Your ultimate guide to Mexico City

Restaurants and bars, museums and galleries, clubs and music, shops and more in Mexico City

The 25 best things to do in Mexico City
Things to do

The 25 best things to do in Mexico City

Choosing the best things to do in Mexico City is daunting task when you consider that it’s the 2nd largest city in the world. So we are giving ourselves the task of exploring the city, picking out the best events, places, free activities and unmissable hotspots for tourists and locals alike. You will come across everything from pre-hispanic ruins to eclectic architectural gems, places to exercise or go out at night and relive the US prohibition era in a speakeasy. We will also feature night visits to the best museums in the city, tours to admire the sunrise from high above and open air cinema in the middle of a lage. Dare yourself to discover these unmissable experiences in the city.

The 10 best attractions in Mexico City
Attractions

The 10 best attractions in Mexico City

Mexico City was founded on what was once the ancient Tenochtitlán, after the Aztecs are said to have witnessed an eagle perched atop a nopal while devouring a snake. You’re unlikely to see anything quite like this in Mexico’s capital nowadays, but you will see a huge range of stunning attractions that hark back to the city’s origins and rich history. If it’s your first time in Mexico City, we recommend starting with the following sights, which range from spacious parks to world-class museums and the monuments that give this metropolis its distinctive character.

The 10 best restaurants in Mexico City
Restaurants

The 10 best restaurants in Mexico City

The gastronomy of Mexico City reflects the history of Mexican cooking and it’s considered to be some of the best food in the world; but more specifically, it’s a collection of the most irreverent and exquisite follies of the genuines that call the shots with the stove. From Roma, Condesa and Polanco to other areas with gastronomic trends, Mexico City has its own unique voice when it comes to food. Here you can find the most traditional techniques and ingredients from Oaxaca, Yucatán and Michoacán; Spanish, French and Asian influences; as well as the use of more advanced technologies. From the deconstruction of a ‘mole’ sauce, a ‘taco placero’ or a ‘taco al pastor’ in the kitchen laboratories of Enrique Olvera’s Pujol; to the Jorge Vallejo’s quelites at Quintonil. The most noteworthy culinary approaches of Mexico’s capital city and of the rest of the world come together with to ask: what is haute cuisine? Experience all this at the 10 best restaurants in Mexico City.

The 10 best bars in Mexico City
Bars

The 10 best bars in Mexico City

Mexico City is full of nightlife surprises at every turn. Some of the best mixologists in the world can be found in Mexico City, in charge of the most iconic bars. Since 2016, Mica Rousseau has been recognized in the World Class as the best bartender in America for his Fifty Mils creations, while Limantour ranked 14th in the world on The World’s 50 Best Bars in 2017. Another highlight of the bars in Mexico City is the setting, such as the secret entrance to the 1920s world of USA prohibition found at the Hanky Panky Cocktail Bar, where you can also try the improved recipe of Ada “Coley” Coleman’s hanky panky drink from the Savoy Hotel in London. Discover using your senses the most seductive mixology formulas. You will experience the magic if you sit at the bar; it doesn’t matter if you don’t know what to order, the bartender will have a special combination of unmissable cocktails in these top nightlife bars of the city.

The 10 best boutique hotels in Mexico City
Hotels

The 10 best boutique hotels in Mexico City

Visiting Mexico City is a serious experience. As much for foreigners as for local tourists, there is something for everyone to enjoy thanks to such a huge range of activities: from dining at fantastic restaurants to discovering the best museums and buildings which we’ve included on our list of the 20 best things to do in Mexico City, at least once! The most important factor when it comes to immersing yourself in city life is to stay in a hotel that meets all your needs. If you’re coming on business, for a honeymoon or simply to chill and explore, we can recommend 10 boutique hotels that are well worth the visit. Some stand out for their luxury, others for their beautiful terraces and of course, not forgetting those that are renowned for their excellent service and cutting edge design. What do you say? Excited to visit Mexico City?

The best Mexico City restaurants

Pujol
Restaurants

Pujol

Cuisine as a philosophic expression. Food preparation as a subtle methodology. The restaurant as a place for introspection and the chef as a creator. When Enrique Olvera opened Pujol in 2000, Mexican gastronomy turned its eyes toward itself, to question its traditional processes. It cost us to become critical consciousness. Influenced by the most vanguard trends of the time, Olver deconstructed recipes of popular cuisine, leaving his daily plates unrecognizable. In just a few years, he went from being an eccentric chef to a public figure, indispensable in Mexico City’s gourmet scene. Magazine covers and new restaurant projects granted him the luck of ubiquity. For a while, toward the end of the decade he left his original restaurant a bit unattended; the creation lab of his plates. Never the less, when he returned to put his hands and mind in the kitchen, Pujol recuperated its original prestige, its masterfulness and the origins of its strength. In the chef’s own words, the concept changed from reimagining the delights of Mexican street food, to a personal creative search, which amplified his field of experience. All that work indeed offered a rich harvest. In 2011, Pujol was considered one of the 50 best restaurants in the world on the list of The 50 Best Restaurants. The plates that we could recommend for this review will probably not end up on the menu again, being that the offerings are permanent flux according to the season, and the daily availability of the produce

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Máximo Bistrot Local
Restaurants

Máximo Bistrot Local

“It’s the only thing I really know how to do,” Maximo’s Head Chef Eduardo Garcia humbly explains. Garcia was born in Guanajuato and emigrated to Atlanta with his family as a child where the only connection to Mexico he had left was his mom’s cooking. Later, to make a living, he started washing dishes at a restaurant where he learned to cook and although he never formally studied culinary arts, he ended up cooking at Le Bernadin, one of the best restaurants in New York City which specializes in Eurocentric classical cuisine.  Then, he met Chef Enrique Olvera in Vancouver and when Olvera found out that Garcia had worked at one of his favorite spots, he offered him a job at Pujol and the rest is, as they say, history. Over the three and a half years he spent working with Olvera, Eduardo realized that Mexico was in dire need of sustainable and environmentally conscious restaurants. So, he opened Maximo and to this day – years after he opened – it’s still nearly impossible to get a table without a reservation. Perched on a non-descript corner in the Roma neighborhood, Maximo still stays true to the Mexican-sourced farm-to-table concept. Everything here is local, from the napkins hand-sewn by artisans from Oaxaca to the daily-rotating menu which is crafted by local seasonal ingredients. Even the table bread is perfect; crunchy on the outside, soft on the inside and it’s made daily and served with a smattering of butters, from bean and sheep’s cheese, eggplant ash and goat chees

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Garum
Restaurants

Garum

Finally! This Vicente Torres – of Oli, Mercado Roma fame – Mediterranean masterpiece is open. Named after the legendary Roman fish sauce, it’s nothing short of an absolute must-visit but, don’t take our word for it. This spot fuses glam and attention to detail in every single dish and delivers on their promise to make your dinner unforgettable. The foie gras was brought over from OCA, the Valencian chef’s first restaurant, with its sweet wine and edible flowers. The rest of the menu is totally new and balances local products and Mediterranean flavor and while some of the dishes are steady staples, others are borderline audacious. The culinary evolution from the OCA days is evident. A couple of examples, both with cantina-esque flair, are the beef tartar with egg yolk foam and mustard ice cream – which runs the risk of being overly sweet because of the caramelized onions but, it’s balanced by the cold spicy mustard – and the drunken chocolate clam with sangrita snow cone and sea salt – basically, a michelada turned cold appetizer. The next course has the delectable mushrooms with pickled beef, egg yolk, and potatoes; a monochromatic brown and beige slap in the mouth of deep and fleshy flavors tempered by the yolk and roasted potato. We also loved the fire-grilled totoaba served with roasted onions and Japanese Pil Pil. This one is farmed fish perfection, tender flesh and crispy skin, perfectly paired with the scorched onion. Four courses and dessert (apple crumble, anyone?) is

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Merotoro
Restaurants

Merotoro

This simple and sophisticated spot lets the grub speak for itself. The menu has four Baja California themed courses with a hint of urban flair and is creatively curated by one of the best Mexican chefs in the game, Jair Téllez. A space that’s warm and friendly – with natural exposed wooden touches – helps diners focus on the food and drinks while avoiding distractions. The wine menu has a heavy Baja California presence and there are plenty of craft brews on deck. The dishes are carefully crafted so as to remain true to the daily-picked ingredients. Chef Téllez’s high standards are evident in the generously portioned organic, hormone-free, and, preferably, local elements he incorporates into each dish. It’s also for this reason that the menu is printed daily and there may be last-minute changes to the menu if a particular ingredient isn’t up to snuff. Pick whatever dish you want confidently, disappointment is never on the menu here. Some of our favorites are the marrow risotto and the pork jowl. The fourth course has truly heavenly desserts, like the tapioca almond cake, sweet plantains and banana ice cream. If it’s a hot day, we suggest the hibiscus and Mezcal snow cone served with mandarin sorbet and traditional spicy worm salt.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
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Mexico City bars and nightlife

The best speakeasies in Mexico City
Bars

The best speakeasies in Mexico City

Some of these cocktail bars have no signage, or at least unobvious signage, nor do they share their addresses on social media but you can often find them listed as some of the best bars in the world. These types of clubs prefer to hide themselves in unsuspecting places. Most of these bars have been inspired by the speakeasies and blind pigs of the 1920s Prohibition era in the United States, during which it was illegal to purchase or consume alcohol. Let yourself discover and explore these concept bars that will change your idea of an average night out on the town. 

Hotel Casa Awolly
Bars

Hotel Casa Awolly

There’s a bar where, rumor had it, they served a mean bone marrow. Its name you have to ask twice to get it right. I really was not prepared for the magnitude of what was awaiting on Sinaloa Street in the Roma neighborhood. The dining room on the ground floor had my senses instantly stimulated by the vibrant décor. Everything here is elegant and simulates a patio complete with a green floor with circular patterns that extend up the walls to the celling. I was seated next to a private room with a gleaming mahogany table surrounded by turquoise bookcases and using the wall as a projector screen for a Hayao Miyazaki film. The kitchen is Iraq Roaro’s and I tip my hat to him for his work on the bone marrow with short ribs. They bake the bone with panko breadcrumbs and dried chili peppers, they top it with caramelized pieces of short ribs and onions topped with a tomato salsa; finally served with tortillas. I’ve had a lot of bone marrow in 2016 and this one tops them all. I paired it with an aggi-doggi cocktail made with rum, Campari, plum compote, spicy chili, and grapefruit juice which, when combined, give it a marvelous balance of bitter and spicy. Upon arriving at the terrace bar, nicknamed Tigre, everything came together for me since Ramón Tovar (Gin Gin) is the head mixologist here. Their cocktail names are all tiger-themed, from historical to mythological. I ordered the Mezcal, matcha, and vermouth, Thigra; a refreshing smooth concoction served in an artisanal containe

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
The 10 best gay bars in Mexico City
LGBT

The 10 best gay bars in Mexico City

Mexico City is the capital of extravagant and exciting gay clubs and bars which, throughout their history, have reflected the crazy nightlife of the city. With that in mind, we have found those spaces filled with individuality and dedicated to the gay community, such as clubs with drag shows and bars especially suited for the lesbian community. In this list of unmissable gay clubs, you will find everything from the classic Tom’s Leather Bar that has been a daring and exhibitionist option since the 90s; to Zona Rosa’s preppy club, Kinky, with this gogos and strippers; and of course La Purísima, named on multiple occasions as one of the community’s favourites.

Licorería Limantour
Bars

Licorería Limantour

The renewed fascination with mixology in Mexico has a name, Limantour. It was one of the first bars in Mexico City to get off the beaten path and offer up something totally new at the time: a bar that goes beyond the martini. Here, cocktails are high science. With drinks that are bitter, sweet, herbal, and incorporate mezcal, gin and bitters in a fusion that evokes the barman of the 20s while simultaneously innovating. It’s all about perpetual motion. It’s not uncommon to find well-known guest bartenders at Limantour and, depending on the season, to participate in themed-contests, like a gin and tonic off or tea-infused cocktails competition. Although the 20-cocktail regular menu has international influences regularly and can transport you to an old bar in Buenos Aires, a simple Scottish pub or an underground dive in Brooklyn. Personally, I went with a proverbial road trip to Oaxaca with the hibiscus mezcal made with chocolate bitters. Served in a clay jar, a la Monte Albán mezcalería, the first sips go straight to your throat and warm up the soul. A few seconds later, the chocolate aftertaste strikes a surprising and almost captivating note. After Oaxaca, I headed to Argentina with the Florero Atlantico, named after one of the most famous Argentine bars. It’s served in a ceramic vase (as the name would suggest) crowned with bougainvillea flowers. Our first thought was “how am I supposed to drink that?” Well, we figured it out with little trouble and good thing because

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
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Cultural highlights in Mexico City

Museo Nacional de Antropología (MNA)
Museums

Museo Nacional de Antropología (MNA)

They say that school actually ruins a lot of things for us, for example those of us who studied Mexican history year after year in elementary school may have a consequential repulsion to the name Josefa Ortiz de Domínguez. The same happens with this museum, a favorite place of teachers, who managed to make a trip to see the marvelous collection seem like a punishment. Many of us haven’t been back since we were 10 years old, but it’s worth another chance. If you do, you’ll see the Toltec culture with new eyes now and better understand the Mexica and probably will have a new-found passion for the Maya. And if none of that is the case, at least the architecture will impress you. It’s impossible to see the entire museum in one day, but coming back and seeing the Coatlicue with adult eyes will change your perception of one of Mexico’s most important museums. After 54 years, it was necessary to restore its two great murals: “The World of the Maya” (Leonora Carrington) and the “Map of Meso-America” (Ernesto Vázquez y Luis Covarrubias). The restoration was completed under the direction of restorer Gilda Salgado and the museum’s conservation lab, who over a period of two months carried out the detailed salvage, with a surface cleaning using a vacuum and brushes; as well as the elimination of residues from previous restoration attempts. The magic world of the Maya is a work that evokes the myths and legends of the tzotziles and tzeltales cosmology, with whom Carrington had direct ex

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Teatro de la Ciudad Esperanza Iris
Theater

Teatro de la Ciudad Esperanza Iris

Located in the Centro Histórico, along Calle Donceles, is a majestic building that has born the name Esperanza Iris (1884-1962) Mexico’s “queen of the opera” for 100 years. In 1918, despite being in the throes of the Mexican Revolution, this building was constructed as one of the most important buildings in the country, as so it remains. Its architecture is inspired by neoclassical Greek and Roman temples (iconic columns and pilasters). It also features the busts of Giuseppe Verdi, Georges Bizet, Franz Lehar, Jacques Offenbach and Esperanza Iris. In its early years, this place became the exhibition space for great artist who debuted their works here in Latin America, even before taking them to New York, like Enrico Caruso, María Conesa and Giacomo Rimini. These days it’s home to the Coordinación del Sistema de Teatros de la Ciudad de México, and has been the headquarters of numerous festivals such as the Festival del Centro Histórico and the Festival Internacional Cervantino, as well as awards shows, including the Premios Metropolitanos, and the awards of the Asociación de Críticos and Periodistas Teatrales and los Premios Fénix. It’s a relevant art space and a must-stop for national and international advocates of theatre, dance, music and cinema disciplines. They’ve filled the theater’s more than 1,344 seats with artists such as Silvio Rodríguez, Pablo Milanese, Joan Manuel Serrat, Mario Benedetti, Daniele Finzi Pasca and Michael Nyman.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes
Museums

Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes

From a pessimistic view, the Palace of Fine Arts is an architectural Frankenstein. Optimistically, it’s an eclectic architecture building. In a purely functional way, it is a catalogue of fine marbles of all kinds. But we're being ironic. Obviously, it is one of the most important monuments in the capital, that together with the city’s other “palaces:” made up of government, mining sports and even a famous department store, have earned the very noble and very loyal city the nickname, “City of the Palaces.” Its construction began in 1904 during the Porfirio Diaz dictatorship, and its interiors were designed in the decades after the revolution. Its design runs from the Afrancesado neoclassicism of its 19th century facade, to the Art Nouveau of its concert hall with its gigantic stained glass that serves as a curtain and weighs 24 tons. Not to mention the vestibule’s impressive Art Deco construction. Add on its newest editions from the 1980s and we have a picturesque panorama of architectural styles, to say the least. The initial design was by Italian architect Adamo Boari (1863-1928), and was completed in 1934 by Mexican Federico E. Mariscal (1881-1971). Inside, there are several exhibition halls for plastic arts and history, and dominating its walls are some of the most imposing murals of the greatest Mexican Muralists: Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros, José Clemente Orozco, Roberto Montenegro and Jorge González Camarena. The palace’s theater is a forum for excellence

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
MUAC, Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo
Museums

MUAC, Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo

Art had ceased to be called modern in the last century and the city lacked a space dedicated exclusively to house the latest artistic endeavors, those that the younger generations were developing which now, for lack of a better name, is called contemporary art. It was at that point that emerged one of the most functional and beautiful museums in the city. Inaugurated in November 2008 and with an impressive design by Teodoro González de León, this is a multimodal space that also allows for the exhibition of retrospective work, which is a space of installations designed specifically for this building. Backed by the National Autonomous University of Mexico and located among the volcanic rock of its cultural center, the museum complements the fascinating creative offering that this campus has given to our city with concert halls (Sala Nezahualcóyotl and Sala Carlos Chávez), Dance halls (Sala Miguel Covarrubias), theaters (Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz forum, Teatro Juan Ruiz de Alarcón), Film (Julio Bracho and José Revueltas rooms), a cafeteria that has won prizes for its exquisite gastronomy (Azul y Oro) and a hallucinating sculpture space that extends into the El Pedegral ecological reserve. One of the museum’s most interesting offerings is the Experimental Sound Space: a dark room where sound works of all types are created. It’s worth getting informed about the temporary exhibits in that they are truly interesting. The museum has an excellent offering of workshops and seminars

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Teatro Telcel
Theater

Teatro Telcel

It's like Broadway... but in Polanco. That’s what was promised by creators of the newest and most well-equipped theatrical venue in Mexico City, similar to the New York Minskoff and the London Coliseum. Both of which are symbols of musical theatre. Located six floors underground, this auditorium is also considered to be the most complete in Latin America because it is the only one to have the Advanced Constellation Audio system, which includes 270 loudspeakers distributed throughout the room (24 x 24 meters). This is all to say that, from each of the 1,400 seats, the spectator hears as if their seat were only six meters from the stage. The construction of the Telcel Theatre began in 2008 and the design concept was headed by Spanish architect Antón García Abril, who borrowed from the composition of ancient Mexica temples, by creating terraces and platforms. The main design allows the access of natural light, similar to pre-Columbian architecture. The hall was created by Mexican architect José de Arimathea Moyao, who has been in charge of designing important stages such as the Sun Forum, the Pepsi Center and the Telmex Auditorium in Guadalajara. Since comfort is a requirement for the enjoyment of any show, the armchairs are 52 centimeters wide and interspersed so that the people in front of you don’t hinder your visibility. The distance between each row is an refreshing 95 centimeters. Federico González Compean, corporate director of the international division of the CIE g

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Museo Nacional de Historia
Museums

Museo Nacional de Historia

The National Museum of History, located within the Chapultepec Castle, is a place that narrates the transcendental eras of Mexican history. If its walls could talk, they’d surely tell us about the stay of emperors Carlota and Maximiliano, the events of the Niños Heroes battle and the presidential term of Lázaro Cárdenas, who in 1939 declared the space a historic heritage space and gave it its current name. This building has been a chapel, a gunpowder factory, headquarters of Guadalupe Victoria’s government, classrooms for the Military College and the home of Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada. When you visit, you’ll quickly realize that one day isn’t enough to see the entire thing. But you can plan your itinerary or take a guided tour, both strategies to help you make the best of your time. In the Sigueiros room, you’ll find the era of New Spain through the modernity of the 20th century. The upper floor features European-style wardrobe, furniture and ornate decoration. Last but certainly not least, the library, open Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
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Sights and attractions in Mexico City

The floating gardens of Xochimilco
Things to do

The floating gardens of Xochimilco

One of the most classic places to visit in Mexico City is Xochimilco. Since 1930, they’ve been offering tourist trips in trajineras through more than 184 kilometers of waters that integrate the zone’s canals and chinampas.   The chinampas represent a cultivation method that has been used since pre-Hispanic times in the Valley of Mexico. The area was, after all, a lake, and the best way to farm was to use artificial islands in the lake itself. Today, they are an example of sustainability and productivity: they provide five annual harvests of high-quality vegetables. Yolcan, a project that focuses on fair trade and rehabilitation of the chinampas, offers a food club that delivers fresh produce from farms in Xochimilco to homes and businesses across the city.  Enter the canals of Xochimilco and enjoy its trajinera tours, along with the theater programs during the Day of the Dead season and discover the richness of its ecological reserve. And don’t forget to take advantage of a snack or two during your tour.

The best Frida Kahlo art in Mexico City
Art

The best Frida Kahlo art in Mexico City

Mexico City is home to legacy of many great Mexican artists, such as the muralists Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros and José Clemente Orozco. The painter Frida Kahlo is no exception. Frida Kahlo’s life was marked by tragic events, such as the accident she suffered at age 18 which caused various fractures in her spinal column. The painter surrounded herself with the great muralists of that era and maintained a strong transgressive opinion in regards to topics such as politics and gender. All this was depicted in her work of art which André Breton labelled as surrealist, but for her it was nothing more than her feelings. Metaphorically, sensitive and hostile are adjectives which are used to describe her work and that has made her one of the most emblematic Mexican artists in the world. Her work has been exhibited in places such as the Orangerie Museum in Paris, the Botanical Garden in New York and the Cultural Museum of Milan. Find out which of Mexico City’s museums exhibit her work, such as the Frida Kahlo Museum, “Casa Azul”, where she was born on 6th July 1907 and also died on 13th July 1954; in fact, her ashes are now found in what used to be her bedroom. You can also discover other spaces, such as the Studio House of Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, in which the architect Juan O’Gorman (1932) understood Diego and Frida’s needs, combined them with his own queries and exhibited the result in a functioning building.

Bosque de Chapultepec
Things to do

Bosque de Chapultepec

Stepping foot in Chapultepec is obligatory for any Mexico City resident, and equally for its visitors, being that it’s one of the spaces that best maintains its tradition and history. Children, adolescents and adults enjoy various activities, such as feeding the enormous fish that inhabit the lakes, visiting the animals in the zoo or running and exercising in the forest. In the first section, there’s the sense of art and history, that house museums and cultural buildings like the Casa del Lago Juan José Arreola, the Museo de Arte Moderno, the Museo Tamayo and that of Antropología e Historia, in addition to the legendary Castillo de Chapultepec, scene of the Batalla del Molino del Rey y of the assault of the Colegio Militar, during the North American Intervention of 1847.

The best archaeological sites in Mexico City
Things to do

The best archaeological sites in Mexico City

Mexico's pre-Hispanic era (which chronologically began in the year 2000 BC) is culturally rich and particularly captivating. The experience of seeing with our own eyes the grandeur that was the pre-Hispanic villages through their architecture, daily tools and other objects of either religious or decorative significance, is the best way of taking us back in time to understand the Aztec way of life. The best archaeological sites in Mexico City, and the surrounding areas, are both excellent options for a trip in order grasp the pre-Hispanic history of Mexico. These sites give us a clearer idea of the social and religious relations that existed within these spaces and they allow us to marvel at the passage of time and the contrasts with current society.  Be prepared for your expedition! We highly recommend comfortable footwear, drinking water, a hat and sunscreen.

Ángel de la Independencia
Things to do

Ángel de la Independencia

Its official name is Monumento a la Independencia. It’s a meeting point and a starting point. While those who step foot here may not know it, they are standing on the remains of those who made this country. Before becoming the headquarters for important social protests and rallies, the monument was a mausoleum formed by a slanted zócalo, a quarry-stone column standing 35 meters high, and the statue of the Winged Victory of Samothrace at the top – designed by architect Antonio Rivas Mercado. It’s still possible to visit the urns and the sculptures of the 14 national heroes that are interred in the space: Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, Ignacio Allende, Juan Aldama, José Mariano Jiménez, José María Morelos y Pavón, Mariano Matamoros, Francisco Javier Mina, Guadalupe Victoria, Vicente Guerrero, Nicolás Bravo, Leona Vicario, Andrés Quintana Roo, Víctor Rosales and Pedro Romero. Also referred to simply as “El Ángel,” the monument has a small 360-degree lookout. To access the top, you must ask permission at the Delegación Cuauhtémoc (Aldama s/n, esq. Mina, Buenavista), in the Patrimonio Cultural area, from 10am to 2pm. The person in charge of the group that will go to the lookout must show their official identification (INE) in the Patrimonio Cultural, where they will provide you with a date and time for your visit. The procedure is free of cost.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
The best things to do in Ciudad Universitaria UNAM
Things to do

The best things to do in Ciudad Universitaria UNAM

During the 40s, modernity and development in the country was uncontrollable, as was industrialization which claimed to materialize an architectural centre where the first activities of the most important cultural and academic project of the country began: the National Autonomous University of Mexico. In 1952, Ciudad Universitaria was inaugurated by the President Miguel Alemán, and in 2007 it was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site. We invite you to enjoy this architectural landmark of the 20th Century in Mexico; visit its museums, enjoy the views and the green space and admire the different artistic portrayals which are found all over this cultural hotspot.

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