The best restaurants in Las Vegas

Our guide to the best restaurants in Las Vegas from fine dining on the Strip to top pizza, buffets and beyond

A far cry from the second-rate refueling options of yore, the best restaurants in Las Vegas now rank with the best things to do in Las Vegas of legend, on a level with catching one of the extravagant Las Vegas shows or seeing the top Las Vegas attractions on the Strip. Las Vegas restaurants have been transformed over the two decades since Wolfgang Puck opened his first outpost here in the ’90s. In addition to numerous celebrity-chef establishments, you can gorge on a cornucopia of globe-spanning grub, including superb sushi, authentic Neapolitan pizza and standout Thai food. And those notorious all-you-can-eat buffets in Las Vegas are improving, too—youll even find one on this list. Here are the best restaurants in Las Vegas. Happy eating!

1
Joël Robuchon Restaurant
Restaurants, French
Joël Robuchon Restaurant
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Why go? There simply is no dinner more decadent on the Las Vegas Strip.
Fine dining is alive and very well inside the “mansion,” a fitting nickname for Joël Robuchon’s opulent Michelin three-star restaurant just off the MGM Grand casino floor. A meal here is a once-in-a-lifetime event: The 12-course parade of transcendent French cuisine takes more than three hours and makes ample use of caviar, sea urchin and foie gras.
Price range: blowout.
icon-location-pin The Strip
2
Bazaar Meat by José Andrés
Restaurants, Steakhouse
Bazaar Meat by José Andrés
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Why go? To feast on all forms of meat, from A5 Kobe straight from Japan to Finnish caviar.
According to superstar chef José Andrés, his restaurant at SLS is a “meathouse,” dedicated to celebrating the bounty of the earth. The ingredients are the stars here, but the chefs still have fun showing them off. That means foie gras is offered wrapped in cotton candy and dishes like the classic steak tartare are mixed tableside with plenty of panache.
Price range: blowout.
icon-location-pin The Strip
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3
Raku
Photograph: Courtesy Creative Commons/Flickr/John Joh
Restaurants, Japanese
Raku
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Why go? Japanese charcoal infuses all kinds of skewers with a delicious smokey flavor. 
Set in the back of a Chinatown strip mall, this pristine Japanese robatayaki restaurant has been drawing in-the-know locals, chefs and savvy visitors for years. Chef/owner Mitsuo Endo uses Japanese charcoal to grill up skewers like Kobe beef tendon and bacon-wrapped mushrooms, complementing the robata list with appetizers, noodle soups and daily specials, often featuring fish flown in from Tokyo.
Price range: average.
icon-location-pin West of the Strip
4
Carnevino
Restaurants, Steakhouse
Carnevino
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Why go? For crazy good beef and crazy good wine. 
The name of Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich’s Italian-influenced steakhouse says it all. The wine list leans heavily on Italy, and the menu offers handmade pastas and various crudos, all leading up to some serious meat. The beef is sourced from American farmers and dry-aged off-site until it meets the restaurant’s very high standards.
Price range: pricey. 
icon-location-pin The Strip
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5
Twist by Pierre Gagnaire
Photograph: Courtesy Twist
Restaurants, French
Twist by Pierre Gagnaire
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Why go? Modern French cuisine and stunning views from the 23rd floor of the Mandarin Oriental. 
Twist is breathtaking. There’s the airy dining room, with its glass orb chandeliers and serene decor. And there’s the impeccable food that seems to transport you inside the inventive mind of Michelin-starred chef Pierre Gagnaire. Trying to anticipate how a dish will arrive is a losing game. Best to pick an ingredient that strikes you—say, langoustine or rack of lamb—or opt for one of the tasting menus.
Price range: blowout. 
icon-location-pin The Strip
6
Kabuto Edomae Sushi
Photograph: Courtesy Kabuto Edomae Sushi
Restaurants, Japanese
Kabuto
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Why go? For lush slabs of super-fresh fish laid across perfectly seasoned sushi rice.
There are no rolls on the menu at this Chinatown sushi restaurant. No gyoza, no seaweed salad—just nigiri. That simplicity lets the ingredients sing and has made the restaurant a local star, dubbed one of the 50 best new restaurants in the country by Bon Appetit when it opened in 2012. Reserve a seat at the counter to watch the chefs work with a precision that resembles performance art.
Price range: pricey.
icon-location-pin West of the Strip
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7
Estiatorio Milos
Photograph: Courtesy Estiatorio Milos
Restaurants, Greek
Estiatorio Milos
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Why go? For Greek seaside fare straight from the Mediterranean and Aegean.
When Milos opened in the Cosmopolitan in 2010, it brought something to the Strip we hadn’t even realized was missing. Here, you’ll find meaty octopus with just the right char, gently cured Greek bottarga and freshly flown-in fish cooked whole in a salt crust. Order the “real Greek yogurt” for dessert, which will ruin you for the grocery store stuff. 
Price range: pricey. 
icon-location-pin The Strip
8
Sage
Photograph: Courtesy Sage
Restaurants, American
Sage
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Why go? Exceptional food does not have to be complicated.
Chef Shawn McClain strives for sophisticated simplicity with a farm-to-table menu that includes dishes like slow-cooked short ribs with fennel-potato puree and red wine reduction and roasted halibut with bacon-chili butter and spring vegetables. The result is a memorable meal that satisfies and surprises. For pre- (or post-) dinner cocktails, check out Sage’s 16-strong absinthe menu.
Price range: pricey.
icon-location-pin The Strip
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9
CUT
Restaurants, Steakhouse
Cut
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Why go? This classic steakhouse is a slice above all others. 
Wolfgang Puck, the man responsible for revolutionizing Las Vegas visitors’ eating expectations (with Spago), opened Cut in the Palazzo in 2008. Carnivores are sure to be delighted with the restaurant's long menu of meat, meat and more glorious meat. Go for the 100-percent pure Wagyu rib-eye if you can, but you won’t go wrong with any of the other options.
Price range: blowout.
icon-location-pin The Strip
10
Bardot Brasserie
Photograph: Courtesy Bardot Brasserie
Restaurants, French
Bardot Brasserie
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Why go? This stylish spot has everything you want in a French brasserie. 
Michael Mina's Bardot Brasserie has it all: modern takes on classic dishes, ample wines by the glass and a champagne cart. On weekend mornings, Bardot packs ’em in with its popular brunch, where you can order a variety of croissant Benedicts, brioche French toast with vanilla mascarpone and almond brittle, or the Hunter’s Waffle with duck confit and poached eggs.
Price range: pricey.
icon-location-pin The Strip
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11
Craftsteak
Restaurants, Steakhouse
Craftsteak
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Why go? Tom Colicchio’s quiet invention distinguishes Craftsteak from other casino restaurants. 
Craftsteak's selection of meats (grass-fed veal, lamb shank, filet mignon, braised short ribs) is impressive, but the sides also hold their own. Ingredients come from small family farms and other under-the-radar sources, and you can tell, particularly when it comes to the splurgy Japanese A5 Kobe, which will set you back a cool $290 for the eight-ounce filet.
Price range: blowout. 
icon-location-pin The Strip
12
Sparrow + Wolf’s  Beet and Green Apple Tartare with Cardamom A
Photograph: Courtesy Sparrow + Wolf / Sabin Orr
Restaurants
Sparrow + Wolf
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Why go? Artfully arranged plates of inventive dishes have the whole town buzzing.
Chef-owner Brian Howard opened this Chinatown restaurant in 2017 and diners haven't been able to stop talking about it since. The presentation is almost as interesting as the flavors here, with a starter of fresh seafood, cured meats and terrines arriving in a modern bento box and shared plates like bone marrow–beef cheek dumplings coming covered in foam.
Price range: average.
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13
Carson Kitchen
Photograph: Courtesy Carson Kitchen/Chris Wessling
Restaurants, Gastropubs
Carson Kitchen
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Why go? For creative comfort food and potent cocktails. 
Opened downtown in the midst of the area’s redevelopment, this gastropub signaled a shift in the neighborhood’s dining scene. Finally, there was a place to meet friends for a bite or head on a first date—if, that is, you could get a table. Carson Kitchen is continuously packed with locals who come for the lively vibe and clean-your-plate cooking, including the bacon jam and bourbon fudge brownie.
Price range: average.
14
Lotus of Siam
Photograph: Courtesy Creative Commons/Flickr/John Joh
Restaurants, Thai
Lotus of Siam
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Why go? This acclaimed Thai restaurant is a rare and unexpected treat in an otherwise unprepossessing strip mall.
Saipin Chutima presides over a huge menu (and equally impressive wine list), which can be a little overwhelming on a first visit. Do yourself a favor and try something from the Northern Thai section—we’re partial to the khao soi, or egg noodles in coconut cream curry—and don’t miss the nam kao tod, crispy rice with sour pork sausage, cilantro, chili and lime.
Price range: pricey.
icon-location-pin East of the strip
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15
Bouchon
Restaurants, French
Bouchon
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Why go? For polished French cooking that covers all bases. 
The sole Vegas outpost from chef Thomas Keller, this bright, airy bistro serves everything from steak frites and onion soup to the Grand Plateau, a seafood tower loaded with oysters, shrimp, clams, mussels and crab. Don’t sleep through breakfast: Bouchon is the rare Strip restaurant that serves one during the week, featuring baskets of fresh pastries and the roasted chicken with bacon-chive waffle.
Price range: pricey.
icon-location-pin The Strip
16
Pizza Rock
Photograph: Courtesy Pizza Rock
Restaurants, Pizza
Pizza Rock
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Why go? For the wide variety of pizzas from award-winning chef Tony Gemignani. 
Here, pizzas are listed according to their cooking temperature and type of oven. Purists will want the Margherita Napoletana (baked in a 900-degree wood-fired oven), while more adventurous types might opt for the Cal Italia with gorgonzola, prosciutto and fig preserves (650-degree gas brick oven) or one of the Romana varieties (700-degree electric brick oven)—long, thin pies with three different sets of toppings.
Price range: average.
icon-location-pin Downtown
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17
Bacchanal Buffet
Restaurants, Buffet
Bacchanal Buffet
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Why go? This Vegas buffet is tastier, fresher and more interesting than most. 
Bacchanal is just what its name implies: an overwhelmingly decadent assortment of more than 500 different items daily, many individually plated and some made to order. Whether you’re craving Japanese curry, lump crab avocado toast or fried chicken and waffles, you’ll leave satisfied and—unless you have truly epic willpower—very, very full.
Price range: pricey. 
icon-location-pin The Strip
18
Le Pho
Photograph: Courtesy Le Pho
Restaurants, Vietnamese
Le Pho
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Why go? Fresh Vietnamese cooking at extraordinarily affordable prices.
This relative newcomer to the downtown dining scene has quickly gained fans with its craveable Vietnames dishes. The menu ranges from inventive fusion food like Saigon buffalo chicken wings and pho-dipped brisket banh mi to classics like traditional shrimp and pork spring rolls. 
Price range: bargain.
icon-location-pin Downtown
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19
Restaurants, Latin American
Chica
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Why go? Updated Latin-American dishes in a rustic-chic space.
Chef Lorena Garcia drew inspiration from the traditional cuisines of Venezuela, Peru, Brazil, Mexico and Argentina for Chica's dynamic Latin-American menu. Garcia flips the script on the standard bread basket by serving arepas with nata butter instead. Similarly, the classic quesadilla gets updated with charred mushrooms and blue cheese while Argentinian red shrimp are served with quinoa and Beluga lentils rather than rice and beans.
Price range: pricey.
20
Rivea
Photograph: Pierre Monetta
Restaurants, Contemporary French
Rivea
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Why go? For sweeping views of the Strip and food inspired by the French and Italian riviera.  
With previous locations in London and Saint-Tropez, Alain Ducasse has honed the Rivea concept, namely small plates made for sharing like paccheri pasta with braised short ribs, marinated sea bass with citrus and bright salads punctuated by seafood. Whether you come for dinner or cocktails in the adjacent Skyfall Lounge, it’s worth the trip to the 64th floor to revel in the stunning setting.
Price range: blowout. 
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