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Photograph: Courtesy CC/Flickr/carnagenyc

Seven ways you can spot a real New Yorker when it's snowing out

By
Taya Kenny
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New Yorkers are tough, they are real, and they know how to navigate snowstorms like Indiana Jones knows how to navigate Aztec temples. And like Indy, they get out of the struggle of snowy days calmly, confidently, and without ever losing their hat (in this case, a really warm insulated beanie). Sure, everyone can get behind a scarf and a PSL and stroll through Central Park saying “isn’t it so nice it’s finally cold!”. But what separates the real New Yorkers and the wannabes are those snowy days when even a simple stroll around the neighborhood turns into an epic struggle. Here are the top signs of a real New Yorker in the snow:

1. When the person ahead of them at the Duane Reade counter buying table salt and asks, “Is this enough to melt a driveway?” they think “No, but it will make it delicious."

2. They don’t just tip the delivery man extra, they make him a damn cup of coffee and salute him on his way out.

3. In high school, they didn’t get what the lead characters in Jack London and Gary Paulsen novels were complaining about. Just getting to school on the F train in February sounded way worse than any winter wilderness debacle in Hatchet.

4. They don’t dream about it being 80 degrees on a sunny tropical beach, they dream about it being 10 degrees warmer and wearing a slightly less ugly coat.

5. They do not like your snow-angel selfie Instagram posts. Yes, the sexy Eskimo look is great on you now, but they know you’re just one gross slush-puddle away from applying to jobs in California. 

6. That being said, you don’t like any of your Cali friends' selfies either. Sure, that al fresco beer looks good now, but those fools have no idea about all of the character building they're missing out on by not trudging home without any feeling in their toes.  

7. They seem totally un-fazed by any of it actually. Because after all, it’s still better than rain. Or the sweltering heat in August. Or bedbugs.

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