Worldwide icon-chevron-right North America icon-chevron-right United States icon-chevron-right New York State icon-chevron-right New York icon-chevron-right This digital comedy show is taking place inside a Google Doc this week
Marissa Goldman
Photograph: Courtesy Marissa Goldman

This digital comedy show is taking place inside a Google Doc this week

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Comedians are getting creative on how to entertain the public during this time of social distancing.

While live-streaming has become the go-to, Marissa Goldman of Stacy and Nerd Herderz is taking to Google Docs to host her comedian-packed quarantine party each week as long as New Yorkers have to isolate.

Usually reserved for collaboration between employees, Google Docs in this case serves as a real-time way for comedians to share their jokes.

"Everyone was obviously feeling lonely and scared and a lot of comedy shows got canceled, so I wanted to do something," Goldman says. "I thought, 'What if we just had comics add things to a Google Doc? That's kinda fun and weird, right?' And it all kinda snowballed from there. It was going to just be my friends, but as it turns out, a lot of people had nothing to do. I thought that the most accessible way to do a collaborative thing with a group of people was Google Docs. I also just thought using Google Docs in this way was funny. And anyone can look at it."

All at-home viewers need to do is head to the Google Doc link at 8pm on March 21 (and on following Saturdays) and watch the party unfold.

Each performer has a designated are on the doc. You can click on their name when their slot comes up.

This week's lineup includes Dan Chamberlain (The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon), Mary Houlihan (Comedy Central, Reductress), Jeremy Levick and Rajat Suresh (The Onion), Brian Fiddyment, artist Jo Rosenthal, Ena Da and Rachel Coster. With tech by Mike Lacy will provide the tech help and Matt Albani will DJ.

Each Quarantine Party is for free, although Goldman asks people to consider donating.

"We spend almost every night telling jokes to humans in the flesh, so there's definitely a void for a lot of us right now," Goldman admits. "I mean that is the case for everyone, but our job requires other people a lot. Obviously, it would be great to really monetize and pay the performers if it gets bigger. We made some money because I asked for donations but hope to make more next time!"

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