Things to do in Bangkok today

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Find the best things to do from the daytime to the nighttime in Bangkok with our events calendar of 2017’s coolest events, including parties, concerts, films and art exhibits.

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Movies, Biopic

McQueen

A personal look at the extraordinary life, career and artistry of Alexander McQueen. Through exclusive interviews with his closest friends and family, recovered archives, exquisite visuals and music, McQueen is an authentic celebration and thrilling portrait of an inspired yet tortured fashion visionary.

O Mistério da Casa do Relógio
©DR
Movies, Drama

The House With A Clock In Its Walls: The IMAX 2D Experience

In the tradition of Amblin classics where fantastical events occur in the most unexpected places, Jack Black and two-time Academy Award® winner Cate Blanchett star in THE HOUSE WITH A CLOCK IN ITS WALLS, from Amblin Entertainment. The magical adventure tells the spine-tingling tale of 10-year-old Lewis (Owen Vaccaro) who goes to live with his uncle in a creaky old house with a mysterious tick-tocking heart. But his new town's sleepy façade jolts to life with a secret world of warlocks and witches when Lewis accidentally awakens the dead.

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Photo: Kimberley French
Movies, Action and adventure

The Predator

Shane Black, co-writer and director of the rebooted The Predator, appeared in the 1987 original as dead meat: the kind of wise-cracking character that gets killed off early. (He was just a hot-shit script seller at that point, thrilled to be included in some primo Arnold Schwarzenegger dumb.) As satisfying as it’s been to see Black evolve into a distinctive, banter-friendly voice—The Nice Guys is a recent example—his Predator is exactly the sort of flick he would have made 30 years ago when he played that gangly supporting clown. It’s aggressively pacey, overloaded with smug one-liners, gore-laden and unlikely to have much of a future. Today’s run through the jungle doesn’t include Ah-nold or, indeed, anyone to gaze with bewilderment at a dreadlocked alien with a cloaking device. But it does feature the intriguingly hard-edged Olivia Munn as a biologist who’s called into a secret lab to do some explaining. (Munn has a variation on the first movie’s sole memorable line, but she swaps out “ugly” for “beautiful.”) Also on hand for combat with the green-blooded invaders (there’s more than one this time) are a wry ex-Army Ranger (Boyd Holbrook), a Con Air–chatty busload of military nuts (including Keegan-Michael Key and Moonlight's Trevante Rhodes) and an autistic child (Room’s Jacob Tremblay). Were it not for the hard-R violence and a generous amount of computerized splatter, The Predator would play like a slightly naughtier Independence Day or Armageddon, sci-fi movies that ha

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Alfa, película sobre un humano y su amigo lobo
Foto: Cortesía de la producción
Movies, Action and adventure

Alpha

It may surprise you to learn that the denizens of “Europe, 20,000 years ago”—as the prehistoric adventure Alpha situates us—rocked some beautifully tailored fur-lined parkas and cozy boots that look a lot like Uggs. Evidently, facts aren’t terribly important here (even the movie’s title comes from a civilization that’s still millennia away), but if you can get past that, there’s a moderately gripping tale of survival and natural kinship to be had, one in the long-forgotten vein of 1983’s Never Cry Wolf. Teenage Keda (The Road’s Kodi Smit-McPhee, maturing into a forceful silent presence) has a stern but loving father to impress: Hunting the Great Beast is a rite of passage that’s arrived for him. But after Keda is flung off a high ledge by a charging buffalo, his tribe assumes the worst. The kid survives the ordeal, though, and, left alone in the wild, comes to befriend a relatively sweet-natured wolf that he muzzles and nurses back to health—a first for interspecies relations, it’s implied. The film works best during its (too-brief) getting-to-know-you section, which balances humor against snarly danger. Visualized by director Albert Hughes in an impressive large-frame format, Alpha makes the most of gorgeous British Columbia locations when it’s not undercutting them with its slight overuse of CGI. Perhaps the target audience—thoughtful children (and parents who remember being same)—won’t mind the occasional slickness, especially when it comes in the service of a story with

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Movies, Documentary

Ryuichi Sakamoto: Coda

One of the most important artists of our era, Ryuichi Sakamoto has had a prolific career spanning over four decades. From techno-pop stardom to Oscar-winning film composer, the evolution of his music has coincided with his life journeys. Following Fukushima, Sakamoto became an iconic figure in Japan's social movement against nuclear power. As Sakamoto returns to music following a cancer diagnosis, his haunting awareness of life crises leads to a resounding new masterpiece. RYUICHI SAKAMOTO: CODA is an intimate portrait of both the artist and the man.

Photo: Peter Iovino
Movies, Thriller

A Simple Favor

Sharper than your everyday mean girl since the beginning of her career, Blake Lively has always been capable of more than her opportunities have allowed her, while Anna Kendrick, a chipper “perfect” thing in movie after movie, has been overrated. So it’s gratifying to see them both earning their keep in director Paul Feig’s borderline-nutso crime comedy, one that won’t be confused for a new Gone Girl. But even second-rate trashy turnarounds are worth savoring. A Simple Favor opens in Kendrick’s kitchen: Her Stephanie Smothers (thank you, originating novelist Darcey Bell), a single suburban mom who regularly vlogs to a small audience of likeminded neurotics, has everything under control, yet she’s rattled by the disappearance of her friend, Emily (Lively). In flashbacks, we see that Emily, an acquaintance made while picking up their children at school, is an entirely different species: a Martini-drinking, power-suit-wearing toughie who’s married to Sean (Crazy Rich Asians’ Henry Golding), an unfairly handsome and successful writer. You wait for the two women to connect across the chasm of Emily’s sleekly designed living room; their attraction—nuanced, brainy and one you wish would go to the obvious place—is what makes the film such an identifiable product of the director of Bridesmaids and the all-female Ghostbusters. Stephanie becomes an amateur sleuth bent on hunting down her gal pal’s whereabouts or, barring that, sliding into her walk-in closet and marital bed. Once A Si

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Movies, Horror

Mara

From a producer of Paranormal Activity and Insidious comes this shock-filled descent into fear. After a man is seemingly strangled in his bed, criminal psychologist Kate Fuller (Olga Kurylenko) interviews the sole witness, the victim's eight-year-old daughter, Sophie. When asked to identify the killer, Sophie says, "Mara". As Kate digs into the case, she unearths a community of people who claim to be tormented by a shadowy menace, a centuries-old demon who kills her victims as they sleep.

La monja, película de terror con Damian Bichir
Foto: Cortesía de la producción
Movies, Horror

The Nun

All five of the movies in the extended Conjuring universe have been period pieces, but The Nun is the first one that—charmingly—feels like it was actually made in a bygone decade. Set in 1952, it’s an atmosphere-drenched salute to the European horror films of the 1960s and ’70s that had characters skulking around ancient catacombs amid profaned religious iconography. There are creepy crypts aplenty and a graveyard with bell-equipped coffins just in case anyone gets buried alive (alas, the transgressive sexuality of the era’s more extreme nunsploitation flicks is off the table). Soulful-eyed Taissa Farmiga is perfectly cast (though the film doesn’t acknowledge her sisterly connection to Conjuring vet Vera) as a young novitiate tasked by the Vatican to join a priest (Demián Bichir) on a fact-finding trip to a remote Romanian abbey. One of the clergywomen there has committed suicide, and the duo is joined in its investigation by a French-Canadian villager (Jonas Bloquet) who discovered the corpse and is handy for comic relief. Supernatural evil is afoot and director Corin Hardy musters effective heebie-jeebies from shadowy figures lurking on the edges of the frame. In the absence of much plot or character complexity in the script by Gary Dauberman (It and the Annabelle films), Hardy revels in the opportunity to tell the story as a series of eerie set pieces. Until a computer-enhanced finale somewhat deflates things, he wrings chills from carefully crafted cinematography and pr

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