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American Museum of Natural History

  • Museums
  • Upper West Side
  • price 2 of 4
  • Recommended
American Museum of Natural History
Photograph: Marielle Solan
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Time Out says

Beyond the iconic, show-stopping displays–the grizzly bear in the Hall of North American Mammals, the 94-feet long blue whale, the prehistoric Barosaurus skeleton rearing up as if to scare the adjacent Allosaurus skeleton–is an expertly curated, 148-year-old museum that fills visitors of all ages with a curiosity about the universe. Whether you’re interested in the world below our feet, or the cultures of faraway lands or the stars light-years beyond our reach, your visit is bound to teach you a few things you never knew. With four floors filled to the brim with artifacts, you could spend a whole day just looking at the taxidermied animals that hail from from North America, Asia, Africa, rain forests and the ocean. Or, conversely, spend a day like an anthropologist, studying just the human species, with halls dedicated to different cultures of American Indians (Eastern Woodland, Plains, North West Pacific), Asian peoples, African Peoples, Pacific Peoples, and, before these rich cultures existed, the evolutionary origins of humans and our near (now extinct) cousins, like neanderthals. Someone with an inner-geologist, or just a love of sparkly rocks, will feel like a kid in the hall of gems and the hall of minerals. And nearly everyone is filled with child-like awe in the presence of the Tyrannosaurus Rex, Wooly Mammoth and the Apatosaurus in the fourth floor’s world-renowned fossil collection.

Admission to the museum is a suggested donation, which is great for anyone who wants to see big dinos for little dinero. However, for access to the amazing special exhibits like the annual Butterfly Conservatory or the mesmerizing Space Show in the Hayden Planetarium, you’ll have to shell out more (For one special exhibit $27, students and seniors $22, children $16). Many who are looking to spend the whole day at the museum should consider the Super Saver tickets ($35, students and seniors $28, children $22), which includes admission to as many special exhibits, IMax films and the Space Show as you can feasibly schedule in one day.

RECOMMENDED: 101 best things do in NYC

Written by
Tolly Wright

Details

Address:
Central Park West at 79th St
New York
10024
Transport:
Subway: B, C to 81st St–Museum of Natural History; 1 to 79th St
Price:
Suggested donation $23, seniors and students $18, children 2–12 $12.50, children under 2 free.
Opening hours:
Daily 10am–5:45pm
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What’s on

Extinct and Endangered: Insects in Peril

Insects are misunderstood but a new macro photography exhibition at AMNH hopes to change that. Photographer Levon Biss has photographed 40 endangered species (selected from specimens in the Museum’s world-class research collection), which will be shown as large-format photographs as large as 4.5 by 8 feet in the Akeley Gallery and the adjacent East Galleria. Some of the extinct and endangered specimens are more than 100 years old but are almost brought back to life through the photos that show their extreme detail and intricate features, including the well-known monarch butterfly and the nine-spotted ladybug to the remote Lord Howe Island stick insect of Australia (thought to be extinct for most of the 20th century until a tiny population was discovered and bred in captivity starting in 2003.) Each photograph in Extinct and Endangered took about three weeks to create from up to 10,000 individual images shot using special lenses. “We are delighted to showcase Levon Biss’s breathtaking photographs to engage, inspire, and educate our visitors about the critical need to conserve these glorious and diverse animals which, though small, are essential to Earth’s complex ecosystems,” said Ellen V. Futter, President of the American Museum of Natural History.  “We look forward to further educating about insects when we open the spectacular Solomon Family Insectarium next year as part of the Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation, which will also feature Biss’s stunning pho

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