Chelsea restaurant guide: The best places to eat now

The Chelsea restaurant scene is constantly shifting—our critic-approved selection includes trusty favorites and the latest hot spots.

0

Comments

Add +


The arrival of The NoMad, a block away from cult hits The Breslin Bar & Dining Room and The John Dory Oyster Bar, has boosted the Chelsea restaurant scene and cemented the neighborhood’s northeast corner as a hot dining destination. You’ll also find top-notch barbecue and tapas spots, plus plenty of cheap eats and great brunch places.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Chelsea, New York

Boqueria

  • Critics choice

Given that Boqueria is named for Barcelona’s centuries-old food market, you might expect the menu to lean toward the classics. Not quite. Chef Seamus Mullen’s bacalao (salt cod), a standard tapas ingredient, is served here as an airy and crisp beignet. The most successful sangria is an unorthodox beer-based version that mixes lager, pear puree, lemon juice and triple sec. The Flatiron location is small and the bar area packed; a better bet is the 16-seat communal table, where

  1. 53 W 19th St, (between Fifth and Sixth Aves)
More info

The Breslin Bar & Dining Room

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

Even in a city smitten with large-format feasts—whole hogs, huge steaks, heaps of fried chicken—the Breslin breaks new gluttonous ground. The third project from restaurant savant Ken Friedman and Anglo chef April Bloomfield offers the most opulently fatty food in New York—served in medieval portions in a raucous rock & roll setting. Within the casual-restaurant landscape that the pair, also behind the Spotted Pig, has come to epitomize—a world without tablecloths,

  1. Ace Hotel, 16 W 29th St, (at Broadway)
More info

Co.

  • Critics choice

This unassuming pizzeria marks the restaurant debut of cult baker Jim Lahey (Sullivan Street Bakery). Co. lives and dies by its famous no-knead pizza dough, which produces a firm-chewy crust blistered in a searing 900-degree oven. Although the classics are on offer, you’d do well to explore the more creative pies: The Flambé is topped with mellow onions, Gruyère, béchamel and chewy lardons, and the Popeye features three cheeses under a blitz of fresh spinach. The rest of the

  1. 230 Ninth Ave, (at 24th St)
More info

Del Posto

  • Critics choice

With four-star ambitions and prices to match, Mario Batali’s Del Posto set the bar awfully high when it opened in 2005, but the cavernous restaurant has become nothing less than the city’s top destination for refined, upscale Italian cuisine. The clubby dining room, serenaded nightly by a twinkling grand piano, feels like the lobby of a very opulent grand hotel. The kitchen, under the stewardship of longtime Batali protégé Mark Ladner, challenges its French competition in

  1. 85 Tenth Ave, (between 15th and 16th Sts)
More info

Hill Country

  • Critics choice

The guys behind Hill Country are about as Texan as Bloomberg in a Stetson, but the ’cue deserves Lone Star cred all the same. Sausage imported from Kreuz market in Lockhart, TX; slow-smoked slabs of tips-on pork spare ribs; and two brisket options—lean and “moist” (read: fatty)—are not to be missed. Desserts, like jelly-filled cupcakes with peanut butter frosting, suggest some kind of Leave It to Beaver fantasy, though June Cleaver probably wouldn’t approve of the two

  1. 30 W 26th St, (between Broadway and Sixth Ave)
More info

The John Dory Oyster Bar

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

April Bloomfield and Ken Friedman’s original Meatpacking District John Dory was an ambitious, pricey endeavor, but its reincarnation in the Ace Hotel is an understated knockout. Tall stools face a raw bar stocked with a rotating mix of East and West Coast oysters, all expertly handled and impeccably sourced. True to form, the rest of Bloomfield’s tapas-style seafood dishes are intensely flavored. Chilled lobster tastes larger than life, its sweet flesh slicked in an

  1. 1196 Broadway, (at 29th St)
More info

The NoMad

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Price band: 3/4
  • Critics choice

In the golden age of robber baron New York—we’re talking turn of the last century—there were hotel restaurants like the NoMad all across the city, their grand dining rooms buzzing with beau monde patrons morning till night. The recent return of the all-day hotel clubhouse began with hip reinventions of the form at the Standard, Ace and Gramercy Park Hotels. But the NoMad, with its rich mahogany bar and dining rooms shrouded in red velvet curtains, is our first truly opulent

  1. 1170 Broadway, (at 28th St)
Book online

Txikito

  • Critics choice

Chef Alexandra Raij celebrates the cuisine of Spain’s Basque region at this spartan tapas spot. Though it lacks the bustle of Raij’s previous projects (Tia Pol, El Quinto Pino), her sprawling menu still features some solid Iberian fare. Adventurous eats include breaded-and-fried tongue cutlets; squid cut into wispy strands with sweet onions and garlic; and fries with cod-roe mayonnaise. In the end though, expediency—most nights a small party can get in with little

  1. 240 Ninth Ave, (between 24th and 25th Sts)
More info


Users say

0 comments