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The best attractions in Ukrainian Village

Ukrainian Village is a neighborhood that's full of history. Scope out with the best things to do in the area.

Ukrainian Village
Photograph: Adam Jones/Wikimedia Commons
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When you've run out of things to do and see at the best Chicago museums, try heading to the Ukrainian Village neighborhood. "Ukie Village," as it's called by some Chicago residents, is chock-full of some of the best Chicago restaurants, as well as a hefty helping of Ukrainian, Polish and Eastern European culture. If you're looking to make the most of your time, go for a stroll along the neighborhood's busy borders, where the best attractions can be found.

RECOMMENDED: Our complete guide to Ukrainian Village and Noble Square

Best Ukrainian Village attractions

Polish Museum of America
Photograph: CC/Wikimedia Commons
Museums, Art and design

Polish Museum of America

icon-location-pin River West/West Town

Get a dose of Polish history and culture at an institution dedicated to one of Chicago's most celebrated and predominant nationalities. The museum has permanent and rotating art exhibits, lectures by Polish arts and cultural figures, a set of archives and a library.

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Museums, History

Ukrainian National Museum

icon-location-pin River West/West Town

The Ukrainian National Museum plays host to a variety of cultural events and activities, including exhibits that focus on heritage artifacts, paintings, the country's involvement in World War I and pysanky, or ornate Ukrainian Easter eggs. The on-site library houses over 16,000 books and periodicals as well as a document archive that keeps track of Chicago's own Ukrainian community.

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Museums, Art and design

Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art

icon-location-pin Ukrainian Village

The Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art contains one of the largest collections of abstract and minimalist artwork made by Ukrainian-Americans during the 1950s, 60s and 70s in the world. The museum ensures variety in its collection by requiring most exhibiting artists to donate one piece of work to the museum's permanent collection.

RootsCulture.Venue.jpg
Photograph: Martha Williams
Art, Arts centers

Roots & Culture Contemporary Art Center

icon-location-pin River West/West Town

Art exhibits typically change every month at Roots & Culture—which means you can keep coming back. The exhibits focus almost exclusively on emerging artists from the local Chicago scene.

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Chopin Theatre
Photograph: Katie Kullen
Theater

Chopin Theatre

icon-location-pin River West/West Town

One of the more creative storefront theaters in Chicago is the Chopin. Located on the border between Wicker Park and Ukrainian Village, the theater reflects its demographic by showcasing performances geared toward the young, and occasionally hosting visiting European theater companies. Some of Chicago's most-talented rising theater companies such as the Hypocrites and the House Theatre of Chicago are regulars on the stage.

Vittum Theater
Photograph: Facebook/Vittum Theater
Theater, Performing arts space

Vittum Theater

icon-location-pin River West/West Town

Built in 1998, the 299-seat Vittum Theater is the home of the local theater company Adventure Stage Chicago, and is run by the Northwestern Settlement, a community organization with various philanthropic programs and efforts in the West Town community area.

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Art, Galleries

Vertical Gallery

icon-location-pin Ukrainian Village

The art at Vertical Gallery focuses exclusively on contemporary art that occurs in an urban setting and/or is influenced by street art, city environments and pop culture. See work by artists from Chicago, working nationally and internationally abroad.

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Photograph: Tristan Zeier
Art, Galleries

Corbett vs. Dempsey

icon-location-pin East Village

Corbett vs. Dempsey packs the varied interests of its owners all into one exhibition space. Founded by John Corbett and Jim Dempsey in 2004, the gallery on the third-floor of the Dusty Groove building explores the art landscape to find pieces and talent that are overlooked or lies undiscovered. Expect themes related to film, jazz and American Modernism.

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