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Top five people who ruin the beach
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Top five people who ruin the beach

1. The Speedo Sporter   There's always that one banana hammock enthusiast who feels the need to let it al(most) hang loose at the beach. If he was the perfectly sculpted Israeli army brat type, that would be one thing, but there are parameters to the "beach balls" cult: older, hairy, white male, over the age of 50, not afraid to be loud and proud in an effort to attract other speedo sporters – aka the ideal Tinder profile.   2. The Day Drinker   Sure, Happy Hour is great in Tel Aviv. "But who decided we could only be happy for an hour? It's the weekend, the sun is shining, and the day is young, why not crack some beers on the beach, right now?" These are the thoughts that run through the Day Drinker's (at-the-time) sober mind, until those first two 10% Slowbrews kick in and the gloves (or in this case flip-flops) come off. As they drunkenly curse the sand, the tourists, and the disappearing garbage bin they swear someone removed as a practical joke just as they felt the vomit coming up, their friends head for sunset patio drinks. Not such a happy hour after all, huh?   3. The Perspirer   Everyone has a "perspiry date": that carefully calculated window of opportunity between the time of peak sweatiness and deodorant expiration. There's always that one extra sweaty, extra stanky friend who missed the memo, or maybe they just have a permanently blocked nose. Come on guy, reapply! Sometimes, settling for that nauseating AXE body spray cloud that encapsulates every teena

The 16 unwritten rules of biking in Tel Aviv...
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The 16 unwritten rules of biking in Tel Aviv...

...well, technically there are no rules. BUT, rather than being a cycling cynic, as both an optimist and an avid Tel Aviv biker, I would like to share my two(-wheel) cents with those squeaky clean new bike-owners ready to hit the road (and possibly a pedestrian or two).   1. Bike lanes are a suggestion more than anything.   © Shutterstock           2. Streets and sidewalks are fair game - the trick is to alternate between the two as you see fit.   3. Invest in a kryptonite lock, you won't regret it.   4. If you're still nervous, lock it in front of the nearest 24/7 AM:PM - people are afraid to steal bikes in broad daylight, even if it's emulated by the bright grocery store lights.   5. Helmets? What are those?   6. Pay no heed to road signs.   7. Don't play chicken with the pigeons...they'll win.   8. If you can dodge traffic, you can dodge a ball.   via GIPHY   9. Riding head first into ongoing one-way traffic is permitted.   10. Ignore the 5-10 average honks you'll receive on any given day.   11. If you're a Florentin-dwelling hipster, it's the unofficial law to own a bike - for form over function.   12. Learn to outrun the bus.   13. Treat every traffic light like a stop sign, if anything.   14. There's a reason Tel-O-Funs have a 30-minute cap - DON'T attempt to take one on a 30 km off-road ride.   © Shutterstock           15. If you live on the fifth floor of a walk-up, it's better to haul it up those stair

The 21 toughest things about being single in Tel Aviv
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The 21 toughest things about being single in Tel Aviv

As we learnt from our speed dating article, being single ain’t all sunshine and lollypops (or free meals and multiple orgasms to be politically correct). It’s a mad world out there, especially for those lone wanderers still looking for Mr. Right (or as the wise Carrie Bradshaw once put it: Mr. Big). Here are a handful of reasons why it sucks to be single in the White City.   1. A sloppy one-night stand with the cute boy from Jerusalem turns into a weekend-long event (since buses don’t run on Shabbat and he’d rather “spend time with you” than brave a sweaty, over-stuffed sherut ride back).   2. The third date qualifies as an appropriate time to meet your date’s parents over a family Shabbat dinner (second if they really like you).   3. Hearing about the incredible apartment your married friends are looking at in the city center — one they can actually afford because they're splitting rent — while you’re paying double for a studio in HaKerem. You thought rent was expensive in Manhattan?   4. Because Tel Aviv is small, you keep bumping into your exes, only to find out that each of them has recently gotten engaged. There’s a reason you blocked them all on Facebook.   5. There is always some beautiful bride-and-groom combination taking wedding photos on the beach at sunset. All you want to do is go for an evening run without being reminded of just how dreadfully single you are.   © Shutterstock   6. Netflix recently got a new feature that not only suggests movies

Stay Cool! 17 ways to survive the summer heat without AC
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Stay Cool! 17 ways to survive the summer heat without AC

It's Israel. It's summer. It's hot. You're bothered. Sometimes you have to get a little creative when the heat feels unbearable and your Air-Con is broken. We all know it takes the handyman at least a week (if not two) in Israel to tend to these matters so in the meantime, here are a few tips on how to make it through July alive without an AC unit.   1. Go on a strict popsicle-only diet. 2. Linger by the AM:PM freezer section where all the 'cool kids' hang. 3. Casually slow your pace down when passing those automatic sliding doors that shove their shops' overly air conditioned atmosphere in your face.   4. Fall in love (or at least have a string of one-night stands) with someone who has an air conditioned apartment...on the down side, despite AC, you run the risk of your bodies sticking together in hot weather. 5. Buy a fan attachment for your child's stroller, wait for them to fall asleep, then turn it so that the air blows in your direction.   6. Stick your PJs in the freezer ten minutes or so before bed. It sounds crazy, but it works. 7. Forget about sticking it to the dood. Take cold power showers to get your cold blood pumping. 8. Study ice cream parlor rush hours and distinguish the best times to beat the Tamara traffic. 9. Become a night owl. Everything's cooler when the sun's not around. 10. Lie spread eagle on your cold ceramic floor. A 1:1 skin-to-cold-tile ratio i

7 tips to enjoy Tel Aviv like a local
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7 tips to enjoy Tel Aviv like a local

Eat an Israeli breakfastStart your Tel Aviv day at Manta Ray, a stone’s throw from the sea. Locals visit for the stellar house-made meze—mosaics of Israeli salads plus fresh seafood. 7 Kolfman St (+972-3-517-4773, mantaray.co.il)     Manta Ray© Avi Ganor      Find the best hummus Ok, we found it for you. Abu Hassan wins our vote for the best hummus in town— super-creamy and as authentic as it gets. By 3pm, everything is gone—all gone. 1 Ha-Dolfin St, Jaffa     Abu Hassan © PR             Sit in a fabulous café Lounging in cafés is part of the Tel Aviv scene, and Rothschild 12 masters the combination of cozy and hip. Ideal for observing the colorful characters of the city. 12 Rothschild Blvd (+972-3-510- 6430)   Anatoli Michaelo            Party...hard Tel Aviv's hot spot Kuli Alma is so much more than a night club or a bar. A hub for music, food, art and culture, this all encompassing experience features DJs pumping out electric beats, house, hiphop and live musical acts. 10 Mikveh Israel St (+972-3-656- 5155, kulialma.com)     Kuli Alma© Ben Palhov               Play matkot This trendy paddleball game has been the country’s quintessential beach pastime since the 1920s. Give it a shot at one of the beautiful Tel Aviv Beaches.     Playing Matkot© Sutterstock         Drink Arak Sip this popular anise flavored drink at Haminzr bar, just off the Carmel market. Known for its chill vibe and energy, Haminzar is the perfe

14 questions your parents will ask when they visit Israel from abroad
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14 questions your parents will ask when they visit Israel from abroad

That spit-fire round of ridiculous questions your parents will ask the minute they touch down on arid lands is inevitable. Why not get ahead of the game and pre-prepare your answers to these questions your mother and father will surely ask at some point during their visit to Israel.   1. Is this water drinkable?   2. Where's the rest of the apartment?   3. Do you keep any cleaning products? All I see here are these giant wipes.   4. How much should I tip?   5. Why don't they give us napkins?   6. What's with all the cats? And graffiti?   7. Why does everything taste like black licorice?     8. What's a freier?   9. Are there actual grocery stores too?   10. Where's the green line?   11. Why are they honking at me?   12. How come no one is lining up?   13. Do I need to cover my knees?   14. Is anything open on

Top five excuses for being late
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Top five excuses for being late

1. 'Waze misjudged the traffic' You can't go boasting to all of your North American friends about how much better the Israel GPS app is than their old school Google Maps app, then turn on it at the expense of your dignity. Even the world's largest community based traffic and navigation app has its days. "Stupid smart phone! I thought you were supposed to be...well...smart!"   2. 'Somebody stole my bike' It is a rite of passage to have at least one bike stolen when living in Tel Aviv, the unofficial cycling capital of the Middle East (to be fair, there isn't much competition for the title with all the sand and what not). A few empathetic looks are expected, perhaps even a pat on the back or an uncomfortable hug...but those sympathetic sentiments will fade when the supposedly 'stolen' bike magically reappears later that day.   3. 'I blame Taglit' There's a lot we can blame on the manmade traffic jams that start in May and last until July (sometimes August if you count the token few who extend their trip, then link arms with others of their kind and multiply to create the ultimate antagonist, or as Mario would call him, "Birthright Bowser"). But let's be honest, how much time does weaving through a pack of stray cats struggling to be herded actually add to the saga? 5 minutes? Maybe less? Just steer clear of the bright red lanyards and Jewish American Princesses and you'll be fine.   4. 'The bus never came' (or was 'too full') Holding public transportation responsible

Top five people you’ll meet on an El Al flight
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Top five people you’ll meet on an El Al flight

1. The religious man What seems like merely an aircraft for some, is actually a living room, kitchen, and shul for these passengers. The black hats and religious garb are telltale signs of the flight experience to come – complete with discussions about life in an ever-changing Williamsburg and periodic congregations in the rear for prayers (God does not always coordinate with the FASTEN YOUR SEAT BELT sign). Should religious controversy arise, remember: why would it be reasonable to expect Israel’s national airline to be any more capable of dealing with theological disputes than the country itself? After all, “it’s not just an airline, it’s Israel!” 2. The overly concerned traveler While everyone around them is trying to stuff a slightly oversized carry-on into the slightly undersized overhead compartment or herd their many children into seats, this person has become a self proclaimed Mossad agent. Last night, they dove deep into the recesses of the internet, and in short, things are not looking good. The four rounds of security did little-to-nothing to assuage their anxiety and clearly, no one can be trusted. The person with the blood shot eyes and single carry on is probably just exhausted from international travel, right? Maybe I should play it safe and alert a flight attendant just in case. 3. The Birthright bunch Regardless of where you are seated, you’ll hear this group be