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Pier 76 rendering nyc
Rendering: Courtesy New York State Parks

Here's what Manhattan's newest waterfront park will look like when it opens this summer

Pier 76 will have space for walking and benches for people to relax and enjoy the waterfront views.

Shaye Weaver
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Shaye Weaver
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By June 1, New Yorkers will have a brand new park to sunbathe, walk and breathe in fresh air.

Pier 76, which is currently an empty New York City Police Department impound parking facility at West 38th Street and 12th Avenue, is undergoing major reconstruction to become a new recreational space with a walking area, flexible space and benches for people to relax and enjoy the waterfront views.

RECOMMENDED: See how different Central Park’s Lasker Rink will look after its reconstruction

The state released new renderings of the space on Wednesday:

Pier 76 rendering nyc
Rendering: Courtesy New York State Parks
Pier 76 rendering nyc
Rendering: Courtesy New York State Parks
Pier 76 rendering nyc
Rendering: Courtesy New York State Parks

The state Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation has already started partially demolishing the 245,000-square-foot impound facility at the pier, which will also see environmental abatement, repaving, and installation of railings and lighting all by June 1.

Governor Andrew Cuomo said the $20 million construction project once completed will be a "crown jewel" for the Hudson River Park.

"COVID highlighted the importance of outdoor recreational spaces for New Yorkers, and it is critical that we expand open space as we continue to build back better," he said said. "After more than 20 years of inaction, the transformation of Pier 76 will convert a blight on Manhattan's western shore into a crown jewel for the Hudson River Park and create a beloved urban recreational space that will be enjoyed by all for generations to come."

Cuomo announced renewed plans for the park during his State of the State Address this year, so in January New York City relinquished control of the 5.6-acre site to New York State. Hudson River Park Trust will lease the pier from State Parks to manage it like it does Hudson River Park.

"Friends is excited to see the old tow pound at Pier 76 finally coming down. Anywhere that we can create new open space for New Yorkers, particularly now - during the pandemic — is a great benefit for all of us," Hudson River Park Friends Executive Director Connie Fishman said. "The local neighborhoods will love having this new recreational opportunity to take advantage of with such a high demand right now for all our parks and open spaces, and this community has waited a very long time for this to happen."

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