Get us in your inbox

Talk to the Chef Knives
Image: Shutterstock / Time Out

The 15 best kitchen knives, according to chefs

Upgrade your kitchen gear with these chef-approved blades

Morgan Olsen
Written by
Morgan Olsen
Advertising

If you can upgrade just one piece of kitchen equipment, most pros will tell you to invest in a good knife. The best kitchen knives on the market can make all the difference, allowing you to prep faster and more precisely. But where to start? To help you get slicing and dicing faster, we consulted some of the world's best chefs to find out what knives they use at home. They recommended a boatload of beautiful everyday blades that work for all kinds of kitchen tasks – from slicing meat and dicing veggies to crushing garlic and filleting fish. Plus, you might find something you never knew you needed, like a cleaver (it's not as scary as it sounds, we promise). Take a closer look at the best kitchen knives chefs can't live without when they're cooking at home.

Craving more insider insight from the world's best chefs? You're in the right place. Talk to the Chef! is a weekly food series that will tap into the minds of culinary leaders around the globe. The conversation changes just as often, and we'll chat with chefs about everything from podcasts and kitchen equipment to travel and trends.

The best kitchen knives

Advertising

“Takamura’s high-end knives are truly out of this world. The sharpness of the Octagon and Suminagashi ranges will blow your mind. And the damascus finish is one of the most beautiful I’ve ever seen. Takamura also produces a range of everyday knives at more affordable prices.” —Agustin Ferrando Balbi, chef-founder of Andō in Hong Kong

 

Advertising

“I’ve had my home knife for 15 years now, but it did start with me in the professional kitchen as back then I would never be at home to cook as we worked crazy long hours. It is a brand from the Japanese knife company in London and it’s a super knife that has kept its edge for all of this time and was great value.” —Nick Alvis, chef and co-founder of Nick & Scott restaurant group and folly by Nick & Scott at Time Out Market in Dubai

Advertising

“If you are in America, order a custom cleaver from Bob Kramer, he is the king of knives. Make it nice and heavy so it gets through raw meat and bone but sharp enough to cut wafer thin vegetables. The side also has an important use: It will pound garlic, crack eggs, pound cumin seeds and lift everything off the board like a scoop. That reminds me, you always need a board! Buy the best you can afford and look after it.” —Bin Li, chef of Murger Han restaurants in London

Simple steel knife

“I have bought knives from Masamoto Tsukiji Market nearly every time I visit Tokyo. The one I use most often is a simple steel knife that can carry most prep works apart from bone cutting. It’s lightweight, thin blade and sharpens easily.” —Erchen Chang, owner of Bao in London

Advertising

“This was the first knife I got as a professional cook after reading about it in Cook’s Illustrated. It’s taken quite a beating over the years, but it’s still a solid and comfortable knife. I take care of it, and it takes care of me. The nostalgia is gratifying, and it still does a really good job 12 years later.” —Luciana Giangrandi and Alex Meyer, chefs and co-owners of Boia De in Miami

Advertising

“I purchased [this knife] with versatility in mind. I needed a knife that can be easily used for an at-home dinner service as well as for deboning poultry, filleting small fish and slicing tomatoes. The blade doesn’t oxidize as it is made with stainless steel, it is well-balanced in weight and the handle is ambidextrous and beautifully constructed with red wine-tinted wood composite called pakka. I rely on this knife for everyday use.” —Chanthy Yen, founder of Touk and chef of Parliament Pub & Parlour in Montreal

Advertising

“I’m a fan of what Clement Knives are doing. They’re unique blades crafted from recycled metal and plastic so they help the climate-conscience as well as performing in the kitchen. They’re made in small batches. It’s first-come first-served and they sell out fast.” James Cochran, chef-owner of 12:51 by Chef James Cochran in London

Advertising

More Talk to the Chef!

Advertising
Recommended

    More on Talk to the Chef

      You may also like
        Advertising