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Photograph: Raku

The best Japanese restaurants in Las Vegas

Wake up your taste buds with delectable omakase, ramen, gyoza and more at the best Japanese restaurants in Las Vegas

Written by
Sarah Feldberg
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Finding the best Japanese restaurants in Las Vegas is easier than you might think. At one point, Japanese food was synonymous with mass-produced sushi, reduced to safe translations of spicy tuna and California rolls. Today, that narrow interpretation of Japanese cuisine has exploded into a broad spectrum of flavors and styles, from izakaya pub fare to steaming bowls of ramen to proteins lightly charred over a fiery robata grill. Las Vegas has a wealth of Japanese restaurants that offer both traditional and modern takes on sushi, yakitori, udon and more.

Whether frolicking around the Strip or spending the day exploring the best things to do in Vegas, you’ll want to add these Japanese restaurants to your must-eat-here list. Get your fill of authentic sashimi, gyoza, A5 wagyu and even yellowtail “pastrami.” Explore sleek, modern, interpretations of Japanese small plates at a pricey, trendy restaurant, or hit up a casual izakaya for a taste of more traditional fare.

A serious, thoughtful feast at one of the Japanese-accented dining dens provides a calming alternative to a raucous night at one of the best bars and clubs in Sin City. For other top-notch regional Asian fare, check out the best Thai restaurants in Las Vegas or the best Chinese restaurants Las Vegas.

RECOMMENDED: The best restaurants in Las Vegas

Best Japanese restaurants in Las Vegas

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  • price 3 of 4

Chef Kaoru Azeuchi is quietly cooking some of the best Japanese food—scratch that, best food—in Las Vegas. Here, the veteran chef, who once served the island’s emperor, focuses on kaiseki dining, a Japanese tradition obsessed with seasonality where every bite of the ten-dish menu is inherently of the moment, made with ingredients only currently available. It’s a labor-intensive style of cooking that requires reservations at least three days in advance, but diners reap the rewards, embarking on an edible journey that’s fantastic and fleeting, a culinary revelation that changes with every visit.

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • West of the Strip
  • price 2 of 4

This once under-the-radar Chinatown restaurant is hardly a secret anymore, but that hasn’t diminished its culinary prowess. Ten years after chef/owner Mitsuo Endo began serving silky homemade tofu and robata-grilled beef tendon to in-the-know locals and off-duty chefs, the six-time James Beard semifinalist izakaya is still just as relevant. And Raku stays open till 3am six nights a week, making it one of the city’s best destinations for a late-night bite.

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  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • price 4 of 4

If Jiro Dreams of Sushi is your favorite documentary, Yui Edomae Sushi might be your favorite restaurant. Here, the role of Jiro is played by chef Gen Mizoguchi, a master of fish and rice who helped introduce Las Vegas to traditional edomae sushi as the chef of a just-opened Kabuto. At Yui, Mizoguchi plays chef and choreographer to a brilliant parade of bites that progress over the course of an omakase tasting, from pickled items to grilled plates to gorgeously subtle sashimi and nigiri using fish you’ve never heard of before, for a meal you’ll never forget.

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • West of the Strip
  • price 3 of 4

There are no rolls on the menu at this Chinatown sushi restaurant. No gyoza, no seaweed salad and—heaven forbid!—no spicy mayo. Kabuto serves omakase symphonies—multi-course tasting menus focused around lush slabs of super-fresh fish laid across perfectly seasoned sushi rice with perhaps a dab of soy here and there. That simplicity lets the ingredients sing and has earned the restaurant due acclaim. Reserve a seat at the counter and watch the chefs create your meal with a grace and precision that resembles performance art.

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  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Restaurants
  • price 4 of 4
This is our world now. A world where Vegas diners hankering for highly choreographed omakase tastings don’t have a single option but multiple restaurants to choose from, including this recent arrival adjacent to Yummy Sushi. While Kabuto and Yui embody traditional edomae experiences, at Kame things feel looser and more creative. There’s still fantastic seafood—Hokkaido hairy crabs, giant clams and cod sperm sac—but the chefs have a little more fun with their dishes, serving sea urchin in nori tacos and lobster claws in a bath of uni Sauvignon Blanc sauce. Those 16-ish courses don’t come cheap, however. Expect to spend at least $165 per person for this two-hour culinary epic.
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  • price 3 of 4

Las Vegas waited years for the Iron Chef to open a restaurant on the Strip, and when Morimoto arrived at MGM Grand in 2016, he didn’t disappoint. Here, the ponytailed chef flexes multiple culinary muscles from sushi and steak to creative reinterpretations of Japanese classics, like tuna tartare arranged as an artist’s palette and gently smoked yellowtail “pastrami” with a dollop of creme fraiche. Pair your meal with something from the sake list or perhaps a wagyu Manhattan, made with—you guessed it—beef-infused whiskey.

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  • Restaurants
  • The Strip
  • price 3 of 4

Iconic chef Nobu Matsuhisa has long influenced Las Vegas through his Hard Rock Hotel restaurant, which produced some of the city’s top Japanese cooks. But today the best taste of Nobu is at Caesars Palace, where this expansive eatery attached to the first-ever Nobu Hotel delivers a wide array of Japanese fare. Supplement the signature miso black cod with a few pieces of sushi, rock shrimp tempura and perhaps an order of wagyu gyoza. The Nobu experience may no longer be revolutionary, but it’s reliably delicious.

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • price 4 of 4

Hello, gorgeous. This jewel of a restaurant tucked into the Wynn is what happens when the same amount of consideration is given to both design and food. Here, guests dine alongside Japanese gardens complete with tranquil koi pond and a 90-foot waterfall. And that dramatic scenery is a fitting backdrop for chef Devin Hashimoto’s menu, which elevates the usual suspects to match the surroundings. That means Jidori chicken is cooked with black truffle teriyaki, beef tataki is made with prime NY strip and Mizumi is the perfect splurge for a Vegas vacation.

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  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • price 3 of 4

Where Kabuto and Yui approach sushi with almost religious reference, at KUMI has a little more fun with the raw fish-and-rice format. Try the Pop Rockin’ roll with spicy tuna, crab, salmon avocado and Pop Rocks or a crispy pork belly roll with Brussels sprouts coleslaw. The rest of the menu is equally playful, pairing Japanese eggplant with miso and mozzarella and yuzu kosho scallops with pancetta and truffle Parmesan.

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  • price 3 of 4

Modern Japanese restaurants are hardly novel on the Strip (see: Mizumi, Kumi, Nobu, Morimoto), so when London-based Zuma announced an outpost inside the Cosmopolitan, it hardly registered as a game-changer. But if Zuma hasn’t redefined the category, it’s certainly established a niche within it, thanks to its elegant, wood-infused environment and its broad menu of well-crafted bites, from sea bass with yuzu, truffle and salmon roe to tempura lobster and robata-grilled pork ribs. Bring a few friends, order together and taste as much as you can.

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  • Restaurants
  • price 2 of 4

Some of the city’s best sushi chefs have come through the Nobu kitchen and Nakano Hiromi, who helms this westside favorite, is no exception. Along with a full menu of cooked items and 24 special maki rolls, he serves beautifully modern sushi and sashimi, pairing raw fish with a wide variety of ingredients and flavors. Think: sea bream with finger lime, shiso, white balsamic and truffle oil or salmon with onion, capers, bonito flakes and spicy ponzu sauce.

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  • price 1 of 4

This is not a shrine to the wonders of seasonal cooking or the bounty of oceanic edibles off the coast of Japan. This is an izakaya, a Japanese gastropub where small plates of sashimi and grilled skewers are washed down with cold beer or sake. Dig into dishes like uni dumplings and egg custard, then drink, peruse the varied menu—and order some more. Enjoying Izakaya Go is simple: Just sample, sip and repeat.  

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The OG of the local ramen scene, this Spring Mountain Road spot helped introduce Las Vegas to the hearty noodle soup long known in the U.S. as a cheap dorm room snack. Monta’s incarnation has little in common with its packaged cousins. The petite eatery specializes in tonkotsu ramen—rich, creamy broth made from pork bones and soy sauce served with thin noodles, roast pork, green onions, bamboo shoots and mushrooms. It’s basically a liquid hug. Start slurping.

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