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Natalie Aldern

Natalie Aldern

Articles (9)

The 13 best bars in Rome

The 13 best bars in Rome

When in Rome, do as the Romans. Has there ever been an article written about the Eternal City that didn’t use that famous phrase? No matter how cliched it might be, it is definitely true when it comes to the best bars in Rome. People have been having a good time here since the beginning, and they’ll be partying in the Italian capital for the rest of time. That whole ‘Eternal City’ thing isn’t just a name, you know.As is the general rule with nightlife in Rome, things don’t crank into gear until late at night. It is all worth waiting for, and it also allows you to get in an afternoon nap. When it comes to the best things to do in Rome, a night of bar-hopping is a must.

Where to stay in Rome

Where to stay in Rome

Choosing where to stay in Rome is no easy task. The Italian capital is massive, and the eternal battle between ancient history and modern neighbourhoods isn’t about to end anytime soon. That throws up plenty of difficult questions to answer for the prospective visitor. Do you blow the budget on a boutique hotel near the Forum? Or cosy up with the Eternal City’s edgier residents? Or do you simply book one of the best hotels in the historical centre and get focused on monument bingo?There are no wrong answers, in truth. No matter where you stay in Rome, you’ll find plenty to keep you occupied. Check out our guide to the five best neighbourhoods of the Eternal City, and let your heart (wallet and interests) guide you.  

Get up close and personal with the most beautiful buildings in Rome

Get up close and personal with the most beautiful buildings in Rome

The chaotic emperors of Rome may have had their faults, but a commitment to beauty was not among them. Rome is full of gorgeous ancient ruins, beautiful reminders that have been seamlessly incorporated into the day-to-day life of modern Rome, coming together to create an enduring and enchanting city. Designers of Rome, you did a stellar job. You’ll take plenty of photos in Rome, of course, but always remember that the eye is the greatest camera ever invented. Nothing beats staring up at the most beautiful buildings in Rome and taking it all in, and it makes for a captivating experience that you'll never forget. The Italian capital is a thrilling place of renowned attractions and incredible food, all housed in beautiful buildings waiting to be adored.

How to eat like a local in Rome

How to eat like a local in Rome

Just when you thought Rome couldn’t get any better, the dinner bell hits. Okay, a literal dinner bell doesn’t ring out across the city, but visitors to this most famous of cities will be able to indulge in the best version of that ‘when in Rome’ cliche. To cut a long story short, when in Rome you should eat like royalty. That doesn’t mean fancy clothes and banquets, it means great food full of flavour, heritage and story. The Italian capital has great restaurants and pizzerias on every corner, serving local dishes to hungry locals and tired visitors. Want to eat like a local in Rome? Yes, you do, and these are the places to seek out.

The 10 best hotels in Venice

The 10 best hotels in Venice

Looking for the best hotels in Venice? Made up of 117 small islands linked by 400 bridges, this city feels more like a fairytale than a modern European metropolis. Romantic and classic to its core, Venice boasts hotels that err on the side of opulence and are stuffed with antiques that recall the city’s heyday as a well-to-do independent republic during the Renaissance. Luckily, this Old-World city also has a few modern retreats tucked away along its canals, as well as discrete country homes and family-run pensione a short vaporetto ride from the major attractions and museums. Of course, there are also budget-busting options for those hoping to book a stay like true Italian aristocracy (as well as budget-friendly, cheap hotel options). Regardless of the style, with only so much space and serious restrictions on any new construction, accommodation in La Serenissima is at a serious premium and should be booked as far in advance as possible. Here are some of the best hotels to help you decide where to stay in Venice.

The 21 best things to do in Italy

The 21 best things to do in Italy

Come to the boot for the god-level pasta, stay to explore the best things to do in Italy: from an exploration of the heavenly landscape (snow-capped mountains of the Alps! Crystal clear Mediterranean waters!) to world-class museums. Here, you can scuba dive to see ancient ruins, hire a vintage car for a Tuscan road trip (stopping off in Florence, of course) or raise a spritz above the rooftops of Rome. Whether you’re visiting a quaint country town or a bustling urban sprawl, you'll fall in love with Italy, we promise. The best part? Hotels and distances mean you're always a short ride away from a change of scenery that will delight you. Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList and tag @TimeOutEverywhere. Find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world.

The 10 best museums in Venice

The 10 best museums in Venice

Venice has no shortage of palaces-turned-museums thanks to its prosperous past as a wealthy trade center from medieval times through the Renaissance. The stately marble palazzi that line the Grand Canal are basically works of art themselves, filled with antiquities and hand painted frescoes by some of Italy’s greatest masters.  But this city of waterside mansions and picturesque canals has more to offer than Baroque architecture and gilded attractions. Every two years, the canals and historic buildings of La Serenissima become the backdrop to La Biennale—one of the most prestigious and forward thinking events in the contemporary art world, and by far one of the best things to do in Venice. From galleries filled with modern masterpieces, artisan craftsmanship and historic palaces, here are the best museums in Venice.

10 incredible cheap hotels in Rome

10 incredible cheap hotels in Rome

Living la dolce vita does not always come cheap: there are Vespas to rent, attractions to explore, Negronis to imbibe at the best bars in Rome and truffle-topped pasta to eat. Prioritising cheap hotels in Rome without sacrificing any iconic Italian style will free up more funds for the tasty and cultural temptations around every corner. And luckily some of the city’s best hotels are also its most budget-friendly; finding cheap acommodations does not require being stuck in some soulless suburb. From art nouveau villas turned B&Bs in chic Parioli to tech-smart rooms near the Pantheon or former palaces on the edge of Piazza Navona, here are the top ten cheap hotels in Rome.

The 10 most Instagrammable places in Rome

The 10 most Instagrammable places in Rome

Crumbling ruins, iconic  attractions and cobblestones for days—a walk through Rome can feel like stepping onto a movie set. The picture-perfect city almost feels like it was made for Instagram, because there is a photo-worthy thing to do (and a selfie stick seller) around practically every corner.  From mornings at the market to jaw-dropping city views, charming side streets and bucket-list-ticking monuments to a photogenic dinner at one of the city’s top restaurants, bella Roma has everything you need to bring your social media A-game. To ensure that your followers are suitably jealous of your new #dolcevita lifestyle, we’ve rounded up the most Instagrammable places in Rome. Just be sure to put your phone down while Vespa-ing. The top of St. Peter’s Basilica  A post shared by Alyssa🍍 (@alyssamramirez) on Nov 25, 2014 at 12:51pm PST Rome may have more than 900 churches, but it’s St. Peter's Basilica that reigns supreme among them. The Vatican's basilica is the largest and most opulent church in all of Italy. A list of the artists who helped create the magnificent structure reads like a who’s who of the Renaissance. Inside you will find Michelangelo's Pieta, Bernini’s lavish bronze altar piece and Bramante's distinctive window-lined dome. It’s hard to know what to post to Insta-stories first because every inch of the massive church seems to be covered in marble or gold. The exterior of the building is no slouch either, with the square on which its sits surrounded by

Listings and reviews (26)

Trattoria Da Danilo

Trattoria Da Danilo

Trattoria Da Danilo’s carbonara is considered one of the best in the city because it is topped with perfectly crisped bacon instead of only guanciale (a cured pork jowl). Located just off the highest of Rome’s seven hills, the Esquilino restaurant is popular with locals because it lies outside of the most heavily trafficked parts of the city. The cozy trattoria serves fantastic pastas, all of which can be paired with one of the more than 200 bottles off the impressive wine list. Time Out tip: Carbonara is the signature dish at this restaurant, but for a tableside show its best to order the cacio e pepe which is quickly prepared on a small cart before being served piping hot.

Checchino dal 1887

Checchino dal 1887

Located across the street from the entrance to the old slaughterhouse (ex-mattataio), Checchino dal 1887 has specialized in offal for more than one hundred years. Once a working-class eatery, the white table-clothed restaurant has evolved into a more sophisticated destination, with jacketed waiters navigating the old-school dining room with a wine trolley. Despite its current upscale air, Checchino still specializes in the “fifth quarter” of the animal and serves a full offal tasting menu so you can sample all the leftover bits transformed into long-stewed Roman classics.  Time Out tip: End your meal with a cheese course, which will be wheeled out on a cart with a flourish to show off the Sicilian cheese that incorporates saffron and pepper or local caciofiore made with wild thistle.

Pizzeria Ai Marmi

Pizzeria Ai Marmi

Ai Marmi is a lively traditional Roman pizzeria filled with long marble tables (marmi means “marble” in Italian) that are pushed together in rows to accommodate the crowds that flock to this Trastevere institution for crispy thin pizza. Find a table to the left of the dining room as you enter in order to have a better view of the pizzas being expertly slipped into the wood fire oven. Once seated, give in to the old-school typography advertising supplí al telefono and order the fried rice and mozzarella balls to enjoy as a pre-pizza appetizer. Time Out tip: Don’t even think about splitting a pizza here! One pie per person please, but trading slices is totally acceptable.

Pasticceria Regoli

Pasticceria Regoli

For a local breakfast, shimmy your way up to the bar of Pasticceria Regoli. Just a few minutes from the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore, the Esquilino pastry shop turned 100 in 2016 and still manages to do brisk trade in cakes and sweet baked goods of all types. Regoli is most famous for its cream-filled maritozzi buns, but the tartlets topped with custard wild strawberries from the nearby town of Nemi are also major crowd pleasers. Time Out tip: The maritozzi con la panna (with cream) are considered some of the city’s best, but you’ll soon see why Regoli’s bar is decorated with so many mirrors. The buns are so liberally stuffed with whipped cream that it is nearly impossible to eat the pastry without smearing some on your face. Do a quick check for stray panna before heading out the doors.

Supplizio

Supplizio

Supplizio has mastered the art of fried foods. Selling nothing but supplì and croquettes, the tiny shop turns out fresh fritti on a charming cobblestone lane in the heart of Rome. Not to be satisfied with a simple marinara and mozzarella stuffed risotto ball, Supplizio serves the fried treats in flavors inspired by Rome’s best pasta dishes—carbonara, arrabbiatta (spicy tomato) and cacio e pepe (cheese and pepper). Beer and wine are also available to wash it all down with, but in matching the street food inspired cuisine, seating is extremely limited. Time Out tip: The shop is decorated with matchbook cars because chef Arcangelo Dandini (who also runs L’Arcangelo by the Vatican) strives to recreate the flavors he remembers from his childhood.

Nonna Betta

Nonna Betta

A distinctive Roman-Jewish cuisine arose in Rome because of a Papal edict that established an isolated Ghetto next to the Tiber river in 1555. Today, the area known as the Quartiere Ebraico is an exclusive enclave filled with traditional kosher restaurants like Nonna Betta. Decorated with painted scenes of neighborhood life in the 1800s, the eatery is named for the owner’s grandmother and stays true to its home cooking origins. The fried artichokes are outstanding, as is the gricia alla giudea which uses artichokes instead of bacon to create a kosher version of the typical Roman pasta.  

Felice a Testaccio

Felice a Testaccio

With a balance of upscale service and traditional dishes, Felice a Testaccio is often described as one of Rome’s best restaurants. Despite its elegant appearance, the restaurant is best known for its humbler dishes that evolved thanks to the slaughterhouse history of the Testaccio neighborhood in which it is found. The meat courses, including coda alla vaccinara (oxtail braised in tomato sauce) and veal saltimbocca, are particularly tasty. The restaurant wears its prestige well, but expect prices to be slightly higher than at nearby eateries. Time Out tip: The waiters tend to upsell the menu, but listen when they suggest peaches in white wine for dessert.

The Jerry Thomas Project

The Jerry Thomas Project

There is no shortage of pilgrims making their way through Rome en route to the Vatican, but serious drinkers prefer to worship at the temple of Jerry Thomas. Dimly lit and hazy with cigarette smoke, The Jerry Thomas Project set off the city’s speakeasy craze and has easily remained at the top of Rome’s growing list of member’s only watering holes. Gaining entrance to the incredibly popular private bar requires a €5 membership fee, a quick look at their website to learn the daily password and an advanced booking. The over-the-top admission procedures are reflective of the atmosphere, where the booze is custom, vodka is banned and presentation is just as important as quality ingredients. The speakeasy executes each cocktail with totally unique homemade cordials and a keen attention to detail that keeps the tables perpetually full. Time Out tip: No joke, the Jerry Thomas Project has a list of ten rules that thou shalt not break if you want to drink inside the in-demand bar.

Ma Che Siete Venuti a Fà

Ma Che Siete Venuti a Fà

“Hole in the wall” would be a generous description for this galley-like craft beer bar in Rome’s popular Trastevere neighborhood. The complicated name (shortened to “makke” for regulars) essentially translates to: “but what did you come here to do?!” Obviously, you came to drink the most discerning selection of craft beer in the city. The tiny pub is narrow and popular, so you’re likely to see bearded beer aficionados spilling out of the door with pint glasses in hand. But what Ma Che Siete Venuti a Fà lacks in space, it makes up for with major beer credentials and a laid-back vibe that makes you want to lean up against the wall outside with another round. The selection changes regularly, and features craft breweries that are predominately Italian, with other international microbrews occasionally sneaking into the rotation. Time Out tip: The barstools are few and far between, so pints are best enjoyed on the cobblestone lane outside the pub’s front door.

Litro

Litro

Situated above Trastevere in a residential area called Monteverde, Litro is the perfect place for classy day drinking. The bar is also open at night but is clearly at its best during the afternoon and early evening when warm Roman light fills the cool dining room and relaxed outdoor patio. Not only does Litro have one of the best selections of natural wine in the city, the bar also boasts a fantastic cocktail menu with classics such as a flawless Hugo (elderflower cordial, prosecco and mint), as well as an extensive list of mescal-based mixed drinks. There is no need to drink it all on an empty stomach—Litro’s small but refined menu has everything from salmon sashimi to butter and anchovy bruschetta, as well as seasonal salads and sandwiches. Because the location is a bit outside of central Rome, the bar tends to have low-key locals only vibe that is ideal for lingering over a bottle of wine. Time Out tip: Snagging a table outside can be difficult during the warmer months, but reservations are available if you agree to order food to go along with your booze.

Bar San Calisto

Bar San Calisto

Situated just around the corner from Trastevere's main square, Bar San Calisto’s patio tables are full nearly every hour of the day. The dive-y bar is more retro coffee shop than cocktail lounge, and has long been one of Rome’s most popular bohemian hangouts. The drinking joint is a real gem thanks to its outdoor seating and dirt cheap booze, the combination of which makes for great people watching. Some of the regulars look a little worse for wear, but the crowd is rounded out with a good mix of students and local intellectuals, most of whom choose to nurse large bottles of €3 Peroni while arguing over soccer predictions. Time Out tip: Don’t expect any menus or table service at Bar San Calisto. Head inside to pay at the cash register, then take your receipt to the bar in order to redeem your drink.

Black Market Monti

Black Market Monti

Bursting with vintage sofas and original artwork, BlackMarket in Monti feels like walking into your much cooler friend’s awesome basement apartment. The bar is perfectly at home in the increasingly trendy neighborhood, but manages to avoid feeling artificial or pretentious. Instead, the multiple rooms and mix of furnishings make for an intimate setting for a few drinks and conversation. The space also often hosts temporary exhibits and is one of the best bars in the area to catch a live show. The menu of beer, wine and typical cocktails is adequate, but the cozy atmosphere and eclectic music performances are really what make this one of the city’s best places to drink. Time Out tip: Go full Roman hipster by ordering the vegan burger to pair with Blackmarket’s own signature IPA from a local microbrewery.