Worldwide icon-chevron-right Europe icon-chevron-right Italy icon-chevron-right Milan icon-chevron-right Restaurants

Restaurants

Your guide to Milan's best restaurants, with reviews and editors' picks

The 15 best bars in Milan
Bars and pubs

The 15 best bars in Milan

Even advertising agencies are aware of the supremacy of the best bars in Milan. In 1985, the tagline for an ad for Amaro Ramazzotti, a digestif, christened the city as “Milano da bere,” which literally translates to “Milan to drink [up].” The line was representative of a vibrant and pulsating town, embodying the zeitgeist of the ‘80s, when Milan was a de facto city of ambition, hustle and hedonism, all conveyed through the social ritual of aperitivo, the pre-dinner drink, which, to this day, is both a social, scene-y and purely gourmet experience. The local drinking culture dates back to the late 19th and early 20th centuries, around the time when Gaspare Campari began producing his eponymous bitters in a factory outside of the city and serving them as pre-dinner drinks meant to stimulate rather than spoil the appetite. And while Campari is still a foundation of many pre-dinner cocktails that are beloved by the Milanese (hello, Negroni and Campari Spritz!) alongside other light-bodied bitters like Aperol and Cocchi Americano, the hipster epidemic has invaded Milan too and, as a consequence, it’s not hard to find establishments such as Rita & Cocktails, Nottingham Forest and Santeria serving highly creative concoctions that move away from the classic drinks the citizenry is used to. Milan’s craft beer scene, on the other hand, while less visibly trendy, has its accolades, too: at Bere Buona Birra and Lambiczoon expect to wax poetic about lambics, saisons and gueuze. With t

Where to eat the best pizza in Milan
Restaurants

Where to eat the best pizza in Milan

The best pizza in Milan comes with a side of history that encompasses all of Italy. Whereas Naples’ version of the delicacy follows strict rules (round, soft, with a raised edge that is free from burns) that have earned it a UNESCO World Heritage status, pizzaioli (pizza makers) from Rome serve the stuff al taglio (by the slice) or as crispier, round pizza Romana. Milan, on the other hand, has never boasted a distinctive pizza style, benefiting instead from a culinary reputation centred around cotoletta Milanese (a sort of cutlet), risotto and other local eats. Milan favourite Spontini has been the one big name on the local pizza scene since the 1950s, serving thick triangular slices of Margherita (with the addition of one not-so-secret ingredient, anchovies) that many grab on-the-go, but typical round pizzas – larger in circumference and with a cracker-thin crust – have been traditionally unremarkable. That all changed when the Expo 2015 swept into town, bringing along with it a focus on food that has led to a local restaurant and bar revolution. In terms of pizza, this has meant an influx of big-name Neapolitan players as well as a rise in homegrown artisanal offerings. Today, discerning Milanese want to know everything from how long the dough is allowed to rise to the provenance of the oregano lightly dusted on the finished product. And we’re here to enjoy it all. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in Milan

How to eat like a local in Milan
Restaurants

How to eat like a local in Milan

Milan's culinary scene is bound to tickle any type of eater's taste buds: home to plenty of migrants, it boasts food whipped up by chefs from all around Italy and beyond. Which means you'll just as easily come across Sicilian food (arancini! Muffuletta! Scacciata!) or sushi as you will traditional Milanese fare. Speaking of traditional local eats: the city's restaurants are clearly at their best when they embrace all that Lombardy has to offer. The region's gastronomical ethos embraces the stolic, hard-working mountain folk that render it what it is on a cultural level as well. That’s why some of the city’s best food – often heavy, often meat-based, very rarely Instagrammable – isn’t found in the most fashionable eateries and bars but rather in down-home, unpretentious trattorias that have perfected Milanese comfort food after years of practice. Start with polenta, made with boiled cornmeal, and work your way through cassoeula, a cabbage and pork stew, panettone, a fruitcake of sorts, and beyond. Buon appetito! RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in Milan