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New York Film Festival 2016

Here’s everything you need to know about New York Film Festival 2016, including screenings, reviews and ticket info

The Lost City of Z

Easily one of the best things to do in the fall, the New York Film Festival stretches back to 1963, when it established a mission of bringing the best work from around the world to Lincoln Center. Selma director Ava DuVernay’s race-related incarceration documentary The 13th opens 2016’s New York Film Festival, followed by numerous movie screenings and events.

When is the New York Film Festival?

The festival runs from Friday, September 30, 2016 to Sunday, October 16, 2016.

Where is the New York Film Festival?

The festival’s main venue is Lincoln Center’s swanky Alice Tully Hall, located at 1941 Broadway (between 65th and 66th Sts). All Main Slate titles have an initial screening there, with subsequent screenings at various Lincoln Center venues, including the Walter Reade Theater (165 W. 65th St) and the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center (144 W. 65th St).

How do I get tickets?

Buy tickets at the official festival website.

New York Film Festival 2016

Here’s the official lineup for the New York Film Festival
Blog

Here’s the official lineup for the New York Film Festival

An invited group of press got the scoop on the forthcoming lineup for the 54th New York Film Festival

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The opening film at this year’s New York Film Festival will make history
Blog

The opening film at this year’s New York Film Festival will make history

Over its illustrious 54-year history, the New York Film Festival has hosted some truly significant world premieres, from Bernardo Bertolucci's incendiary Last Tango in Paris in 1972 to David Fincher's Gone Girl.

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New York Film Festival 2015

The 10 best movies at the 2015 New York Film Festival
Movies

The 10 best movies at the 2015 New York Film Festival

Attend the NYFF in confidence by seeking out these essential titles, chosen by our film critics

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New York Film Festival 2014

The 10 best NYFF films
Movies

The 10 best NYFF films

Want to know what to see at NYFF? Check out our top picks

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Interview: David Fincher
Movies

Interview: David Fincher

We talk with the onetime cinematic bad boy about sharpening his claws again

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Inherent Vice
Movies

Inherent Vice

Ever since Boogie Nights, the untamable Paul Thomas Anderson has thrilled us with the mania of self-made men—porn stars, game-show hosts, oil prospectors and cultists. Now, for a change, the director grabs you by the nose: Inherent Vice, Anderson's sexy, swirling latest (based on Thomas Pynchon's exquisite stoner mystery set at the dawn of the '70s), is a wondrously fragrant movie, emanating sweat, the stink of pot clouds and the press of hairy bodies. It's a film you sink into, like a haze on the road, even as it jerks you along with spikes of humor. "Go back to the beach, you smell like a patchouli fart." growls Josh Brolin's flat-topped L.A. detective, Bigfoot Bjornsen, to our dazed hero, Doc (Joaquin Phoenix), an unlikely private eye, but one you can't help rooting for. We're in a semifictionalized version of California, sort of like the real thing but scented with hallucinogenic behavior, weird restaurant menus and Manson-era paranoia. (Maybe that's not so altered at all.) Inherent Vice is the first time that Pynchon's elaborately dense prose has made it to the screen, and for good reason. Finally, with this novel, a recognizable thrust could be seen: an us-versus-them hippy fantasia decked out in the trappings of noir. Anderson doesn't so much adapt the novel as hawk it up on the screen proudly, in faithful chunks. (His screenplay is said to have received the author's blessing.) And the movie he's ended up with is astounding: literary, loose-limbed and simply impossible

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Gone Girl
Movies

Gone Girl

Director David Fincher adapts bestselling novelist Gillian Flynn with a cast including Rosamund Pike (finally getting a proper starring role), Ben Affleck and the ever-wonderful Neil Patrick Harris. In Flynn’s rip-roaring novel, a husband (Affleck) goes in search of his missing wife (Pike) and turns up a lot more than he bargained for. But while we did enjoy the book, we’ll admit to being ever so slightly disappointed that Fincher has chosen to follow ‘The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo’ with yet another pulpy crime thriller, particularly when his last three original projects – ‘Zodiac’, ‘Benjamin Button’ and ‘The Social Network’ – showed a fine director becoming a truly great one. That said, this is bound to be a pulse-racing watch.

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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New York Film Festival 2013

About Time
Movies

About Time

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Abuse of Weakness
Movies

Abuse of Weakness

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Alan Partridge
Movies

Alan Partridge

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All Is Lost
Movies

All Is Lost

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New York Film Festival 2012

Amour
Movies

Amour

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Araf—Somewhere in Between
Movies

Araf—Somewhere in Between

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Barbara
Movies

Barbara

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The Bay
Movies

The Bay

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