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News / City Life

Nine NYC bridges and tunnels are raising toll prices on Sunday

Nine NYC bridges and tunnels are raising toll prices on Sunday
Photograph: Courtesy CC/Wikimedia Commons/Jim Henderson

On Sunday, New Yorkers will awake to a brand new world in which a 30-day unlimited ride MTA pass costs $121 instead of $116.50, and a seven-day pass costs $32 instead of $31. But drivers in the city will also see some slight increases in the cost of their commutes. 

The MTA Board proposes and approves fare and toll hikes across all of its properties every two years, and 2017's price increases are the lowest since 2009. Toll hikes on nine of New York's bridges and tunnels will go into effect on Sunday, which will make owning a car in the city even more of a confusing life choice. The toll increase for E-ZPass users will be fairly marginal across all of the affected routes, but those paying cash will bear the brunt of the impact. 

Tolls on the Robert F. Kennedy, Throgs Neck, Bronx-Whitestone bridges and the Brooklyn–Battery and Queens Midtown tunnels will rise from $5.54 to $5.76 for E-ZPass users, and from $8 to $8.50 for cash payments.

Driving into Staten Island via the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge will cost E-ZPass users $11.52, up from $11.08, and the cash cost will go up to a whopping $17 from $16. Tolls are not collected on Brooklyn-bound trips across the bridge.

The toll on the Henry Hudson Bridge is raising by a dime for E-ZPass users to $2.64, and by 50 cents for those paying cash to $6. 

The Marine Parkway–Gil Hodges Memorial and Cross Bay Veterans Memorial bridges will remain the cheapest under MTA jurisdiction, and will also see the smallest toll hikes. The cost of those routes will increase from $2.08 to $2.16 for E-ZPass users, and from $4 to $4.25 for cash payments.

Hopefully you've been collecting your nickels and dimes, New York, because the MTA is about to take all of them. 

 

 

 

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