Your ultimate guide to Bangkok

Discover the best events, attractions, restaurants, bars, clubs and more in the city

Meet the masterminds behind local brands you must check out this summer
Shopping

Meet the masterminds behind local brands you must check out this summer

As summer kicks in, we shine the spotlight on four up-and-coming brands that are heating up the local fashion scene

Three ways to make the most of your vacay in Phuket
News

Three ways to make the most of your vacay in Phuket

[Sponsored] Explore the very best of Phuket with Best Western’s trio of stylish hotels in three desirable destinations on the idyllic island.  

The best khao chae restaurants in Bangkok
Restaurants

The best khao chae restaurants in Bangkok

We list down our favorite restaurants offering the best khao chae, a traditional Thai dish serving in the hot summer months

Nong Pear Pa Ploen: "I want to become a makeup artist in Hollywood."
Health and beauty

Nong Pear Pa Ploen: "I want to become a makeup artist in Hollywood."

Meet the young—really young—makeup vlogger, who, at the age of 10, became the youngest artist to ever touch up faces at London Fashion Week 2018

The best rooftop bars in Bangkok
Bars

The best rooftop bars in Bangkok

See how Bangkok actually looks beneath your feet at the city’s best rooftop bars. 

Latest restaurants and cafés review

Nihon Saiseisakaba
Restaurants

Nihon Saiseisakaba

Feast on pig’s rectum, pharynx and bronchus at a new motsuyaki eatery on Sukhumvit

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
No.43 Italian Bistro
Restaurants

No.43 Italian Bistro

[Sponsored] Refreshingly Italian, and a sumptuous gastronomic experience, No.43 has established its firm reputation and renown in Bangkok through giving its guests the relaxed feel of a true Italian Bistro. 

Broken Eggs
Restaurants

Broken Eggs

A hip Spanish gastrobar in Ekkamai churning out tapas bites with global influences

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Pirate Saloon
Restaurants

Pirate Saloon

The first floor of the complex formerly known as Seenspace comes back to life as a pirate-themed eatery serving comfort fare and fruity cocktails

La Scala
Restaurants

La Scala

The Italian establishment at Sukhothai Bangkok makes a major comeback, ditching traditional recipes for more contemporary preparations

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
find more bangkok restaurants

Latest bars review

A Bar
Bars

A Bar

Two differently themed venues—a Victorian-inspired cocktail den and an alfresco rooftop space—set A Bar apart from the other hotel bars in the city

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
F.Orange
Bars

F.Orange

A cool dive bar in Phra Khanong that plays up a quirky, art-fueled aesthetic

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Penthouse Rooftop
Bars

Penthouse Rooftop

Park Hyatt Bangkok has finally introduced the latest, last and topmost annex to Penthouse Bar + Grill, the lavish dining and drinking destination that occupies the luxury hotel’s top three floors. 

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
The 88
Bars

The 88

A cool cocktail bar that strongly focuses on American-style cocktails.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
find more bangkok bars and pubs

New movie releases

Rampage
Movies

Rampage

The ’80s arcade classic Rampage allowed players to inhabit the avatars of rabid mutant animals as they punched helicopters, ate people and demolished cities. That premise is a bit obvious for a major studio feature, but star Dwayne Johnson and director Brad Peyton, improving on their 2015 lemon San Andreas, have taken the title and basic thrust of the video game (smash things!) and delivered a colorful, cornball disaster spectacle. Rampage isn’t cause for wild celebration, but with its bright, coherent FX—rare in this genre—and one deliriously fun supporting performance, it’s better than it has any business being. The movie opens with a knockout action sequence, set aboard a space station that’s been overtaken by a gargantuan lab rat. (For fans of the video game, this rodent is the first of several Easter eggs.) The pathogen that’s loose in the space station, which turns animals into supersized killing machines, makes its way back to Earth and is ingested by a crocodile, a wolf and an albino gorilla named George. This simian star provides an emotional element, via friendship and sign language with primatologist Davis (Dwayne Johnson, doing his thing), and sets the story in motion when he destroys a wildlife sanctuary on his way to a rendezvous with his fellow mutants in Chicago. Johnson joins with Naomie Harris, radiating smarts as a genetic engineer, to quell George and minimize the damage. Good luck with that: The annihilation of the Windy City is a thrill to watch—cartoo

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Blockers
Movies

Blockers

Proving once again—especially after last year’s Girls Trip and The Big Sick—that comedies are the undiscovered country for expert (if not Oscar-nominated) acting, Blockers gives the willowy, trembling Leslie Mann two bookends that are, without a doubt, her finest onscreen moments. In the first, she’s offering tame suggestions to her prom-bound, sex-minded daughter (“Mom, are you going to be okay?” the kid asks, legit concerned). In the next, the tears rain down Mann’s face like a shower with robust water pressure—is it even audible?—as she’s saying upbeat goodbyes to a child with college on the horizon. In between those two scenes comes a wonderfully crude film (we're talking Superbad levels of raunchiness), but one in which the overall vibe is sweet: kids patiently waiting for their parents to grow up already. On the occasion of their daughters' big high-school dance, three fussy helicopter parents (Mann, Ike Barinholtz and a revelatory John Cena, a hulking, teary-eyed mess) become aware of their girls' plan to devirginize. Furious at this "sex pact"—it even has its own hashtag, #SEXPACT2018—the olds decide to mount a counteraction; the movie's title once had another word before Blockers, a synonym for rooster, before advertising standards kicked in. Snappily directed by debuting director Kay Cannon (a screenwriter on the Pitch Perfect trilogy and, more substantially, TV’s 30 Rock), Blockers brews a bubbling panic among the parents, invading where they shouldn’t and brandi

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Midnight Sun
Movies

Midnight Sun

After the Twilight saga, we’re used to young-adult romances involving pale sun-dodgers with mysterious depths. The twist with this one is that there’s nothing supernatural about nocturnal teenage guitarist Katie (Bella Thorne). She suffers from a rare genetic disorder called xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which means her body is unable to repair the damage caused by ultraviolet light. In other words, the sun can literally kill her. It’s an extreme obstacle to put in the way of her finding happiness with childhood crush Charlie, a boy she’s watched from her window most of her life, and who’s grown into the handsome form of Patrick "Son of Arnold" Schwarzenegger. (It’s worth noting this is a relatively straight adaptation of the 2006 Japanese teen drama Taiyo No Uta, not that the target audience will have seen the original.) To be frank, the medical disorder is about the only aspect of this story that lends it any distinction. Midnight Sun is otherwise a bland mix of familiar types (the doofus Dad, the quirky best friend who wears woolly hats indoors, etc.) who trundle along the rails of a predictable plot, one that relies on Katie preposterously keeping her illness a secret from Charlie until it inevitably catches up with her in a Cinderella-ish manner. Leads Thorne and Schwarzenegger are mildly charming in a TV-soapish way, but it’s all so desperately clean (even her XP is photogenic, unlike the condition in reality). The stars struggle to hold your interest, let alone earn y

Time Out says
2 out of 5 stars
A Quiet Place
Movies

A Quiet Place

Like Aliens retooled as a militant librarian’s fantasy, actor-director John Krasinski’s relentlessly effective horror film thrives on a nifty premise: In a post-apocalyptic world, a family holes up in a farmhouse and tries to survive in a countryside where the slightest sound brings out deadly monsters. It’s a high concept that demands the dialogue be kept to a minimum; characters communicate by subtitled sign language, eye contact and extreme whispering. That makes A Quiet Place pure, bold cinema, the images and sound design working together to scare the bejesus out of you. Save some late-in-the-day exposition via basement whiteboards and newspaper headlines, Krasinski gives us admirably little backstory for the alien invasion. Instead, after a tragic prologue, we find a family—dad (Krasinski), mom (Emily Blunt), son (Noah Jupe) and daughter (Wonderstuck’s Millicent Simmonds), whose deafness means she can’t hear anything sneaking up on her—neck-deep in real trouble. Nerve-shredding set pieces revolve around a nail sticking out of a wooden stair, a flooding basement and a Signs–like run through a cornfield. All are mounted with ruthless brio by director Krasinski, fully escaping his cuddly Office niche. The rules of this universe are fast and loose, so the monsters can’t hear over a waterfall, but they can listen through walls from miles away. And while the family dynamics lack nuance, the film is still a neat allegory for the challenges of parenting pushed to extremes. It’

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars

The latest Time Out interviews

What's the deal with… Phum Viphurit
Music

What's the deal with… Phum Viphurit

Get to know Thailand’s “Lover Boy,” who may just be on his way to becoming Asia’s newest Neo Soul sweetheart

The many facets of Piyarat Kaljareuk
LGBT

The many facets of Piyarat Kaljareuk

The Kantana heir on continuing the company's legacy, dealing with depression, supporting LGBT equality, and launching the localized version of RuPaul's Drag Race

Interview with Jidanun Lueangpiansamut
Art

Interview with Jidanun Lueangpiansamut

Meet the proud yaoi fiction author who became the youngest Thai to win Southeast Asia’s most prestigious writing award

Five minutes with Ton Thanasit
Music

Five minutes with Ton Thanasit

Academy Fantasia winner and soul singer Thanasit “Ton” Jaturaput steps back into the limelight. Here, he talks life after the reality show and everyday happiness

Where to stay in Bangkok

Mandarin Oriental Bangkok
Hotels

Mandarin Oriental Bangkok

Bangkok’s longest-running hotel isn’t praised for being one of the best hotels in the world for nothing. 

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
The Peninsula Bangkok
Hotels

The Peninsula Bangkok

Perhaps the most luxurious hotel on the other side of the river

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
The Okura Prestige Bangkok
Hotels

The Okura Prestige Bangkok

The Okura Prestige Bangkok has set a new standard for luxury hotels

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
W Bangkok
Hotels

W Bangkok

W Bangkok integrates twisted Thai culture with quirky Western motifs

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars