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Discover the best events, attractions, restaurants, bars, clubs and more in the city

These are the most anticipated movies of 2019
News

These are the most anticipated movies of 2019

Thrilling superhero sagas and bold live-action adaptations light up the screens this 2019. Here’s a shortlist of films worth buying a second tub of popcorn for.   

Best wallet-friendly rooftop bars in Bangkok
Bars

Best wallet-friendly rooftop bars in Bangkok

Swoon-worthy panoramic views and great tipples don’t have to come with lofty prices at these value-for-money rooftop bars.

Best things to do in Thonburi
Things to do

Best things to do in Thonburi

2018 marks the 250th anniversary of Thonburi. We celebrate the occasion by taking you to explore the snaking alleys and winding roads of the old town, and make your down Pran Nok pier to Wat Kalayanamit pier to discover the many gems Thonburi has to offer.  

Time Out Bangkok Gift Guide 2019
Shopping

Time Out Bangkok Gift Guide 2019

Season's greetings, Bangkok! Are you still trying to figure out what gifts to give loved ones for the holidays? Relax, we've got you covered. The Time Out Bangkok Gift Guide 2019 is packed with ideas guaranteed to satisfy friends and family members--even the picky ones. Enjoy shopping!

Time Out Bangkok's most favorite new restaurants of 2018
Restaurants

Time Out Bangkok's most favorite new restaurants of 2018

Bangkok's dining scene in 2018 was flavorful. We're excited to see all kinds of drool-worthy openings, from Michelin-worthy fine-dining Thai to the city's first Thai-Nordic eatery to a casual pizzeria that blows our mind. Here, let's take a look back at our most favorite new openings of all 2018. 

Latest restaurants and cafés review

Time Out meets Banyen Ruangsantheia
Restaurants

Time Out meets Banyen Ruangsantheia

Meet the 62-year-old Thai chef who has given Suan Thip, a humble Nonthaburi eatery, a Michelin star

Rossaneh
Restaurants

Rossaneh

A seriously good khao gaeng eatery worth trekking out of town for

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Landhaus
Restaurants

Landhaus

Thanks to Oktoberfest that has now been celebrated all over the world, you must have been so much familiar with Bavarian food and beer. But do you know that Bavarian breads have more kind than just sourdough and pretzel? Now, your chance to explore the many more varieties of Bavarian bread is here, with Landhaus, a new bakery in Ari that has taken the concept and recipes from its bigger sister in Austria, Gragger & Cie, to become one of the very few places in Bangkok that offers the most authentic Austrian-Bavarian taste. With the name that means ‘a farmhouse’ in German, the bakery flaunts itself as its name suggests: a tiny, homey white house with raw-cement walls, natural wood furniture, and a giant wooden table loaded freshly baked goodies—the space is all decorated in a bare minimal manner. In one corner, a coffee machine is at the ready to brew you smell-so-good coffee from beans from Northern part of Thailand. Despite adopting the Austrian-born recipe, Landhaus opts for a sustainable (and more practical and affordable) approach by making breads using locally sourced, natural ingredients—all of which will be carefully baked in a custom-made wood-fired oven built after the original oven at Gragger & Cie in Austria. (The bakery also donates leftover breads to a neighboring school or anyone in need instead of throwing them away.) The menu comes packed with loaded choices of pastry. Being indecisive? Go for one of their sets. The Austrian breakfast set (B250) comes with

Saucey
Restaurants

Saucey

Sathorn’s leafy alley is now home to a cozy beach-inspired restobar serving fried chicken and beer bombs

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Na-Oh
Restaurants

Na-Oh

A luxurious airplane restaurant serving “futuristic” fare

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
find more bangkok restaurants

Latest bars review

The Loft
Bars

The Loft

Waldorf Astoria Bangkok’s high-altitude bar gives a contemporary spin on classic cocktails from The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Ku Thai Bar
Bars

Ku Thai Bar

A rustic beach-inspired bar set in an old Thai pavilion

The Key
Bars

The Key

The hip hood of Ari has just welcomed a new face to its cocktail scene

Sugar Ray : You've Just Been Poisoned
Bars

Sugar Ray : You've Just Been Poisoned

The famed secret bar has been given a sleeker upgrade at a new Sukhumvit location

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
find more bangkok bars and pubs

New movie releases

Aquaman

Aquaman

Jason Momoa's surf-bro superhero is a welcome addition to a ponderous genre, but his movie as a whole is waterlogged. If you’ve ever wanted to watch a five-course seafood dinner have an epic battle before your eyes (as infantile and wonderful as that sounds), Aquaman’s final 20 minutes will be your new favorite thing. Gargantuan lobsters and crabs—hailing from the “Kingdom of Brine,” of course—rumble against weaponized sharks and an armada of creatures that swim by in a blur of bubbles. Howling above the din with his trident and golden armor is mega-tattooed Arthur (Jason Momoa, wearing this superhero stuff extremely lightly, and all the more charming for it), or, as he’ll come to be known, Aquaman. As helmed by director James Wan, who has grown from 2004’s rough-and-ready Sawinto a playful steward of big-budget ridiculousness (Furious 7), Aquaman seems inspired by some of the more psychedelic panels devoted to DC Comics’s water-breathing warrior—pages filled to the brim with gob-smacked fascination with the world below, in all its colorful diversity. But getting to that delirious showdown feels like holding your breath for two hours. Certain audience members will care deeply about who becomes “Ocean Master,” the ruler from among the warring factions of the mythical city of Atlantis and elsewhere, just as there must be those who wonder about who will win Game of Thrones. But all the exposition is deadening, even with brave actors like Nicole Kidman and Willem Dafoe delivering it. “The king has risen,” Dafoe intones, answering the film’s least suspenseful question (and possibly remembering when he starred in stuff like The Last Temptation of Christ). Instead of trying to surf every wave, it’s better to let this one flow over you, like composer Rupert Gregson-Williams’s bloopy score, a lovable throwback to the 1970s work of synth wizard Jean-Michel Jarre. Some fleeting moments are inspired: a dark, plunging escape from the Creatures of the Trench, illuminated by a single red flare; a striding emergence from the sea scored to a dance cover of Toto’s “Africa”; a Sicily-set sequence in which Arthur and his redheaded squeeze Mera (Amber Heard, committed to the crazy) come off like honeymooners—until they start destroying priceless statuary like a pair of ugly Atlantean tourists. Aquaman is more seawater than bongwater, unfortunately, but when it gets trippy, it floats within hailing distance of Doctor Strange.

Ralph Breaks the Internet
Movies

Ralph Breaks the Internet

With so many animation franchises content to tread water—or in one interminable case, ice—it’s seriously refreshing to see a sequel that’s not only an upgrade on the original, but more thoughtful too. If Wreck-It Ralph launched us head-first into a 16-bit wonderland fit to blow the synapses of bright-eyed kids and weathered gamers alike, this surprisingly vibrant follow-up is a giddy, sugar-coated joy. And it’s an expansion pack that plugs in plenty of new ideas: about friendship, insecurity and the mind-bending transience of the online world. It’s not every animation that features an eBay-spoofing riff involving a corn chip shaped like Beyoncé. The story sends arcade-villain-turned-good guy Ralph (voiced by John C. Reilly) and his new BFF, arcade racer Vanellope von Schweetz (Sarah Silverman), into the internet to find a new part for her broken arcade game. Their arcade’s newly installed “wifey”, as the endearingly slow-on-the-uptake Ralph calls it, is a portal to a host of opportunities for witty visual representations of cyberspace. If it’s sometimes a touch literal—the internet is a sci-fi city filled with buildings marked “Amazon” and “IMDb” and (presumably for legal reasons) “Buzzfood”—the finer world-building is sharp. Every facet of cyberspace has a walking, talking avatar, including a patronizing search engine that notes its “autofill is a touch aggressive today,” and weasely clickbait pop-ups that are shunted aside by ad-blockers clad like burly security men. Refr

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald
Movies

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald

The first Fantastic Beasts had a lot of heavy lifting to do. It needed to establish a world connected to the Harry Potter universe, but also one that was self-contained. It had to introduce several busloads of new characters and kick off a story complex enough to sustain another four movies (at least). With all that done, the second instalment should have earned itself some breathing room, a bit of time to cut loose and enjoy the possibilities of a new magical universe. But as beautiful and inventive as it is, The Crimes of Grindelwald often feels like we’re starting the world-building all over again. Trying to establish where everyone is at the beginning of this sequel without giving too much away is going to get confusing, so our apologies in advance. Fascist wizard Gellert Grindelwald (Johnny Depp, looking rough) has broken out of jail in London and fled to Paris to lay the groundwork for an uprising. In order to stop him, the wizarding government approaches Grindelwald’s ex-friend Albus Dumbledore (Jude Law, relishing his fairly brief screen time), who refuses the mission but enlists the help of animal-lover Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne) for a more secret version of the same mission. There are about eight other major characters involved, but we’ve only got so much space. Short version: A wizard war is a-brewing. Moving most of the action to Paris gives the film’s creative team the opportunity to run wild with some gorgeous production design. Visually, the world couldn

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Robin Hood
Movies

Robin Hood

A war-hardened Crusader and a Moorish commander mount an audacious revolt against the corrupt English crown in a thrilling action-adventure. Packed with gritty battlefield exploits, mind-blowing fight choreography, and a timeless romance, ROBIN HOOD is a never before seen story of how Robin Hood became the icon and legend as we know him today.

The latest Time Out interviews

James Teeradon and Cherprang Areekul
Movies

James Teeradon and Cherprang Areekul

The starlets talk about GDH’s new thriller-fantasy flick Homestay, and how it pushed them beyond their boundaries

Ryuichi Sakamoto
Music

Ryuichi Sakamoto

The musical polymath on his five-year documentary journey and the inspiration behind ‘async’, his first album in eight years.

Pat Chayanit
Movies

Pat Chayanit

Meet the actress who’s redefining what it means to be a teen star

Wanchana Sawasdee
Movies

Wanchana Sawasdee

If there's an actor who's best known for playing the part of the patriotic hero, that would be Wanchana “Colonel Bird” Sawasdee. 

Best hotels in Bangkok

W Bangkok
Hotels

W Bangkok

W Bangkok integrates twisted Thai culture with quirky Western motifs

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
The Okura Prestige Bangkok
Hotels

The Okura Prestige Bangkok

The Okura Prestige Bangkok has set a new standard for luxury hotels

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
SO Sofitel Bangkok
Hotels

SO Sofitel Bangkok

Gorgeous views and unique designs are the key reasons you’ll love SO Sofitel Bangkok. Located a few blocks away from Lumpini Park, the enclaves lush greenery can be spotted from most rooms. Room styles are crafted around four different themes: earth, water, wood and metal. The Earth rooms are embellished with playful, curvy walls inspired by prehistoric cave paintings found in Pha Taem National Park in Ubon Ratchathani. Metal rooms are decked out like an urban refuge with minimal, modern decor and pristine white furniture. The Wood room, on the other hand, is inspired by a traditional Northern Thai wooden house, while the Water room—the sexiest room of all—features concrete walls and semi-transparent glasses partitions.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
The Peninsula Bangkok
Hotels

The Peninsula Bangkok

Perhaps the most luxurious hotel on the other side of the river

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars

Out of town

Doi Tung: a mountainous land transformed with love and nurtured with faith
Travel

Doi Tung: a mountainous land transformed with love and nurtured with faith

If you visited Doi Tung, one of Chiang Rai’s northernmost peaks, some 30 years ago and never had a chance to return, you’d barely recognized it today. The once desert-like mountains suffered from mobile plantation and—worse—opium planting; now, it’s one of the lushest areas in the north. Everything changed when Princess Srinagarindra, the grandmother of King Maha Vajiralongkorn, set up the Doi Tung Development Project in 1988 with an aim to improve the quality of both the people’s lives and the area they lived in. She even had a house built in the vicinity so she could watch her project grow at close range.     Learning from the consequences and successes of previous projects initiated by her son King Bhumibol, the Princess Mother opted to start out “small,” taking a slow contemplative pace—like with everything in her life. She didn’t want to merely give money to those in need; she wanted to help the people stand on their own feet, which is why she carefully created an environment and cultivated micro-industries that the community could benefit from. Thirty years have passed and, though Princess Srinagarindra didn’t get the chance to see Doi Tung in full bloom, her wish did come true. The once scraggly mountainside is now a lush plantation that produces gorgeous textile, paper and pottery—all trice handmade—and, most importantly, some of the world’s best macadamia nuts and coffee beans. Opium was replaced by harvests more beneficial to the community, both morall

5 reasons why you should visit the Maldives
Travel

5 reasons why you should visit the Maldives

November marks the beginning of the travel season in Thailand and Asia, and Maldives is one of the best holiday destinations you may want to consider.

The best of Tokyo (in 72 hours)
Travel

The best of Tokyo (in 72 hours)

For the second year, Time Out Bangkok’s editor (okay, that’s me) was invited to be one of the judges of Time Out Tokyo’s Love Tokyo Awards, which celebrates the best that the vibrant Japanese capital can offer. I joined editors from London, New York, Barcelona, Australia (Melbourne and Sydney), and China (Beijing and Shanghai). Like the year before, it was more or less like a treasure hunt—we were individually tasked to visit and experience (that means eating, drinking, shopping and, well, beyond) the shortlisted nominees for this year, all in three days. Time Out Tokyo staffers accompanied us to some venues to help communicate with the locals and to act as translators, but, for the most part, I got to visit and discover some places on my own, which was not a problem as—like many Thais—Tokyo is my holiday playground and very familiar to me. The complete list of winners and nominees is available on the Love Tokyo Awards website, but I’ll go ahead and share my best finds, greatest discoveries and most exciting experiences. Hopefully, it can come in handy especially for those who are visiting Tokyo this coming holiday season.

Pai mai?
Travel

Pai mai?

Pai in the '80s was a small village populated only by a cluster of locals and few backpackers in the know. But secrets can't be kept for long. In recent years, it's been transformed into one of the most visited mountain destinations in Thailand—with numerous tourist sites (and traps), guesthouses and restaurants sprouting along its dusty streets. However, Pai is far from losing its charm. Despite now catering to more tourists than ever, the village is still a beautiful and peaceful place everyone can fall in love with.    Come in November, when the rains let up and the temperature dips, Pai invites the intrepid to witness the different facets ofits humble beauty. Here are the reasons why Pai should become the next destination on your bucket list.    You can now say "no" to the life-threatening minivan ride    There used to be only one way to get from Chiang Mai to Pai — via a minivan ride through the notorious Route 1095 that takes you through 762 steep and winding curves. Now thanks to Kan Air, there is a daily connection from Chiang Mai (weather permitted) on a small 12-seater, single-engine turboprop that looks slightly like a run-down minivan from the inside (you need to buckle up and no cellphone is allowed on board). Though a claustrophobic nightmare, the 25-minute ride unveils a stunning bird's-eye view of Pai's lush geography. Roundtrip from B2,380.       There are plenty of lnstagram-worthy viewpoints   Surrounded by mighty mountains and dense jungles