Worldwide icon-chevron-right North America icon-chevron-right United States icon-chevron-right New York State icon-chevron-right New York icon-chevron-right The Feed first look: Yunnan Kitchen

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Photograph: Jakob N. LaymanShao kao grilled lamb meatball skewers at Yunnan Kitchen
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Photograph: Jakob N. LaymanShao kao shishito pepper and potato skewers at Yunnan Kitchen
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Photograph: Jakob N. LaymanShao kao marinated tofu skewers at Yunnan Kitchen
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Photograph: Jakob N. LaymanCharred eggplant at Yunnan Kitchen
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Photograph: Jakob N. LaymanTofu ribbon salad at Yunnan Kitchen
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Photograph: Jakob N. LaymanYunnan Kitchen
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Photograph: Jakob N. LaymanYunnan Kitchen

The Feed first look: Yunnan Kitchen

New this week.

By Mari Uyehara
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The lusty dishes of Canton, Hunan and Sichuan have long dominated New York's Chinese-restaurant scene. But recently, lesser-known regions (repped by spots like Xi'an Famous Foods and Henan Flavor) and nouveau Greenmarket sensibilities (led by Food & Drink Award winner RedFarm) have come to the fore. In late April, Gotham's Chinese-food fanatics can plunge their chopsticks into Yunnan-style bowls at this bright 54-seat eatery, thanks to Erika Chou. The second-generation Chinese-American fell for the delicate cuisine of Yunnan—distinct for its use of mushrooms, raw salads and dairy, as well as commingling influences from Laos, Vietnam and Burma—on a trip back to the motherland. She's teamed up with locavore-trained chef Travis Post (Franny's) to open this tribute to Yunnan, serving traditional dishes made with local ingredients, like produce from Maxwell's Farm and a custom Chinese sausage from Salumeria Biellese. The menu of small plates includes rarities like a jasmine-flower omelette, crispy shrimp with fried wild lime leaves and grilled lamb meatball skewers with pickled chive blossoms. Chou's former career in fashion comes through in the decor: The window-lined space is decorated with finds from her travels—heirloom tin necklaces, embroidered belts, hand-painted ceramic teapots and an antique tiger-print rug. 79 Clinton St between Delancey and Rivington Sts (212-253-2527)

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