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These are six must-see local and international artists at Bangkok Art Biennale 2018
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These are six must-see local and international artists at Bangkok Art Biennale 2018

The much-awaited citywide Bangkok Art Biennale will finally launch this October. We take a look at some of the highlights and must-see exhibitions by six participating local and international artists you can't miss here.   Yayoi Kusama CentralWorld and Siam Paragon The needs-no-introduction Queen of Dots is bringing her eye-popping pieces to Bangkok for the first time in years (her last exhibition in the city was in 2005 at 100 Tonson Gallery). The 89-year-old Japanese contemporary artist will be exhibiting a set of 14 polkadotted pumpkins, which previously hung from the ceiling of Ginza Six mall in Tokyo, at CentralWorld. Her smaller pieces will also be shown for up-close viewing at Siam Paragon.   Marina Abramovic BACC and BAB Box at One Bangkok Award-winning Yugoslavian performance artist Marina Abramovic, whose physical communication shows have impressed millions of audiences around the world, will create a set of long-durational performances called The Method on 19 October and 11 November. The artist will also give a lecture on 23 October at Siam Pavalai, Siam Paragon.   Kawita Vatanajyankur CentralWorld, EmQuartier, The Peninsula Hotel, The East Asiatic Building, Theatre of Indulgence Video artist Kawita Vatanayangkur examines the topic of women’s rights by using her body to represent household appliances. Her work is so powerful that she became one of the very few Thai artists to have been invited to show at last year’s Venice Biennale as well as at S

Time Out meets 9x9
Movies

Time Out meets 9x9

One pretty boy is cool. Nine cuties are simply irresistible. These perfectly coiffed, stylishly clad young men are the fruit of 9x9, what was probably Thailand’s biggest, most exciting entertainment project in years.

Best nail salons in Bangkok to take your nail art to the next level
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Best nail salons in Bangkok to take your nail art to the next level

If you think neon-colored nails are too basic, this is for you

Wonderfruit
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Wonderfruit

The fauxhemian music festival is making a comeback in December. This year’s headliners include Bobby Pleasure, Costly Wood, Craig Richards, Felix Dickinson and Tishio Matsuura. Chill in different zones, and indulge in food from pop-ups by some of Bangkok’s most popular eateries.  

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Upcoming international concerts you shouldn't miss
Music

Upcoming international concerts you shouldn't miss

Latest restaurants and cafés review

Front Room
Restaurants

Front Room

A fine-dining restaurant that injects the Nordic philosophy of hygge into Thai produce

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Karmakamet Conveyance
Restaurants

Karmakamet Conveyance

Karmakarmet’s take on Asian-inspired fine-dining fare

Ginza Tenharu
Restaurants

Ginza Tenharu

A swanky tempura omakase joint at Gaysorn Village

La Dotta La Grassa
Restaurants

La Dotta La Grassa

La Dotta’s sister restaurant has amazing pasta and a whole lot more

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
PIzzeria Mazzie
Restaurants

PIzzeria Mazzie

This talk-of-the-town pizzeria brings the Big Apple’s favorite loaded pie to Ekkamai

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
find more bangkok restaurants

Latest bars review

Sugar Ray : You've Just Been Poisoned
Bars

Sugar Ray : You've Just Been Poisoned

The famed secret bar has been given a sleeker upgrade at a new Sukhumvit location

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
TaladNath
Bars

TaladNath

Funky cocktail bar specializing in fruit brandy and globe-spanning cocktails

The Bar Upstairs
Bars

The Bar Upstairs

A vibey wine bar has taken over the upper floor of French bistro Brasserie Cordonnier

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Middle Bar
Bars

Middle Bar

There's a new hidden bar in Soi Sukhumvit 36

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
find more bangkok bars and pubs

New movie releases

First Man
Movies

First Man

A stellar injustice: Hollywood has made a movie about a faked Mars landing—1977’s deliriously silly Capricorn One—but has never given the historic first moon landing its due. That’s not so hard to explain. While inspiring on a global scale, the 1969 accomplishment was pretty straightforward, dramatically speaking. Cool competence ruled the day and made it happen. The real thing was better than any film could be. Thrilling when it escapes the gravity of drab living rooms and offices, First Man does an admirable job of complexifying a well-told tale. It presents Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling, suitably square) as a guy who, in 1961, was both puncturing the barriers of human knowledge by flying experimental planes 140,000 feet over the Mojave Desert, as well as someone who was banging his head against the finite limits of a medical science that couldn’t save his daughter from a malignant brain tumor. Faced with that pain, Armstrong (if we’re to believe Josh Singer’s script, sourced from James R. Hansen’s authorized 2005 biography) did what many military men of the ’50s and ’60s did: shut off emotionally and turn inward. First Man makes Gosling colder than he was in Blade Runner 2049 as a replicant, itself a NASA-level achievement. Claire Foy, already stranded in one of those underwritten astronaut-wife roles, has so little to work with from Gosling, her big meltdown scene takes on a desperate grandeur. But you come to appreciate Gosling’s reserve, his shirt-and-tie starchiness

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Blindspotting
Movies

Blindspotting

A mercurial and explosive film, Blindspotting nimbly parses conflicts about race, rent, incarceration and gentrification. The film is set in bustling and bristling Oakland—a landscape that churns with spoken word as well as tensions between long-time residents and gentrifying tech hipsters. The protagonists are played by its eloquent screenwriters, Daveed Diggs (of Hamilton and Black-ish fame) and Rafael Casal. They portray Oakland natives who work at a removals company. Miles (Casal) is loyal to his friends and territorial to a fault; despite the moderating influence of his wife (played with memorable conviction by Jasmine Cephas Jones, Diggs’s Hamilton co-star), Miles’s hair-trigger fury is often ignited by instances of hipster encroachment. Soft-spoken parolee Collin (Diggs) dodges violence and tries to mitigate the chaotic leanings of his best friend. But early in the film, Collin witnesses a terrifying incident that threatens his post-incarceration plans. Blindspotting is a remarkably suspenseful film. Scenes swerve from hilarity to high tension, but the suspense is in service to a conscientious goal. Gun-filled sequences—despite set-ups worthy of Scorsese, Park Chan-wook or Antoine Fuqua—don’t often culminate in the expected bloodshed. It’s not perfect, and some of its mundane conversational episodes fall flat. But for the most part, the dialogue remains deft and the plot twists invigorating. This film engenders empathy for characters Hollywood often neglects, and it

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
A Star is Born
Movies

A Star is Born

Calling the new A Star Is Born a “valentine” from its star, Lady Gaga, to her fans sounds a bit coy and delicate, so let’s call it what it really is: a hot French kiss (with full-on tongue), filled with passion, tears and a staggering amount of chutzpah. Generously emotional and all the more fun for it, the movie functions as something akin to a Marvel-esque origin story, with Gaga’s own mythology—vamping it up at drag cabarets, etc.—subbing in for her character’s background. It's more than smart to have cast her; it's essential to the movie even working. But to watch her character, Ally, become a star—especially onstage during the film’s live moments, which feel frightening, massive and deafening—is an incredible piece of evolution. Gaga is really acting here: shy, somehow smaller, trembling with excitement. Incrementally, she blooms in the spotlight, proudly waving around that Streisand schnozz, the big voice completing the transformation. She’s extraordinary, and you root for her to go supernova per the scenario’s time-honored trajectory. Director-co-star Bradley Cooper has something else in mind, though. Just as his own performance—as Jackson Maine, this film’s rocker on the downslide—ends up being one of those grumbly beard chews (if you remember the 1976 version, you might describe it as "Kristoffersonian"), his steering of the drama is understated: modest and unshowy. He’s trying to make a “real” version of this glitziest of stories (whatever that means), and you lov

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Venom
Movies

Venom

Venom, a slick-skinned alien “symbiote” who first plagued Marvel’s Peter Parker back in a 1984 issue, has a Wikipedia entry roughly 8,400 words long. That’s not to say that the villain deserves his own film—even a silly one like Venom—or to be played by the jittery but sometimes inspired Tom Hardy of Mad Max: Fury Road and The Revenant. (A similar idea already came to the movies anyway, with 1987’s inventive body-swapper The Hidden.) It only suggests that a lot of people take even the marginalia of comics seriously, so seriously that they might not know when they’re getting shortchanged. It’s these superfans, not casual cineplexers expecting just another monolithic smackdown, who are going to feel the most crushed as Venom slides off the rails. When exactly does this happen? Is it when you realize that Hardy is going to be using a distracting Squiggy-esque Noo Yawk accent the whole time as Eddie Brock, a hard-charging San Francisco-based investigative journalist? Or when Eddie’s fiancée, Anne (poor Michelle Williams), supposedly a sharp lawyer, dumps him on the street, ring and all, after she gets fired by her Elon Musk-ish billionaire boss Carlton Drake (Riz Ahmed) after Eddie asks him a few uncomfortable questions about his mysterious labs? “Have a nice life,” we hear twice in a few minutes, a repetition that just feels like lazy screenwriting. Nope, the moment when it all slides into accidental comedy comes when the booming voice of the alien (Hardy again, aurally masked

Time Out says
2 out of 5 stars

The latest Time Out interviews

Ryuichi Sakamoto
Music

Ryuichi Sakamoto

The musical polymath on his five-year documentary journey and the inspiration behind ‘async’, his first album in eight years.

Pat Chayanit
Movies

Pat Chayanit

Meet the actress who’s redefining what it means to be a teen star

Wanchana Sawasdee
Movies

Wanchana Sawasdee

If there's an actor who's best known for playing the part of the patriotic hero, that would be Wanchana “Colonel Bird” Sawasdee. 

Twopee
Music

Twopee

Rapper-of-the-moment Twopee shares his thoughts on Thailand’s music scene.

Where to stay in Bangkok

W Bangkok
Hotels

W Bangkok

W Bangkok integrates twisted Thai culture with quirky Western motifs

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
The Okura Prestige Bangkok
Hotels

The Okura Prestige Bangkok

The Okura Prestige Bangkok has set a new standard for luxury hotels

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
SO Sofitel Bangkok
Hotels

SO Sofitel Bangkok

Gorgeous views and unique designs are the key reasons you’ll love SO Sofitel Bangkok. Located a few blocks away from Lumpini Park, the enclaves lush greenery can be spotted from most rooms. Room styles are crafted around four different themes: earth, water, wood and metal. The Earth rooms are embellished with playful, curvy walls inspired by prehistoric cave paintings found in Pha Taem National Park in Ubon Ratchathani. Metal rooms are decked out like an urban refuge with minimal, modern decor and pristine white furniture. The Wood room, on the other hand, is inspired by a traditional Northern Thai wooden house, while the Water room—the sexiest room of all—features concrete walls and semi-transparent glasses partitions.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
The Peninsula Bangkok
Hotels

The Peninsula Bangkok

Perhaps the most luxurious hotel on the other side of the river

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars