from a “secret recipe.” Chek Lap Kok (B320), named after Hong Kong’s international airport, is a

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Grazia Gelato and Coffee
Restaurants

Grazia Gelato and Coffee

“To be honest, I have never come across real gelato here in Bangkok,” says Thanamas “Grace” Assadamongkolphan, who discovered her love for the Italy’s version of ice cream while taking up her master’s degree in fashion entrepreneurship at the Marangoni Fashion Institute in Milan. “I loved it so much that I wanted to open a gelato shop.” Grace approached the owner of Il Massimo del Gelato, her favorite gelato parlor in Milan with the hopes of bringing the franchise back to Thailand. As she had expected, the owner declined her offer, but suggested instead that she learn how to make it herself in an unnamed institution in Bergamo where the best recipes for this frozen treat come from. And that’s how the story of Grazia Gelato and Coffee began. As Grace explains, the difference between ice cream and gelato lies in the texture and richness of the mix. “Gelato incorporates less air so it comes with a silkier and more intense texture. Also, it contains almost 90 percent less fat because it has less amount of cream. And you can appreciate the actual taste of ingredients more in gelato.” Grace is proud of the gelato served at Grazia, which is tucked in an elegant townhouse in Bang Klaui that has been refurbished to look like a retro fashion studio, complete with arch details and vintage collectibles that Grace gathered whilst in Italy. For one, the gelato here is devoid of chemicals and emulsifiers, which are typically used as shortcuts at most ice cream parlors. But Grazia doesn’

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Karo Coffee Roasters
Restaurants

Karo Coffee Roasters

This coffeehouse by Sri Lanka-born roaster Karo Iyash occupies one floor of a shophouse on Soi Pridi Banomyong 26

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Cantina
Restaurants

Cantina

Following the success of its Italian trattoria in Ari, Soho Hospitality has opened the second branch of Cantina Pizzeria & Italian Kitchen

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
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Latest bars review

Perfect Strangers
Bars

Perfect Strangers

For many decades, Saphan Kwai has never been considered cool—the residential stretch has always been home to non-characteristic shophouses, rundown motels, decades-old restaurants, not to mention a number of that kind of massage parlors. Recently, however, an assortment of new restaurants, cafes, and bars have sprung up, injecting the beginnings of gentrification into the area. One of them is Perfect Strangers, a part-café-part-bar specializing in coffee drinks. Perfect Strangers is located within an imposing gray structure bearing the marked signature of modern industrial architecture. A4 papers printed with words like “OPEN,” “Hello Strangers,” and “Come Inside” are pasted on the façade, inviting passersby to take a second look and possibly venture inside. Swing the door open and find yourself in a high-ceilinged space that effectively combines marble, steel and polished wood. The bar is divided into two sections—one half features high-tech coffee makers like Mavam and Trinity One, while the other half is lined up with spirits and liquor bottles. The word “mocktails” might sound the alarm for overly-sweet and juice-heavy tipples—as we have encountered at similar establishments—but the bar team at Perfect Strangers is prone to producing well-balanced concoctions that do not overpower what’s seemingly a pervading key ingredient: coffee. “One thing that we have to be careful with when making coffee mocktails is putting in the espresso shot at the right time, so the crema of

Wet
Bars

Wet

Wet is fun and laidback, showcasing Gaggan’s take on the currently trendy natural wine bar concept

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Sul
Bars

Sul

Thonglor's latest gastrobar plays with traditional Korean elements and reconstructs them with innovative twists

008
Bars

008

It's unfortunate that the concept of the Prohibition—a temperance movement spanning the 1920s that banned alcohol consumption in the US, but ironically when the cocktail culture blossomed in the country—has been reduced into a marketing gimmick for many a retro-inspired cocktail bar. 008, a new secret bar in Thonglor hasrescued the concept by offering a drink menu that pays proper respect to the spirits of the era. Pailin “Milk” Sajjanit, the former head mixologist at Vesper and Zuma, and 2016 Diageo Southeast Asia World Class champion, is in charge. She makes sure the drinks are well-rounded and appropriately play along with the Prohibition theme. Inspired by the zeitgeist of the era, Pailin has come up with spirits-forward numbers with empowering names such as Great Power (B460). Based on a classic Manhattan recipe, this drink mixes Rittenhouse rye with oregano-infused Ysabel Regina brandy and aromatic bitters. Another signature drink, the 1920s (B360), is a more well-rounded version of Negroni, combining Whitley Dry Gin, Campari and clarified orange-infused vermouth. Forgotten Prohibition classics are also reinterpreted by Pailin. A drink called Pyroblast (B420) is inspired by a recipe from the cocktail tome, Lost Recipes of Prohibition by Matthew Rowley, and has been resurrected as a refreshing rum-based cocktail with coconut syrup and a “Pyroblast syrup” made of spices.  Apart from playing up the Prohibition theme, one of the agendas of 008 is to focus on classic cock

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
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New movie releases

Aladdin
Movies

Aladdin

Twenty-seven years after the release of the animated classic, Aladdin gets the live-action treatment, with Sherlock Holmes director Guy Ritchie at the helm. The well-known plot is the stuff of Disney magic: a rags-to-riches tale in which a common thief wins the heart of a princess with the help of a magic lamp that transforms him into a prince. If today's Aladdin is not quite a scene-for-scene remake, it’s pretty close. The plot is tweaked with some sensible improvements: Agrabah, a mythical Silk Road city, was once described in the original opening song as “barbaric.” It’s now simply chaotic, with a bustling population of people from as far as northern Europe (look out for Billy Magnussen’s hilarious Prince Anders) to China, and everywhere in between. It’s clear that this version of Aladdin celebrates the cultures from which the Arabian Nights folk tale emerged—a sensitivity no doubt learned (better late than never) from Black Panther, which provided an alternative to the typical white-savior motif. Canadian-Egyptian actor Mena Massoud perfectly captures Aladdin’s street-smart charm, while British-Gujarati actress Naomi Scott gives a fire-cracker performance as Princess Jasmine, showing she’s less concerned with finding a husband than learning the required skills to succeed her father (Navid Negahban) to the throne. Marwan Kenzari’s Jafar verges on pantomine villainy, but there’s no denying that he cuts a menacing figure. Best of all, the film is a proudly out-and-out mus

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
John Wick: Chapter 3—Parabellum
Movies

John Wick: Chapter 3—Parabellum

Review by Joshua Rothkopf “Prepare for war,” someone who knows Latin will tell you, if you ask about that subtitle, though it’s hardly necessary intel: In these gloriously dumb—but remarkably well-staged—gun-fu flicks, the war is already here, and it lasts for an entire film. Maybe others prefer it when Keanu Reeves talks; for me, he’s more effective when he moves. John Wick’s somber suit-clad NYC assassin has become his signature role, stripping down Speed and The Matrix into something John Woo sleek. Mob thugs killed his pet pit bull in the first installment. Those guys are long gone. Though this latest John Wick adventure brings on the usual distractions—Ian McShane’s fastidious boutique-hotel proprietor, Lawrence Fishburne’s booming king of the Bowery underworld, Halle Berry's lady with vicious dogs that leap straight for the crotch—mostly these characters stay out of the way of the main attraction. Instead, we’re here for the rigorously conceived, blessedly coherent action showdowns, the work of director Chad Stahelski (also Reeves’s longtime stunt double and choreographer). Stahelski is a fight-scene Fosse and Reeves is his Gwen Verdon: Parabellum takes the hall-of-mirrors high style of the second film and pushes it into overdrive. (Those who live in glass-walled galleries shouldn't throw anything at Wick.) The level of hard-R-rated bloodletting is so delirious, you’ll ignore how bad it is for you. A closed Manhattan Bridge is the perfect site for a sword duel on spee

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Pokémon Detective Pikachu
Movies

Pokémon Detective Pikachu

The story begins when ace detective Harry Goodman goes mysteriously missing, prompting his 21-year-old son Tim to find out what happened. Aiding in the investigation is Harry's former Pokémon partner, Detective Pikachu: a hilariously wise-cracking, adorable super-sleuth who is a puzzlement even to himself. Finding that they are uniquely equipped to communicate with one another, Tim and Pikachu join forces on a thrilling adventure to unravel the tangled mystery. Chasing clues together through the neon-lit streets of Ryme City - a sprawling, modern metropolis where humans and Pokémon live side by side in a hyper-realistic live-action world - they encounter a diverse cast of Pokémon characters and uncover a shocking plot that could destroy this peaceful co-existence and threaten the whole Pokémon universe.

Free Solo
Movies

Free Solo

Who knows what makes mountain climber Alex Honnold—the daredevil at the heart of the so-terrifying-you’ll-hyperventilate Free Solo—risk his life thousands of feet high without ropes or securing gear of any kind. Maybe it’s a quest for perfection, or a death wish, or a unique biological inability to feel fear, or a pursuit of the “goddamn warrior spirit” (his own words). All of these possibilities are suggested during the documentary’s running time, but in a way, you won’t want him explained. Just like the sheer rock face El Capitan that looms like a one-kilometer-tall challenge, Honnold himself is a force of nature: shy, prone to solitude and potentially on the spectrum of autism. He memorizes the complex moves in his climbing journal and waits for the right moment to head out, and up. Already a gripping watch, Free Solo becomes extra special when it widens out to accommodate the people hanging on to Honnold’s vertical trajectory. We see him transition from a dude living in a van practicing pull-ups and frying up a mess of eggs and potatoes to—what’s this?—becoming a love object to a doting girlfriend. Sanni McCandless takes huge emotional risks in getting close to Alex, who might die because of a single misstep, but his evolution through their relationship is heart-meltingly romantic—and ominous. Will it destroy his concentration? Meanwhile, a crew of rappelling cameramen, led by co-director Jimmy Chin, wrestles with its own ethical questions. Are they enabling decisions th

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars

The latest Time Out interviews

Naphat Siangsomboon
Movies

Naphat Siangsomboon

Get to know more about the young actor who—with his looks, lineage and sensitive smarts—seems bound for Asiawide success

James Teeradon and Cherprang Areekul
Movies

James Teeradon and Cherprang Areekul

The starlets talk about GDH’s new thriller-fantasy flick Homestay, and how it pushed them beyond their boundaries

Ryuichi Sakamoto
Music

Ryuichi Sakamoto

The musical polymath on his five-year documentary journey and the inspiration behind ‘async’, his first album in eight years.

Pat Chayanit
Movies

Pat Chayanit

Meet the actress who’s redefining what it means to be a teen star

Best hotels in Bangkok

Waldorf Astoria Bangkok

Waldorf Astoria Bangkok

The stunning, brand-new Waldorf Astoria Bangkok shoots up from the bustling Rachaprasong intersection like a flower; in fact, it was designed to look like one—a magnolia, to be exact. Inside, design elements by Hong Kong-based architect Andre Fu—such as wrought iron sculptural panels and an assortment of intricate chandeliers—pay homage to local Thai culture as well as the Waldorf legacy. The property boasts 171 rooms and suites, each with interactive entertainment systems, well-stocked mini bars and sprawling bathrooms with rainfall showers, high-tech toilets and toiletries by Salvatore Ferragamo. Guests have access to three restaurants, two bars and a tea room lounge; our favorites are the Front Room, a lobby-level eatery serving innovative Nordic-Thai fare, and the top floor Champagne Bar, offering flutes of bubbly to be enjoyed on plush green velvet couches overlooking the city below. A small (three rooms) but lovely spa sits next to the open air, rooftop pool, scattered with giant wicker chairs and affording one of the best views from the property. There's also a 24-hour fitness center, as well as the aforementioned lounge, Peacock Alley, perfect for whiling away the hours between city exploration and dinner—look for the clock behind the bar, a quiet nod to the storied hotel brand's first property in Manhattan (every Waldorf Astoria has a version of the first location's beautiful wall clock).  Time Out tip: Book ahead at the spa and the Front Room, both popular must-d

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
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W Bangkok
Hotels

W Bangkok

W Bangkok integrates twisted Thai culture with quirky Western motifs

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
The Okura Prestige Bangkok
Hotels

The Okura Prestige Bangkok

The Okura Prestige Bangkok has set a new standard for luxury hotels

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
SO Sofitel Bangkok
Hotels

SO Sofitel Bangkok

Gorgeous views and unique designs are the key reasons you’ll love SO Sofitel Bangkok. Located a few blocks away from Lumpini Park, the enclaves lush greenery can be spotted from most rooms. Room styles are crafted around four different themes: earth, water, wood and metal. The Earth rooms are embellished with playful, curvy walls inspired by prehistoric cave paintings found in Pha Taem National Park in Ubon Ratchathani. Metal rooms are decked out like an urban refuge with minimal, modern decor and pristine white furniture. The Wood room, on the other hand, is inspired by a traditional Northern Thai wooden house, while the Water room—the sexiest room of all—features concrete walls and semi-transparent glasses partitions.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars

Out of town

Check-in: JW Marriott Phu Quoc Emerald Bay
Travel

Check-in: JW Marriott Phu Quoc Emerald Bay

Get away to a Vietnam resort built around whimsy and fantasy

Doi Tung: a mountainous land transformed with love and nurtured with faith
Travel

Doi Tung: a mountainous land transformed with love and nurtured with faith

If you visited Doi Tung, one of Chiang Rai’s northernmost peaks, some 30 years ago and never had a chance to return, you’d barely recognized it today. The once desert-like mountains suffered from mobile plantation and—worse—opium planting; now, it’s one of the lushest areas in the north. Everything changed when Princess Srinagarindra, the grandmother of King Maha Vajiralongkorn, set up the Doi Tung Development Project in 1988 with an aim to improve the quality of both the people’s lives and the area they lived in. She even had a house built in the vicinity so she could watch her project grow at close range.     Learning from the consequences and successes of previous projects initiated by her son King Bhumibol, the Princess Mother opted to start out “small,” taking a slow contemplative pace—like with everything in her life. She didn’t want to merely give money to those in need; she wanted to help the people stand on their own feet, which is why she carefully created an environment and cultivated micro-industries that the community could benefit from. Thirty years have passed and, though Princess Srinagarindra didn’t get the chance to see Doi Tung in full bloom, her wish did come true. The once scraggly mountainside is now a lush plantation that produces gorgeous textile, paper and pottery—all trice handmade—and, most importantly, some of the world’s best macadamia nuts and coffee beans. Opium was replaced by harvests more beneficial to the community, both morall

5 reasons why you should visit the Maldives
Travel

5 reasons why you should visit the Maldives

November marks the beginning of the travel season in Thailand and Asia, and Maldives is one of the best holiday destinations you may want to consider.

The best of Tokyo (in 72 hours)
Travel

The best of Tokyo (in 72 hours)

For the second year, Time Out Bangkok’s editor (okay, that’s me) was invited to be one of the judges of Time Out Tokyo’s Love Tokyo Awards, which celebrates the best that the vibrant Japanese capital can offer. I joined editors from London, New York, Barcelona, Australia (Melbourne and Sydney), and China (Beijing and Shanghai). Like the year before, it was more or less like a treasure hunt—we were individually tasked to visit and experience (that means eating, drinking, shopping and, well, beyond) the shortlisted nominees for this year, all in three days. Time Out Tokyo staffers accompanied us to some venues to help communicate with the locals and to act as translators, but, for the most part, I got to visit and discover some places on my own, which was not a problem as—like many Thais—Tokyo is my holiday playground and very familiar to me. The complete list of winners and nominees is available on the Love Tokyo Awards website, but I’ll go ahead and share my best finds, greatest discoveries and most exciting experiences. Hopefully, it can come in handy especially for those who are visiting Tokyo this coming holiday season.