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Citi Bike docking station in Dumbo
Photograph: Amy Plitt Citi Bike docking station in Dumbo

Bike NYC: Time Out’s Citi Bike-for-dummies guide

Discover everything you need to know about the wildly popular NYC bike-share program in this handy resource.

By Kenny Herzog
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What happens if I get a flat? Or my ride gets stolen? Before you take your next (or first) Citi Bike excursion, brush up on the rules of the NYC bike-share program. Plus, discover great bike paths.

RECOMMENDED: The best ways to bike New York

Can I ride again later in the day after docking?
You can ride as many times as you want—just so long as each jaunt is 30 minutes or less (or under 45 minutes if you’re an annual member). Think of Citi Bike passes as unlimited MetroCards—if your subway rides afforded you a finite amount of time.

How much does this cost?
There are three options: annual membership ($169), a 24-hour pass ($12) and a three-day pass ($24). (Overtime fees and taxes also apply.)

Note: The first 30 minutes of each ride on a classic Citi Bike are included in the pass price. When you upgrade your ride to an ebike, only available in the Citi Bike app, it will be an extra $0.15 per minute.

If you keep a bike out for longer than 30 minutes at a time, regardless of the type, it's an additional $4 every 15 minutes.

To avoid extra time fees, keep your rides to 30 minutes each. 

What if I’m returning my bike and there are no available docks?
There’s a “time credit” option on the kiosk that gives you an extra 15 minutes to find a nearby station with available docks.

What if my bike’s broken or has a flat?
Return it, push the white wrench button atop the dock (which alerts staffers of the issue) and unlock a different ride.

Are the bikes one size fits all?

Yep. They have adjustable seats.

What if I get in an accident while riding?
First, call the police. Second, dial 855-BIKE-311 and talk to a CB staffer. Just be aware of the fine print stating that the bike is your responsibility until it’s docked or in a rep’s possession. Oh, and if your bike is stolen, call that number within 24 hours and brace for a possible charge on your credit card covering its recovery or replacement.

Isn’t this kind of gross?
So are subways and buses. It’s New York.

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