Get us in your inbox

Howard Halle

Howard Halle

Howard Halle is Time Out's former New York Staff Writer, Culture.

Articles (156)

The best art classes in NYC

The best art classes in NYC

There are very few cities with the amount of incredible art that NYC has to offer. New York has the single largest concentration of galleries anywhere for one thing, and for another, has some of the finest museums in the world. And it's no surprise that being surrounded by such artistic wonders will spark a few creatives among you.  We say, go for it and channel your inner artiste. Why spend all of your time just looking at works of art, or taking selfies with them, when you can discover your inner Picasso or Van Gogh? We have just the list you need to find the best art classes in NYC for every taste and technique, from painting and sculpture to ceramics and silk-screen printing. RECOMMENDED: Find more classes in NYC

All the free museums days in NYC you should know about

All the free museums days in NYC you should know about

Free and cheap tickets to NYC's best museums? It's possible! One of the benefits of living in or visiting New York City is all the incredible cultural institutions and museums are at your beck-and-call like The Metropolitan Museum Of Art, MoMA or the Guggenheim. They are among the finest in the world—there’s just one hitch: They’re often pricey to get into. Unlike cities such as London or Washington, D.C., New York isn’t big on publicly funded museums, which is too bad, especially if you actually live here and have to pay most of your wages on food and rent. Granted, there are senior and student discounts, and memberships that let you get in gratis if you’re willing to pay for the annual fee. There is one alternative, however: most museums offer free hours or days and pay-what-you-wish admission. You just have to know where and when they are. We’ve got the info you need in our guide to all the free museum days and cheap admission in NYC you should know about. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best museums in NYC

The best photography classes in NYC

The best photography classes in NYC

Nowadays, you'll see almost everyone on the streets with their phones out, thinking they're professional photographers, trying to capture the perfect foodie pic or landmark landscape. No shade though, smartphone cameras are pretty good when it comes to photo quality, and many of us are talented enough to get a great shot - even if we use filters that fix everything. NYC is a photographer's dream. Whether it’s iconic buildings, stunning city views, beautiful churches, pretty parks or even incredible dishes and cocktails at the best restaurants and best bars in the city, you can get great shots of them all to share on social media. But for those who want to learn how to really capture the best pics, here are the best photography classes in NYC to get you started. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to classes in NYC

The best interactive museums in NYC

The best interactive museums in NYC

The Metropolitan Museum, MoMA, the Guggenheim—we all love these museums, sure, but let’s face it: Once you get to any one of them, you mostly stand around and look at things. And when you’re not doing that, you’re reading wall labels. Not that there’s anything wrong with that! But sometimes you might want something with a little more action, something a little more…interactive. Luckily, this is New York City, which has just about everything, including museums that allow you to involve yourself with the displays. At some places, this means taking exhibitions augmented with audio-visual interfaces; at other locations, it means finding yourself in a fully immersive installation with the latest digital technologies like VR. Either way, if you’re looking for ways to heighten your museum-going experience, we’ve got recommendations for you in our list of the best interactive museums in NYC.   RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best New York attractions

The top art museums in NYC

The top art museums in NYC

When it comes to art museums, New York City suffers from an embarrassment of riches, with some of the greatest institutions in the world located right here in Gotham. Among them: The Metropolitan Museum Of Art, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum—the big three of NYC art museums. Each is an iconic destination that draws millions of visitors from all over the globe, and it’s easy to see why. The Metropolitan Museum, for example, houses 5,000 years of art, with everything from Ancient Egyptian and Greco-Roman treasures to Renaissance and Impressionist masterpieces. The Met even has fabulous holdings of modern and contemporary objects, though, admittedly, MoMA is the go-to place on that score with what is arguably the most comprehensive collection of 20th- and 21st-century art in the world. The Guggenheim is no slouch when showcasing modern artworks as well, especially its hoard of abstract paintings by Wassily Kandinsky. But the icing on the cake remains the Gugg’s nautilus-shaped home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. With its breathtaking interior rotunda, the Guggenheim is Wright’s only major building here, making it one of the most important structures in New York, if not the entire world. Yet as amazing as they are, The Met, the Modern and the Guggenheim represent only the tip of the iceberg, as NYC boasts dozens more art museums, spread across the Five Boroughs—including must-see destinations in Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx. They all have

The best butts at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The best butts at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Ah, The Metropolitan Museum of Art! Sitting on Fifth Avenue next to Central Park, The Met is the stolid anchor of NYC's Museum Mile. Tens of thousands of visitors flock to its magisterial galleries to take in 5,000 years of art-historical treasures. But do you know what else is on view that’s often overlooked? Butts! All kinds of butts: Female butts, male butts, tight butts, fat butts—and also phat butts. As a service to readers who may not be totally aware of The Met's bum-per crop of buns, Time Out New York offers it select guide to The best butts at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to best art museums

New York’s off-beat museums

New York’s off-beat museums

New York boasts the most prestigious cultural institutions in the world, so it’s easy to understand why tourists and even local museums lovers might not realize that there’s a lot more destinations to visit than just The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim or MoMA. Those are of course, amazing places, but if you’re looking for something more off-beat, you should know the NYC hosts a whole ecology of smaller, niche museums with idiosyncratic offerings related to mathematics, magic and even elevators. Where can you find them? Why right here in our authoritative list of New York’s quirkiest museums. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to museums in NYC

The best Brooklyn art galleries

The best Brooklyn art galleries

Brooklyn is full of artists (at least until they get priced out by rising rents), so it only stands to reason that the Borough of Kings is also full of art galleries. And in fact, you can find gallery spaces in just about every neighborhood from Greenpoint and Bushwick to Red Hook and beyond, these venues couldn’t be any more different from Chelsea’s mega-galleries, though they do share the funky vibe of the Lower East Side’s gallery scene. Want to know more? Then check out our guide to the best Brooklyn art galleries.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best art galleries in NYC

The most famous paintings of all time

The most famous paintings of all time

Ranking the most famous paintings of all time is a difficult task. Painting is an ancient medium and even with the introduction of photography, film and digital technology, it still has remained a persistent mode of expression. So many paintings have been limned over dozens of millennia that only a relatively small percentage of them could be construed as "timeless classics" that have become familiar to the public—and not coincidentally produced by some of the most famous artists of all time. It leaves open the question of what mix of talent, genius and circumstance leads to the creation of a masterpiece. Perhaps the simplest answer is that you know one when you see one, whether it's at one of NYC's many museums (The Metropolitan Museum, the Guggenheim, MoMA and elsewhere) or at institutions in other parts of the world. We, of course, have our opinion of what makes the grade and we present them here in our list of the best paintings of all time.

The best art walks in NYC

The best art walks in NYC

NYC is a top destination for viewing visual art, from world class art museums—including The Metropolitan Museum Of Art, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum—that display some of the best artists spanning centuries to mind-blowing outdoor art and sculpture. To catch a glimpse of the current and cutting edge in the art world, New York’s legendary art galleries are not to be missed. Though there are well over 1,000 art galleries in the city, they’re concentrated in areas like Chelsea and the Lower East Side, making it easy to get your fill by tackling these recommended art walks in NYC. The best art walks in NYC will take you to iconic galleries that showcase major artists as well as up-and-comers making their mark in the world of art and design. View works from the likes of Andy Warhol, Damien Hirst, Yayoi Kusama and Richard Serra as well as artists who are bound to be big names too. These galleries feature painting, sculpture and installations that are sure to impress. And while you may not be able to make a purchase, these galleries are free to visit. So lace up your shoes, get moving and check out these amazing NYC art walks.

The most famous artists of all time

The most famous artists of all time

How do you choose the most famous artists of all time? Art can be hard to define in the first place, perhaps it’s in the eye of the beholder, but there is a general consensus which artists have made (and are currently making) a lasting impact on their respective mediums. Whether you’re an art lover or not, you should know these artists for their achievements and their famous works of art. From iconic paintings to famous sculptures, these artists have produced works that stand the test of time. The works of many of these famous artists can be seen at museums around New York, like The Met, MoMA and the Guggenheim. It’s an amazing experience when you see a work of art by Da Vinci, Degas, Warhol, Pollak or Kusama in person. If you’re inspired by this list of amazing artists, explore the best art galleries in NYC to see artists who are on their way to becoming famous or take an art class and you might discover a talented artist within.

The top famous sculptures of all time

The top famous sculptures of all time

Unlike a painting, sculpture is three dimensional art, allowing you to view a piece from all angles. Whether celebrating an historic figure or created as a work of art, sculpture is all the more powerful due to its physical presence. The top famous sculptures of all time are instantly recognizable, created by artists spanning centuries and in mediums ranging from marble to metal. Like street art, some works of sculpture are big, bold and unmissable. Other examples of sculpture may be delicate, requiring close study. Right here in NYC, you can view important pieces in Central Park, housed in museums like The Met, MoMA or the Guggenheim, or as public works of outdoor art. Most of these famous sculptures can be identified by even the most casual viewer. From Michaelangelo’s David to Warhol’s Brillo Box, these iconic sculptures are defining works of both their eras and their creators. Photos won’t do these sculptures justice, so any fan of these works should aim to see them in person for full effect.

Listings and reviews (35)

Spring/Break Art Show

Spring/Break Art Show

Launched in 2011, this scrappy fair sets itself apart by having outside curators select the artists. Also, the shows are mounted in unconventional locations: Previous editions have set up shop in the Cathedral School of Old Saint Patrick’s in Nolita and at the former James A. Farley Post Office across from Madison Square Garden. This year’s 10th-anniversary event takes place September 8-12 (11am-8pm daily) in the former offices of Ralph Lauren’s headquarters at 625 Madison Avenue with  130 curatorial projects, 150 curators and 400+ artists, which will come together for the theme, “NAKED LUNCH.”

Art on Paper

Art on Paper

As its name implies, this fair is devoted to works (drawings, prints, photos, mixed-media) on paper, but not just on paper: The offerings include inventive three-dimensional sculptures and installations made out of paper. As the latter suggests, Art on Paper is dedicated to pushing the envelope on one of art’s oldest mediums. This year, 100 galleries will showcase work at Pier 36. This year will again highlight some incredibly innovative paper-based programming, including a program of public works all created by women, including:

Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

UPDATE: Make sure to check for changes in its reopening plan here. After three years of planning and construction—including a four-month closure this summer—the Museum of Modern Art has finally thrown open its doors to a shiny, reconfigured self, offering the public more MoMA to love (or at least to ponder) than ever. The massive expansion brings the institution’s total size to a whopping 708,000 square feet, 166,000 of which are dedicated to exhibition space. But the biggest deal is MoMA’s remix of its vaunted holdings: After decades of promoting promoting Picasso, Matisse, Pollock and other great white males, The Modern has dusted off works from women and artists of color that had been languishing in storage. Proclaiming a new woke MoMA, the museum has shifted to a multicultural reconsideration of 20th- and 21st-century art. But don't worry: You can still find works by fan favorites like Matisse. 

Skyline Drive-In

Skyline Drive-In

A new drive-in has opened in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, offering "killer views of Manhattan's skyline" along with popular movie classics. Skyline Drive-In operates on a site that’s been used for shooting Fendi and Converse ads as well as the opening credits of Saturday Night Live. All ages. 

Meow Wolf, House of Eternal Return

Meow Wolf, House of Eternal Return

This immersive-slash-interactive art installation-slash-experience is the creation of Meow Wolf, an arts and entertainment group founded in in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 2008. Opened in 2016 with the support of Game of Thrones creator, George R.R. Martin, House of Eternal Return is described as a "multidimensional mystery house with secret passages, portals to magical worlds, and an expansive narrative amidst surreal, maximalist, and mesmerizing art exhibits." While the outside of house seems normal, the inside offers tons of psychedelic fun, beginning with an ordinary kitchen with an equally ordinary fridge. Open its door and step inside to a trippy tour that takes you through a series of rooms ranging from an alien-looking cavern to a dreamlike forest fit for faries and elves. There's also a learning center for kids, a bar and a venue for live music. House of Eternal Return is scheduled to be joined by similarly mind-blowing outposts in Las Vegas and Denver.

Elizabeth Dee Gallery

Elizabeth Dee Gallery

Elizabeth Dee, the feisty owner of this gallery, opened her space in 2002 in Chelsea with a roster of fiercely Conceptual artists devoted to "philosophical inquiry as a platform." In 2016 she relocated to a bigger space uptown in Harlem, continuing a trend of galleries moving into that neighborhood.    

“Markus Lüpertz: New Paintings”

“Markus Lüpertz: New Paintings”

Known for his outspokenness and dandyish attire, Markus Lüpertz is a member in good standing of the Neo-Expressionist movement that emerged in Germany during the mid-postwar era. Still, while he has exhibited here frequently, he’s not as well known on this side of the Atlantic as his contemporaries Georg Baselitz and Anselm Kiefer. Now 76, Lüpertz gained notoriety for a series of canvases that delved into Germany’s Nazi past, with images of helmets and officers’ uniforms. But he’s also had a long-held fascination for mythological and pastoral themes from classical antiquity, an interest indulged in this show of new paintings. On view are scenes of nudes, male and female, posing within unspoiled settings of trees, fields and streams. In a couple of cases, the subjects are obtrusively crowded by blown-up platters of grapes or intruded upon by colossal sculptural heads. Elsewhere, horse bodies couple with figures to form centaurs. All of these subjects are painted in a moody palette of earth colors applied with broad, rough strokes; in one piece, for instance, a bluish-hued rendition of Narcissus is laid over a schematic sketch of a skeleton. For all its rugged texture, Lüpertz’s work put me in mind of Nicolas Poussin’s finely grained 1637–38 masterpiece, Et in Arcadia ego. In it, shepherds pause in a sylvan grove to inspect the titular inscription on a stone block, a phrase that translates into, “Even in Arcadia, there am I.” The “I” is generally interpreted to mean Death, who

White Columns

White Columns

The history of this non-profit art center stretches back to the artist paradise that was late-’60s, early-’70s Soho, where cheap rents and abundant loft space permitted ambitious, experimental work freed from the money-making constraints of the art market. 112 Workshop/112 Greene Street as it was originally known was founded in 1970 by artists Jeffrey Lew and Gordon Matta-Clark and set the template for alternative spaces across the country. Renamed White Columns nine years later, the gallery remained in Soho at various addresses until rising rents forced a move to the West Village in the 1990s. It’s been at its current location near the border of MePA since 1998 and continues its long-established mission of showcasing cutting-edge art.

Alexander and Bonin

Alexander and Bonin

Partners Carolyn Alexander and Ted Bonin launched their venture in 1995 and in the more than 20 years since migrated from Soho to Chelsea and then to their current location on Walker Street in Tribeca. They present shows of such mid-career artists as John Ahearn, Willie Cole and Mona Hatoum.

The Drawing Center

The Drawing Center

As it names suggests, The Drawing Center is devoted to exhibiting and promoting works on paper, both historical and contemporary. A Soho stalwart since its founding in 1977, The Drawing Center is as much a museum as it is a gallery (there’s a five dollar admission), but its wooden floors and cast-iron columns are reminiscent of Soho’s glory days as a gallery district.

Greenspon

Greenspon

Dealer Amy Greenspon opened this space in 2010 with then partner Mitchell Algus, a dealer known for reviving the reputations of long-forgotten artists notable for their eccentric work. They subsequently parted company and Greenspon now runs the operation on her own, representing a stable of contemporary artists—Austé, E’wao Kagoshima and Emily Sundblad, to name a few—who display their own idiosyncrasies in a variety of ways.

Postmasters Gallery

Postmasters Gallery

This gallery has always gone to the beat of its own drum, with a history going back more than 30 years to the heyday of the now-vanished East Village Gallery scene. After sojourns in Soho and Chelsea, the gallery landed on Franklin Street in Tribeca in 2013. But for all of its peregrinations, Postmasters has stuck to a program that doesn’t always go with the commercial flow. So-called net artists working online and political activists, make up part of a stable that includes veterans (David Diao; Wolfgang Staehle) and emerging artists (Nidaa Badwan; Austin Lee).

News (566)

These dreamy renderings show what New York would look like without cars

These dreamy renderings show what New York would look like without cars

Except for occasional spates of speeding and drag-racing, the streets of New York City have been pretty quiet during the pandemic, thanks to a corresponding drop in traffic. And even as people stayed home, Mayor De Blasio closed off 23 miles of NYC streets to automobiles. These developments have led designers and urban planners to start imagining a car-free future for NYC once the current crisis passes. In fact, there have been proposals put forth to turn the Brooklyn Bridge into something more akin to the High Line; now, architect Vishaan Chakrabarti and his firm, Practice for Architecture and Urbanism (PAU), has released plans to greatly reduce the number of individually-owned cars entering Manhattan, while refashioning streets to cede space to pedestrians and bikes. PAU calls the project “N.Y.C. (Not Your Car),” and it is nothing if not ambitious. Besides restricting private motor vehicles and curbside parking, the program would enlarge sidewalks, replace car lanes with two-way bike paths protected by concrete barriers, increase dedicated bus lanes, create a new greenway along FDR Drive that would connect to the one on the West Side Highway, and dedicate more room on the Manhattan Bridge to ride-shares, buses, pedestrians and bikers. Whether or not any of this becomes reality remains an open question, but in the meantime, you can check out how PAU envisions the city with fewer cars in these before and after images. Park Avenue, Upper East Side:   Photograph: Courtesy PAU

New York’s getting 20 new miles of bus lanes

New York’s getting 20 new miles of bus lanes

We're in day two of NYC's Phase 1 re-opening, and along with substantial changes in subway service, Mayor Bill De Blasio has just announced a major expansion of the city's busway program. The plan would create 20 more miles of car-free corridors in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens, and though it falls far short of the MTA's call to add 60 more miles, the mayor told Streetsblog that it was "a major step." You may recall that back in July of 2018, when anger over the L train shutdown reached fever pitch, the mayor announced plans for an express busway along 14th Street as a way of accommodating some of the 275,000 straphangers that were being affected by the suspension of L train service. From 6am to 10pm daily, cars (though not trucks, emergency vehicles or for-hire vehicles picking up or dropping off passengers provided they took the next right turn) were banned from traveling along 14th Street between Third and Ninth Avenues. Lawsuits by nearby residents and block associations delayed implementation of the program, but when it was finally cleared the courts, an 18-month pilot program began in October of 2019. It proved to be an instance success: What had once been one of the city's slowest bus routes became one of its fastest. The mayor also said that he was making the 14th Street busway permanent and extending it to Avenue C. “As New Yorkers head back to work, they’ll be relying on the bus more than ever, and I’m proud to offer them faster and more reliable options,” he said.

An Upstate art installation lets visitors commune with hummingbirds

An Upstate art installation lets visitors commune with hummingbirds

Hummingbirds are nature's helicopters, buzzing and hovering around flowers in a way that seems impossible for an animal. But that is why we're fascinated with them. They're hard to find in the city, though if you hang a hummingbird feeder outside your window between late March and early April, you may attract some of them on their annual migration across the region. However, if you want to increase your chances of seeing one, we recommend making a weekend getaway to the Thomas Cole National Historic Site in Catskill, NY. There, you'll find Pollinator Pavilion, an interactive outdoor art installation by artists Mark Dion and Dana Sherwood, which is described as a "fantastical architectural setting that offers miraculous moments in which individuals can encounter hummingbirds."   Photograph: Courtesy the artists   Pollinator Pavilion is a 21 ½-foot-high, painted wood, architectural confection draped with flowers, plants, and paintings by the artists. It's designed to attract hummingbirds, allowing you to meditate on their essential role a pollinators of flowers and plants. The structure itself resembles something out of the Victorian Era, which seems only appropriate: Cole, whose house and studio occupies the site, was one of the leading painters of the Hudson River School during that period. His work is in collection of The Metropolitan Museum Of Art, but he's probably best known to New Yorkers for "The Course of Empire" a series of paintings at the New-York Historical Socie

This citywide art installation is displaying timely new works all over NYC

This citywide art installation is displaying timely new works all over NYC

Just as New Yorkers were eagerly anticipating the city's Phase 3 reopening, the coronavirus has come roaring back in places like Texas, Florida and California—threatening to undo all the work involved in flattening the Covid curve in New York. The pandemic, it seems, hasn't gone anywhere—and, neither for that matter, has its larger impact on society. It's against this backdrop that the Public Art Fund is mounting its latest project, "Art on the Grid." The rather abstract-sounding title belies the timely nature of the show, which presents works by 50 emerging artist on bus shelters and LinkNYC kiosks throughout the Five Boroughs. Each installation will offer a different take on just how much everything has changed in four short months. According to the Public Art Fund (which recently unveiled a major public art initiative for the new Terminal B at LaGuardia Airport), "Art on the Grid" is conceived as a "direct response to the COVID-19 pandemic," as well as to the "parallel epidemic of systemic racism." The artists are touching on themes such as "healing and loss; community and isolation; intimacy and solitude; and the creation of a future that is more just, inclusive and equitable." This isn't the first time the Public Art Fund has used bus shelters, and "Art on the Grid" employs 500 of them, plus an additional 1,700 LinkNYC kiosks. Works by ten artists are already on view at 100 sites, while an additional 40 artworks on 400 bus shelters will be unveiled on July 27. The projec

See what's coming to Astoria's Socrates Sculpture Park this summer

See what's coming to Astoria's Socrates Sculpture Park this summer

Since NYC went into lockdown, it's been strange days for New York's art world, with gallery exhibits limited to online viewing rooms and museums confined to offering virtual tours. But now, with the prospect of the city slowly beginning to lift the quarantine, all of that may change. Indeed, you might say an upcoming exhibition slated for Queens's Socrates Sculpture Park is a harbinger of things to come. Remarkably, the outdoor art showcase in Long Island City has been opened all of this time, because, well, it's a park. However, Socrates was only showing works installed before the crisis. Now, it's is making up for lost time with a new exhibition series, under the rubric, "Monuments Now," that will take place over the summer and fall. It kicks of with a trio of artists—Jeffrey Gibson, Paul Ramírez Jonas and Xaviera Simmons—presenting large-scale objects that take the premise literally. Gibson's piece, for example, consists of 40ft x 40ft plywood ziggurat inspired by the pre-Columbian earthen mounds created by indigenous people in the Mississippi Valley during the 13th century. It will be covered in a skein of brightly-colored geometric patterns.   Jeffrey Gibson, 'Because Once You Enter My House It Becomes Our House'Photograph: Courtesy Jeffrey Gibson/Socrates Sculpture Park/Scott Lynch   Ramírez Jonas, meanwhile, is creating a functional community grill in the form of towering obelisk.   Photograph: Courtesy the artist and Socrates Sculpture Park   Finally, Simmons's bo

This giant new NYC street mural offers an interactive experience

This giant new NYC street mural offers an interactive experience

One of the biggest names in street art, the French artist who goes by the initials JR, has been very busy of late, especially in the Borough Of Kings. He was the subject of a recent, major exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, and as part of that show, he created a massive outdoor photo-mural mounted on a tower of shipping containers stacked on top of each other like giant Jenga blocks. Titled The Chronicles of New York City, it depicted a cityscape filled with more than 1000 real New Yorkers (including Robert De Niro!) who posed for the artist in a mobile studio: A 53-foot-long trailer truck which tooled around NYC in the summer of 2018 looking for passersby willing to have their picture taken.   Photograph: Courtesy Brooklyn Museum/Marc Azoulay/JR-ART.NET           Now, a large detail of that same piece has been installed on the side of the 80 Hanson Arts building in Downtown Brooklyn's cultural district, and it comes with a special interactive feature: An augmented reality function that allows you to point your phone at any specific individual in the image and hear their back story by downloading a free app (JR murals).   Photograph: Courtesy Brooklyn Museum/Marc Azoulay/JR-ART.NET                  

Upstate art destination Dia Beacon has officially announced a reopening date

Upstate art destination Dia Beacon has officially announced a reopening date

Like New York City's major art museums, Dia Beacon in Dutchess County, long a favorite destination for weekend getaways, has been closed since the onset of the pandemic. Now, it's announced that it will be reopening on August 7. As you might expect, social distancing measures will be in place. Hours will be reduced, as will the number of visitors at one time; face masks and advanced reservations will be also required, along with time tickets (which you can purchase here starting August 3). In addition to its permanent collection and long-term exhibitions of works by artists such as Andy Warhol, Gerhard Richter and Richard Serra, the contemporary art showcase located at the old Nabisco plant in Beacon, NY, is also featuring a sound installation by acclaimed Detroit-based techno DJ and producer Carl Craig.   Photograph: Bill Jacobson Studio, New York, courtesy Dia Art Foundation, New York   Meanwhile, Dia's location in the Hamptons—a repurposed firehouse in Bridgehampton, NY—is already re-opened with a yearlong installation of new work by the Conceptual artist, writer and filmmaker Jill Magid. The show is open on Saturdays and Sundays, and face masks are required. Visitors are being restricted to eight at a time. Most popular on Time Out - The 9 best streets for outdoor dining in NYC this summer- 13 hidden patios, backyards and gardens for outdoor dining in NYC- The 50 best family movies to watch together- The Metropolitan Opera streams a different free production every night

A duck is nesting on the Metropolitan Museum's roof garden

A duck is nesting on the Metropolitan Museum's roof garden

While tourists may have flown the coop at The Metropolitan Museum of Art for obvious reason, one hardy soul has decided to drop in for an extended stay: A female brown duck has built her nest in a planter on the The Met's Cantor Rooftop Garden. Ordinarily a showcase for outdoor art installations by today's leading contemporary artists, the roof has now been repurposed as an anatine nursery. View this post on Instagram 📣 DUCK ALERT 📣 ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ There's a quacker on the #CantorRoof! This mama bird has decided that The Met's rooftop fits the bill for a prime nesting spot. 🦆 🐣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Met staff are keeping an eye on our feathered friend and have enlisted the help of @nycparks Urban Park Rangers to assist in transporting mama and her ducklings to the Central Park pond when they're ready to make a move.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ In the meantime, we're falling in love and searching for the perfect name for our sweet little lady. ⬇️ Drop your most egg-cellent name suggestions in the comments below. (Extra points if they're art-themed!) ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ [Image descriptions: A brown duck nests comfortably in a planter on The Met's roof. An alternate angle of the same duck nesting amidst bright green foliage.] A post shared by The Metropolitan Museum of Art (@metmuseum) on Jul 24, 2020 at 8:04am PDT A photo of the duck has been posted on The Met's Instagram account, along with a message speculating that the bird must have decided on The Met's roof as the place to lay her eggs because it "fits the bill." W

You can now take a canoe tour of the Gowanus Canal

You can now take a canoe tour of the Gowanus Canal

Have you ever considered boating down the Gowanus Canal? Yeah, that Gowanus Canal. Famed for its “black mayonnaise,” the waterway nicknamed lavender lake seems like an unlikely destination for such an expedition, and admittedly, the idea sounds as crazy as swimming there, but people have done it. (In fact, they’ve have done both.) If you’re so inclined, however, we’ve got good news: Untapped New York is now offering canoe tours of the canal. Sponsored in concert with The Gowanus Dredgers, a volunteer group dedicated to providing access to and education about the canal since 1999, the excursion is described as a “a secret, one of a kind, personal sunset cruise,” which will set sail for two excursions on August 13 and August 18 at 7pm. You’ll be outfitted with life vests that have been sanitized and isolated for at least 72 hours before use, and wearing masks and other social distancing measures will be required. A tour guide will narrate your journey, offering tidbits on Gowanus history and landmarks of interest. With the federal EPA now it the midst of a massive clean-up of the canal, it’s only a matter of time before its gritty industrial charms fade from memory. So, if you want to catch the Gowanus in all of its toxic glory, a canoe is waiting for you. Tickets are $35 for the one-and-a-half hour tour, and you can book them here. Most popular on Time Out - You can now get day passes for the gorgeous pool at the William Vale- Everything you need to know about Phase 4 reopeni

A major sculpture installation is coming to Rockefeller Center

A major sculpture installation is coming to Rockefeller Center

This spring, Frieze New York cancelled its annual art fair under the tent on Randalls Island due to the coronavirus, but it wasn't the only casualty: Its concurrent Frieze Sculpture at Rockefeller Center presentation ran afoul of the pandemic, too. But now that NYC is beginning to emerge from the Covid-19 crisis, Frieze's outdoor art showcase, which debuted in 2019 to much acclaim, is back on with an opening date of September 1. Six international artists—Ghada Amer, Beatriz Cortez, Andy Goldsworthy, Lena Henke, Camille Henrot and Thaddeus Mosley—will be featured in the show's second edition, which is being curated by Brett Littman, Director of the Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum in Long Island City. According to Littman, this year's exhibit is being inspired by "the site’s and the city’s natural materials of earth, rock, and plants,” an environmental theme meant to coincide with the show’s original opening date on the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. Works include a garden installation; a takeover of Rockefeller Center’s flagpoles by banners colored with earth gathered from each of the 50 states; and a series of bronzes cast from wooden sculptures sourced from salvaged timber. The show runs until October 2, and you can find preview images of some of the works below.   Ghada Amer, All Oppression Creates A State Of WarPhotograph: Courtesy the artist and Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York/Aspen, © Ghada Amer         Andy Goldsworthy, Red FlagsPhotograph: Courtesy the

The Frick Museum announces plans to move into the old Met Breuer

The Frick Museum announces plans to move into the old Met Breuer

As the saying goes, when one door closes another one opens, and such is the case with the brutalist architectural masterpiece formerly known as The Met Breuer (so named for its designer, Marcel Breuer). Back in June, The Metropolitan Museum Of Art announced that it was closing its contemporary and modern art satellite for good to make room for The Frick Collection—all part of a deal, necessitated by budget woes, that came out of the collapse of The Met's ambition to to establish a rival to MoMA and the Guggenheim by renting the former Madison Avenue address of The Whitney Museum Of American Art, opened in 1966. To mark the changing of the guard, The Frick (which is taking over the remainder of the lease while its Upper East Side home is being substantially expanded) just released the name of its new venue: Frick Madison. Though it sounds like an advertising firm, Frick Madison represents a new, if temporary, venture for an institution known for its renowned collection of Old Master paintings, sculpture and furnishings. It's also the first time in 85 years that it's left the confines of the Frick Mansion at 1 East 70th Street. The Frick Madison is planning to open to the public in early 2021 with an installation of collection highlights organized for the first time chronologically and geographically. Context is everything when it comes to mounting exhibitions, so it will be interesting to see how the museum's objects interact with the midcentury aesthetics of their new digs. M

A sweltering heat wave is on tap for NYC this week

A sweltering heat wave is on tap for NYC this week

Short of flying into the sun, few things are as hellish as a July heat wave in NYC, and now, one has set up over our area that's expected to continue through the end of this week—and even into the next. (These things can linger: a heat wave in 2016 lasted six days.) Highs will be above 90 degrees for much of that time, while daytime temps won't get any lower than the high 80s; thunderstorms will also be rocking the city. On top of that, the heat index will make it feel like it's well north of 100 degrees. The culprit is the jet stream, which is staying well north of much of the U.S. due to a double high pressure system: One pushing up tropical air from the south across a region from SoCal to the Plains states, and another over the Great Lakes spreading high temps into our area. To beat the heat in the meantime, here are some ways to keep cool: -Limit going outdoors, especially at midday. If you must, stay in the shade. Otherwise, remain inside with the AC on. If you don't have an air conditioner, go to one of the city's cooling centers; find one near you here, or call 311. (Pro Good Samaritan Tip: If you have elderly neighbors, check in on them, and suggest going to one if they lack AC.) -Stay hydrated, and don't wait to drink water until you are thirsty. Avoid alcohol, since it can lead to heat stroke by interfering with body's ability to regulate its core temperature. -Wear loose-fitting, lightweight clothes. Avoid donning dark colors while outdoors since they absorb sunlig

The best things in life are free.

Get our free newsletter – it’s great.

Loading animation
Déjà vu! We already have this email. Try another?

🙌 Awesome, you're subscribed!

Thanks for subscribing! Look out for your first newsletter in your inbox soon!