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Fashion, style & beauty shops in Mexico City

The 10 best shops in Mexico City
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The 10 best shops in Mexico City

Mexico City was named World Design Capital 2018 by the World Design Organisation, thanks to the creative buzz that’s found across the city. If you’re keen to discover what’s on offer in Mexico City’s best shops, including both local and international options, and want to avoid browsing in the same stores that are found in every shopping centre, this selection is just for you. Here you’ll find luxurious boutiques in Polanco and concept stores in Roma and Condesa, along with smaller places which promote local design and old mansions which are now home to vintage and second-hand clothing. In other words, you’ll find something for every taste, style and budget.

Void
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Void

  Their fascination with decades passed led collectors Olympia de la Macorra and Salvador Sahagún to travel the world in search of pieces that gave life and shape to an idea that has lived for a long time in their minds. The result of their trips to Japan, France, the United States and South Africa is inside an art deco house from the 30s. VOID, a vintage store that offers luxury clothing and accessories with a story. The house is divided into five themed rooms. First, the American-cowboy, a room that protects old wonders in leather and suede, all curated by the owners. A few steps away is the print room: Paul McCartney, Rod Stewart, David Bowie and Mick Jagger greet you from the covers of magazines and diaries of the 60s and 70s like, Creem and Melody Maker. When you climb the stairs, you’ll find a dream come true: a room full of clothes and accessories Chanel and Hermès -  luxury at its best. Here, in the chambers of Coco Chanel, tweed skirts and coats coexist with the iconic Birkin bags and other wonders of the emblematic French label. Across the hall is the room of the rebellious designers, which displays pieces by Pierre Cardin, Louis Vuitton, Balmain, Saint Laurent and Prada. The biggest surprise is the section dedicated to André Courrèges, the creator of the miniskirt (along with Mary Quant) and space age fashion, these retro-futurist garments are extremely difficult to find outside of Paris. There is also room for less famous but equally charming labels such as Ma

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Utilitario Mexicano
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Utilitario Mexicano

Three years ago, Libya Moreno and Enrique Arellano had the idea of ​​creating a space that would represent Mexico, especially the homes and traditional domestic Mexican products. Enter, their shop in the Juarez neighborhood. This spot houses more than 1,500 objects, most of them utensils that fuse the artisanal and industrial. Like, pewter cups, colored spotlights, kitchen utensils, pans, spoons, dishes, bottle openers, as well as cleaning supplies such as buckets, fiber brushes and vinyl aprons. This store also stimulates the Mexican market since all its products are made in small workshops in Mexico City. They also scout the streets of the Historic Center to find products and utensils that fit with the concept of the store. As for the decoration, UM transmits a homey warmth with garland and dim lighting while lining their walls with aluminum jugs and tote bags gives it an authentic feel. UM also sells laika brand notebooks, wrapping paper, rubber bands, pencils, metal rulers, pencil sharpeners and other stationery items. If you ask about the prices, there are accessible items and others not as much, like pewter jugs priced at 480 MXN, pestle & mortars for190 MXN, bottle openers at 60 MXN and even a mural map of Mexico City for 2,500 MXN.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
La Metropolitana
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La Metropolitana

Located between the Juarez neighborhood and the Historic City Center, La Metropolitana is a multidisciplinary space specializing in architecture, interior design, furniture and graphic design. Founders, Luis David Arredondo, Rodrigo Escobedo, Alejandro Gutiérrez and Mauricio Guerrero are graduates of CENTRO and, since 2008, have ran a dynamic creation project focused on design innovation in every expression. This workshop/office/showroom has much of its production line up for sale. You’ll find benches and chairs from the "Union" collection, accessories such as vases and picture frames from distributor New Order, handbags, pencil holders... a tiny universe that ranges from small trinkets to large interior design and architecture projects. Their prices are accessible though, since they depend on the project and the interests of each client: there are items that range from 400 MXN, chairs at 3500 MXN, even armchairs at 8,000 MXN. The best thing is that the service is personalized, so they can also advise you on your purchases. Each of the collections has different creative guidelines, for example: "Union" is mostly furniture and renewed monthly.  The accessories collection, "Lagos del Mundo", is the result of work with craftsman from all over the country which includes candles, candlesticks, cutting boards and more. When restoring and appropriating a complete building where they installed their shop, workshop and offices, they took advantage of the tradesman that surround t

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Stendhal Store
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Stendhal Store

Minimalist, urban and androgynous are the words that best describe this concept store created by sisters Regina and Gladys Vega. Located in the heart of the Polanco neighborhood, this store is not governed by gender or age; everything they sell can be worn by both men and women. Most of the brands are Mexican, like 1/8 Takamura, The Pack, Mancandy, Ocelote and Agüero, and there are some foreign pieces by Jeffrey Campbell, Eleven Paris, Marmanuel and Ready to Die. As the name says, Stendhal is a syndrome; a physical reaction to something beautiful, hence the mantra on the wall: #Enjoythesyndrome, which serves as a reminder to enjoy the small things of life. So much so that the aroma, lighting and even the music are strategically designed to enhance your experience. In terms of prices, Stendhal offers options for all budgets, from 180 MXN pins to bombers that cost 15,000 MXN.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars

Mexico City’s best shops

Lago DF Masaryk
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Lago DF Masaryk

First it was Emilio Castelar, then Virreyes and now Lago DF takes on exclusive Masaryk boulevard in the Polanco neighborhood with its new branch in Mexico City. The Regina Barrios and Alessandro Cerruti (founders of Caravana Americana) project is growing at an immense rate and with it, doors are opening for a large number of Latin American designers to have a presence in Mexican luxury sector. Upon entering, you’ll realize that this is the home of the most exclusive domestic and international brands around. There are pieces by Carla Fernández, 1/8 Takamura, Simple by Trista, Cynthia Butenkeppler and Zii Ropa. The boutique only has five international brands. But, the one that stole our hearts - and attention - is Metier Crafts, an Ecuadorian company that produces the famous Panama hats. Lago DF also has a space dedicated to jewelry, shoes, handbags and accessories with pieces by Ishi, Caralarga, Colorindio, Peca and Candor.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Cynthia Buttenklepper
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Cynthia Buttenklepper

Visiting Cynthia’s showroom is to submerge yourself in her own universe. It’s a place that stands out like any Pinterest board; the decorations with dogs included, couples well with Buttkenklepper’s minimalist style. At one side, you’ll see the workshop where they design and manufacture each piece. Here, you will find pieces of the latest collections. Regularly, Cynthia attends the showroom, so in addition to chatting with her, you an also make your orders or some adjustment. This designer’s clothing is the concept for a new generation of empowered women. The classic and oversized cuts are her favorites, and are regularly accompanied with feminine touches and fabrics that have weight and movement. It’s important for Cynthia to understand the diversity of the female figure, in order to offer silohuettes that favor every type of body. Her goal is for the women who wear her clothes to feel confident, secure and authentic.  Cynthia Buttenklepper was born in Ensenada, Baja California, and studied plastic arts in Monterrey and graduated from Barcelona’s Moda. For seven years, she has created infinite dresses, blouses, silk pants and leather ponchos – pieces that are now classics of her design. Her talent as a designer has allowed her to present her collections at several editions of Fashion Week Mexico.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
The Shops at Downtown
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The Shops at Downtown

Downtown Hotel is one of Mexico City’s favorite boutique hotels. Not only does it have a rooftop bar with a pool that is perfect for celebrating parties and birthdays, it also has an exclusive shopping area with more than 20 Mexican design stores simply named, The Shops. Here, you can find boutiques specialized in fashion, art, culture, gastronomy and design. Like, Syra Canús, Pineda Covalín, Social Factory, Flora María, Serra Workshop, Parakara Gallery, Purple Snail, Carla Fernández, Mongo and Harto Diseño Mexicano, and many others that offer clothing made by Mexican artisans from Chiapas, Guerrero, Puebla and Oaxaca. All of which employ a fair-trade policy. One of the stores with the most interesting pieces is Prison Art, which employs inmates from Mexican prisons to create accessories. Their job is to tattoo leather for purses, bags, backpacks and other pieces, of course, they make a percentage of each piece that’s sold. This is a great place to get a unique piece since no two are ever the same. Another of the must-sees is Fábrica Social, a company that promotes the development of textile artisans through a nomadic rural school. They offer clothing and accessories created by seven indigenous communities in Oaxaca, Chiapas, Yucatán, Hidalgo and Guerrero. Plan your visit ahead of time, because you will need more than an hour to completely explore this shopping center in the heart of the Historic Center and don’t forget to go up to the terrace and have a drink while you

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Carla Fernández
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Carla Fernández

Carla Fernández opened her boutique directly in front of Monica Patiños spot, Delirio. Here, you can find all of her signature items that have garnered her international recognition. Like the famous designs which with she pays homage to architect Luis Barragán. Every detail of the store is meticulously cared for, from the position of the clothing, to the way in which the milling bracelets, made by the artisan Juan Alonso, are displayed on sideboards. This store is like a review of the designer’s career. The pinnacle could be El Manual de la Diseñadora Descalza (The Barefoot Designer's Manua), a book in which Carla addresses the characteristics of the garments of different indigenous communities, as well as the geometric pattern that they follow in their designs, and which is available for the public to flip through. Almost all the clothes here are, one-size-fits-all, unisex, and “uni-age”, the last being a category established by the designer that refers to a piece that can be worn by a someone that’s anywhere from 17 to 70 with a guarantee that no matter the age, the wearer will look good. On the racks you’ll find her most recent collections where she works with five Yucatan indigenous communities. Each piece takes distinctive features of those regions like pompoms and figures embroidered with colorful threads and repurposes them. On the labels of the clothes is a YouTube link where you can watch the manufacturing of each garment. The prices range from 150 pesos for soc

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
See more Mexico City's best shops

Mexican handicrafts

Mercado Ciudadela
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Mercado Ciudadela

A colorful party unfolds at every step in this crafts market: the shelves are lined with skulls, jugs, jaguar heads made of black clay, wood or Huichol trinkets, traditional toys, palm baskets, saddlery, vases, pots and talavera plates, alebrijes and replicas of pre-Hispanic pieces. All of the crafts that can be found anywhere in the country's tourist centers can be also be found here. November 2015 marked its 50th anniversary and a massive celebration was held. Although it’s big and in the city center, there is private security, exclusive parking, CCTV monitoring throughout the corridors to ensure the safety of all, the walkways are wide, it’s open daily and in some stalls, you can see how the products are made. All of this makes a visit here truly a pleasant and unique experience While perusing, you’ll surely meet other tourists taking their picture with mariachi hats or wrestler masks; some even put on the leather sandals they just bought. It’s not just crafts here, though, you can eat in an inn and even enjoy a beer to temper the heat on the mezzanine and some stalls even sell tequila, mezcal or traditional candies. Some merchants will accept credit cards, but it’s always better to carry cash as that’s usually how to get the best price. Merchants will always encourage you to inspect and test the quality of their products – a phenomenal tactic because the more you look at it, the more you’ll want it. We challenge you to try to leave here empty-handed.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Tienda Fonart
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Tienda Fonart

The National Fund for the Promotion of Crafts is a government institution that supports the production and marketing of original pieces from artisans from different areas of the country. In addition to conducting contests and offering workshops at indigenous communities, in this one-level tent-gallery you’ll find colorful textiles and garments made from cotton and wool found on coast of the Mexican states of Guerrero, Oaxaca and Veracruz. There are also household like, glassware from Jalisco, lacquer jewelers made in Chiapas, ornamental pieces of Huichol art and alebrijes, among other things aimed at elevating the tradition of Mexican popular design.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Bazaar Sábado
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Bazaar Sábado

San Angel is an anomaly that feels like one of those "Magical Villages" of the Mexican countryside. In reality, when you’re here you’re only a few hundred meters from one of the busiest avenues in Mexico City. Even so, the strange mix of colonial houses and cobblestone streets remains strange. You can find some of the same crafts and restaurants here as you would in the closest Pueblo Magico, Tepoztlán. However, the vibe here is very much capitalist. At the core of this touristy village charm is the Bazaar Sábado. It’s only open on Saturdays and is home to crafts, exotic objects, art, design pieces, decorations, trinkets, and other nameless knick-knacks mostly reminiscent of Frida Kahlo and Guadalupe Posada. The Bazaar house is also home to a food space that’s more like an elevated traditional fonda; Fonda San Angel. The menu offers Mexican delights like, quesadillas. Our favorites are the chicken tinga, mushroom with cheese, and the Huitlacoche. Anyone who’s had quesadillas before will attest to the quality of these being the real deal. If you’re up for it, there’s even a buffet here and if you’re thirsty, try the mango, lime, strawberry, or tamarind mezcal margaritas.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Mercado de Coyoacán
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Mercado de Coyoacán

One of the areas with the highest number of visitors in the city is the Coyoacán neighborhood center. Its squares, restaurants, cafes, fountains, kiosks, and namesake market make it an ideal place to spend the day. Everything in this market is very traditional: the food, trinkets, art, and even the potpourri of smells makes this a one-of-a-kind experience. Passersby might think it’s just another market, however, there are certain peculiarities that make it different from others of its kind. Once you’re through the main part, the few clothing aisles start, which exists alongside random costumes, superheroes, television characters, clown accessories, helmets, masks, hats, you can even find rubber torsos to scare people with… this place is very random and fun. The crafts area is small, but it never hurts to walk around to see what calls your name or to appease your touristy friends.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars