Bars & Pubs

Time Out's definitive guide for the best places to drink in Bangkok

The best cocktail bars in Bangkok
Bars

The best cocktail bars in Bangkok

Bangkok's greatest venues with their unrivaled cocktail concoctions. 

Bangkok's best bars and clubs
Nightlife

Bangkok's best bars and clubs

We've rounded up the best bars and clubs in the city. Find them in the lively neighborhoods of Silom, Thonglor and Soi Nana Chinatown.

Best speakeasy bars in Bangkok
Bars

Best speakeasy bars in Bangkok

A watering hole hidden behind a discreet entryway is no longer a novelty. The thrill of discovering a joint’s secret entrance only works the first time, but it’s the love, passion, and ideas that go into creating the bar and its spirits-fuelled concoctions that will keep luring you back. And these bars are that kind of place. 

The best rooftop bars in Bangkok
Bars

The best rooftop bars in Bangkok

See how Bangkok actually looks beneath your feet at the city’s best rooftop bars. 

Best Train-themed Bars in Bangkok
Bars

Best Train-themed Bars in Bangkok

If going to a normal bar doesn't turn you up anymore, maybe you need something new like themed bars. So we gather three best train-themed bars that will make you feel like you are on a journey to somewhere without going anywhere.

Latest Bangkok bar reviews

Wet
Bars

Wet

Wet is fun and laidback, showcasing Gaggan’s take on the currently trendy natural wine bar concept

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Sul
Bars

Sul

Thonglor's latest gastrobar plays with traditional Korean elements and reconstructs them with innovative twists

008
Bars

008

It's unfortunate that the concept of the Prohibition—a temperance movement spanning the 1920s that banned alcohol consumption in the US, but ironically when the cocktail culture blossomed in the country—has been reduced into a marketing gimmick for many a retro-inspired cocktail bar. 008, a new secret bar in Thonglor hasrescued the concept by offering a drink menu that pays proper respect to the spirits of the era. Pailin “Milk” Sajjanit, the former head mixologist at Vesper and Zuma, and 2016 Diageo Southeast Asia World Class champion, is in charge. She makes sure the drinks are well-rounded and appropriately play along with the Prohibition theme. Inspired by the zeitgeist of the era, Pailin has come up with spirits-forward numbers with empowering names such as Great Power (B460). Based on a classic Manhattan recipe, this drink mixes Rittenhouse rye with oregano-infused Ysabel Regina brandy and aromatic bitters. Another signature drink, the 1920s (B360), is a more well-rounded version of Negroni, combining Whitley Dry Gin, Campari and clarified orange-infused vermouth. Forgotten Prohibition classics are also reinterpreted by Pailin. A drink called Pyroblast (B420) is inspired by a recipe from the cocktail tome, Lost Recipes of Prohibition by Matthew Rowley, and has been resurrected as a refreshing rum-based cocktail with coconut syrup and a “Pyroblast syrup” made of spices.  Apart from playing up the Prohibition theme, one of the agendas of 008 is to focus on classic cock

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Dr. Fetch
Bars

Dr. Fetch

Octo Seafood Bar has made its name to Sukhumvit’s dining scene as a one-stop seafood destination with eye-striking giant octopus clinging majestically at the very store front. Helping to fulfill the ocean theme of the shipshaped restaurant is a cocktail bar serving cocktails with references to the underwater world. Perching on the second floor of the seafoodcentric complex, Dr. Fetch is embedded with narratives alluding to a laboratory hidden underwater operating by a fictional scientist. That explains the reasons why all the bartenders are dressed up in white laboratory gown. In contrast to the bright restaurant setting, the inside of Dr. Fetch is dimly-lit and succumbed to the heavy beats from live band performing nightly. If you look for a more private corner, take a seat in a connect room quirkily surrounded by wooden rabbits and animal skeletons. To comply with the bustling seafood restaurant downstairs, Dr. Fetch cocktails are conjured up with strong influence from the sea — dominantly via the name of the cocktails, garnishes and the shape of the glasses, not in the drink as we had expected. There’s the Pirate Spice Rum (B400), the concoction photogenically served in a siphon machine with the combination of pea flower-infused rum, toasted coconut and Maraschino liqueur brewed with lemongrass, ginger and butter, before being served hot in a Chinese-style tea cup. (The item is big enough to feed 3-4 people). Ocean Bouquet (B400) is nicely-flavored with accent of spicy a

The best bars and pubs in Bangkok

The best beer bars in Bangkok
Bars

The best beer bars in Bangkok

Beer bars have been popping up all over Bangkok, especially in the past five years. And because we believe that happy hour should start with heavenly hops, we’ve scoped out the places that serve the best malted tipples in the city.

The 88
Bars

The 88

Since barbecue specialist Smokin’ Pug said farewell to Surawong Road for a more spacious outpost in Soi Langsuan, the edgy vibe has gone missing from an area that’s notoriously filled with tourist traps (think knock-off souvenir shops and those kinds of massage parlors). Luckily, the vacant space was quickly filled up by a new tenant. And it’s a cool cocktail bar that strongly focuses on American-style cocktails. This new watering hole, which sits in shophouse number 88 on Surawong Road, has done its best to keep Smokin’ Pug’s grit, retaining the former restaurant’s faux brick and exposed concrete walls. What’s new to the space are a welcoming American diner-style neon sign spelling out the bar’s name out front and high-reaching shelves storing a bevy of booze selections. New York-hailing bartender Eric Stephenson brings American-style cocktails to the fore with minimally garnished creations that allow flavors to take the lead. The menu is categorized into four sections based on a drink’s characteristics and flavor profile—sour, carbonated tropical and aromatized (cocktails that have been injected with aromatized wine like vermouth)—and revolves around lesser-known, forgotten classics as well as some modern and regional numbers (Penicillin and Malaysia’s Jungle Bird, for example). Rare tipples include the spirits-forward Yacht Club, slightly adapted from David Embury’s original recipe that combines Diplomatico aged rum, house-blended vermouth (a mix of sherry-based and cla

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
ABar & ABar Rooftop
Bars

ABar & ABar Rooftop

Posh hotel bars that serve great cocktails are, in most cases, rare in Bangkok. (We usually encounter juice-heavy numbers that skimp on booze). But new waves of establishments, including Bangkok Marriott Marquis Queen’s Park, are doing their best to change this situation. Launched alongside the highly anticipated Akira Back restaurant, ABar impressively combines style with substance by pulling off well-rounded libations in two distinct venues: a Victorian-themed drinking palace and a rooftop drinking space up above. Upon entering the bar, your eyes are met with awe-inspiring, moodily lit interiors that make the most of dark wood, black marble and brass details to pay tribute to Victorian London aesthetics and gritty retro-Manhattan elements. (The whole thing looks like something straight out of the film Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.) The outdoor terrace, fitted with apothecary-like cabinets, provide an area for puffing on vintage cigars while looking out to Sukhumvit’s glittering skyscrapers. The bar is helmed by Rojanat Chareonsri, who honed his skills at Nopa Kitchen + Bar in Washington DC and Fillets in Bangkok. The cocktails put the focus on premium dark spirits, so expect whiskey, rum and cognac to make their way into your drink (though we also noticed a couple of gin-based items). Study in Stone is a sour with Nusa Cana rum, sherry cream, citrus oleo saccharum (macerated lemon oil) and lemon (B415). Another offering, The Oxford, smartly reinvents the class

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Ba Hao
Bars

Ba Hao

Bangkok has recently been seeing the mushrooming of Orient-inspired bars across the city. But while most of these joints can boast of amazing interiors, there’s a noticeable lack of decent bar chow coming from their kitchens. And this is where Ba Hao, Soi Nana’s newest Chinese-themed watering hole, pleads a difference. Ba Hao, which means “number eight” in Chinese (eight is considered a lucky number in Chinese culture), spreads over four floors that includes a cocktail bar as well as a small hotel. On the ground floor, a blinking neon-lit logo radiates a red glow that’s evocative of the lights and gritty feel of Shanghai’s red-light district. Home-style Chinese furniture, however, takes away any brothel notions by injecting the intimate vibe of an old-school coffee house. The second floor is a living room/lobby for guests checking into the hotel rooms on the third and fourth floors. One of Ba Hao’s owners, Tikhamporn Chuenkittivoravat, is equipped with culinary training from Mandarin Oriental Bangkok and claims a kitchen stint at The China House, the hotel’s swanky dimsum outpost. She’s helped put together a relatively small but well-curated food menu featuring Chinese-style street eats that are bold in flavor and meant to be paired with booze. Start out with the cold savory-sweet tofu (B158) that’s immersed in a soup of herbal soy sauce, hoisin, and spicy sesame oil. The duck dumplings (B218) are fulfilling little pockets filled with shredded duck and served with a gingery

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars