Get us in your inbox

Amber Sutherland-Namako

Amber Sutherland-Namako

Food & Drink Editor, Time Out New York

Follow Amber Sutherland-Namako

Articles (91)

14 restaurants and bars with amazing views of NYC

14 restaurants and bars with amazing views of NYC

Many of the best views in NYC are free. The best Statue of Liberty lookout is from a grocery store parking lot in Red Hook, the vantage point from the Staten Island Ferry is breathtaking and Astoria Park’s outlooks are unprecedented. But looking at stuff can also work up an appetite, so having some food and drinks to accompany the landscape is a must. Luckily, NYC’s best viewstaurants don’t just dine out on their looks. They also carefully consider their cocktails, curate their wine lists and create plates to rival their spectacular backdrops. Whether they're sky-high, on the water or beachside, these excellent restaurants and bars give you plenty to peep besides your phone–but don't forget to snap a pic, too!

The 11 best places to eat and drink around Rockaway Beach

The 11 best places to eat and drink around Rockaway Beach

There’s a bunch of ways to do a beach day in NYC: You can eat a big breakfast before, pack snacks and fill a flask, turn it into a whole weekend of glamping, or plan your own tasting tour. Rockaway Beach has options each way, and its surrounding restaurants and bars have some of the best frozen drinks, tacos and burgers of any beach in town. Though some stretches will be closed in 2022, the area's terrific venues are still going strong. Here’s everywhere to eat and drink when you’re surfing and sanding in the Rockaways. 

The 50 best restaurants in NYC right now

The 50 best restaurants in NYC right now

Choosing a favorite restaurant in New York City is a joyful task with myriad possibilities depending on the occasion, mood and even the time of year. Your favorite dive, fine dining destination and 'any night' type of place might all occupy top spots on your personal best list in spite of their disparate qualities.  Our list of NYC’s 50 best restaurants is the same, spanning each of those categories and more to comprise a catalogue of all the places we wish we were at right now. They don’t have to be the newest or the most famous (though some are), just places that we want to return to again and again, and that we think that you will, too.  Note: Many of the city’s best chefs, restaurants and concepts have been welcomed into the Time Out Market. Because that is the highest honor we can award, establishments related to the market have not been ranked here, but you can see them below.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best dishes and drinks in NYC

The 14 coolest underground bars in NYC

The 14 coolest underground bars in NYC

Spring and summer in NYC are packed with beautiful breezy days and nights perfect for sipping drinks at rooftop bars and in secret gardens. It is also punctuated by periods of stifling heat that drive us to recoil from the sun like Nosferatu. With projected temperatures nearing 90 degrees, it looks like this weekend is going to be one of 'em. And what better place to escape to than New York City’s finest underground bars.  Though some share a crossover speakeasy-style appeal, these bars are all literally underground, safely ensconced in basements where you can eschew the SPF and avoid the harsh light of day outside. As cool as they are chill, these are the best basement bars to beat the heat in NYC. 

New frozen cocktails to sip this season in NYC

New frozen cocktails to sip this season in NYC

Like the haunting 1997 song turned brick-and-mortar resort chain, frozen cocktails are a "state of mind." They’re also drinks, but you can enjoy them at any time. Some sensational restaurants and bars, places that truly embrace and promote the real meaning of fun, serve them year-round, but availability surges in spring and summer. Many of New York city’s all-time best frozen margaritas, cosmos, coladas and creative creations are on menus right now, and some brand new icy options are available at recently opened spots and old favorites, too. So start planning your warm-weather imbibing now with the city’s latest frozen drinks. 

NYC's 10 best barbecue spots

NYC's 10 best barbecue spots

Like the notion that NYC apartments are smaller than fire escapes or that everyone here's a jerk or each and every one of our bars is speakeasy-themed, claims of our barbecue inferiority are mildly exaggerated. Sure, we aren’t famed for it like we are for our bi-annual social media- disputes over pizza and bagels, but barbecue does exist in the five boroughs, and plenty of it is better than fine, good approaching great, and even outstanding. These are the best spots to visit for barbecue right now, or at least to use as examples in an internet debate. Just remember: You can only win the former.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

The 16 best steakhouses in NYC

The 16 best steakhouses in NYC

Few dining daydreams capture New York City’s culinary appeal as keenly as the notion of slicing into an expertly prepared steak. Whether its butter-basted, arranged amid an abundance of classic sides, grilled right at the table or served with martinis or red wine, it’s a pulse-quickening meal fit for fantasies.  Fortunately, the five boroughs have an abundance of carnivore emporiums, including excellent BBQ, burger and steak restaurants. So sharpen your knives, ready your jaw and dig into the best steakhouses in NYC.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC  

The 13 best frozen cocktails in NYC

The 13 best frozen cocktails in NYC

Trends come and go whether they illustrate a seemingly organic zeitgeist like this year’s influx of speakeasy-style bars or they’re the product of a carefully orchestrated marketing campaign like the Aperol spritz blitz of 2018. Summer is particularly conducive to the form: A season that somehow feels more ephemeral than the others, making abstract promises of love and holidays, all hazy with the patina of heat.  Last year’s so-called drink of the summer was the frozen, as it was before, and is once more and will always be. It's the ideal icy canvas to spin anything into with unending possibilities limited only by the imagination (and occasional supply chain issues). The tipping point in 2021 that delivered more frozens than ever before was the proliferation of places newly making room for slushie machines or plugging blenders in behind the bar.  “I think that frozen drinks are outstanding,” PDT owner Jeff Bell told us in an interview at the time. “I don’t think frozen drinks were received well ten years ago. I think everybody was still in this moral high ground, high horse of like, ‘Oh, that’s a trashy cocktail because it’s frozen.” But as more and more restaurants and bars were able to create or expand their outdoor seating areas, attitudes changed and soon new frozens were joining our old favorites all over town. And, while the occasional zag to something shiny and new can be cute, frozens are the drink of forever summer in NYC.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to summer drinks i

The 40 best brunch spots in NYC right now

The 40 best brunch spots in NYC right now

The best brunch in NYC can be found every day of the week. Saturday brunch is the best time to gear up for the night ahead, Sundays are perfect for relaxing and a weekday brunch is a rarefied treat designated for ad hoc time off. It doesn’t matter so much when you do it, but where you do it. And whether you skew more toward the breakfast or lunch ends of the portmanteau’s spectrum, toward coffee or mimosas, these are the best brunch destinations in NYC.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

Where to get Easter Brunch in NYC this year

Where to get Easter Brunch in NYC this year

Brunch is competitive in New York City any time of year, and interest ticks up even higher on holidays. On Easter Sunday in particular, which falls on April 17 this year, demand for mimosas, bloody Marys, eggs Benedict and all manner of pancakes soars higher than rooftop bars. It's a good time to plan ahead, is all, and these restaurants are receiving some of the best Easter brunch offerings in NYC this year.  RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Easter in NYC

The 28 best outdoor bars in NYC

The 28 best outdoor bars in NYC

In New York City, outdoor drinks are possible, probable and practically perfected year-round, but spring and summer are prime time for open air imbibing. The sunny days are longer, the temperatures are warmer and fun frozen drinks reenter the mix all around town. With appearances by boat bars, rooftops, dives and secret gardens, these are our favorite places to sip beer, wine, cocktails and all manner of boozy consumables outside in NYC this season.  RECOMMENDED: More of the best bars in NYC

The 19 best waterfront restaurants in NYC

The 19 best waterfront restaurants in NYC

There is a reason why we long to touch the surf, why kids skip stones on creeks, young lovers kick off their shoes to wade into river beds and aspiring villains ascribe intrigue to international waters: The sea is beguiling. And in New York City, we have plenty of places to get close enough to almost see our refracted reflection on its surface.  Some of those opportunities are at our beaches, others are aboard boats, and many of the best are at restaurants and bars near the water. With views of the Hudson and East River, the Atlantic Ocean and the nautical breeze to match, these are NYC’s best seasonal and year-round waterfront destinations. RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

Listings and reviews (111)

Shan

Shan

3 out of 5 stars

Brooklyn’s Smith Street was once considered as venerable restaurant row as any in NYC. Its changing reputation as . . . less than that has been chronicled in the Observer, Brooklyn Magazine and in these very pages. With the trickling addition of new venues in recent years, is Smith Street poised for a comeback? Maybe! Was the immediate area absent a good Szechuan restaurant before Shan opened last month? Yes.  Shan follows Long Island City’s Michelin Bib Gourmand restaurant Hupo. The newer of the two is already popular. The estimated wait on a recent Friday night was one hour. And on Saturday at around 2pm, the long banquette in the shades of slate, blue and lacquered black dining room upfront, which has gleaming hardwood floors and a chicly distressed yet-to-be stocked bar with low-back stools, was full. Booths in a cozy, brick-lined nook beyond were also occupied, but the back, similarly-styled space had plenty of room.  There’s also plenty on Shan’s menu, which spans several QR code-generated swipes. That mapo tofu ($16) fills a miles-wide void. Its sauce achieves the ideal density to suspend finely minced pork and tofu cubes as satisfying to crush as snapping bubble wrap. It's good even without the expected málà: Neither noticeably hot or at all numbing, but perfectly pleasant nonetheless, and perhaps calibrated to area tastes where some of the best restaurants of yore (Battersby, Char No. Four, The Grocery, Saul) have been replaced by more general interest menus.  Heat d

Citrico Cafe

Citrico Cafe

3 out of 5 stars

Some places are so much themselves that it’s hard to imagine them as anything else. When I lived near Citro Cafe’s location (mumbles) years ago, my closest restaurant and bar options were a casual chain approximating a neighborhood bar and grill, another pantomiming regional pizza from another region and a Starbucks.  In their manufactured way, each of those places are, of course, also hard to imagine as anything else, at least once you’re through the door. Each would be simultaneously indistinguishable and familiar if they were transported, as is, to a whole new neighborhood, or the city by the lake, or a mall. But they weren’t the kind of spots that were going to convince any of my friends to come to Queens. Citrico Cafe, which opened last month, is that kind of place. The owner, Alex Marquetti, also runs other Queens venues Dive Bar LIC and Mojo in Forest Hills, with a second on Long Island.  The large, lofty Mexican cafe & agaveria is a fun, friendly, easy place to linger. It has a long strip of buzzy sidewalk seats set back from the street outside, broad windows and high ceilings that lend a literal and figurative airy feel. Inside, a pretty bar at the center of the room has lean lines and backlighting. Tables and a long banquette beneath sleek chandeliers and amid pops of greenery are to the left. Another dining area is to the right, up a few stairs and separate enough for semi-private parties with light fixtures that look like paper lanterns overhead. The space is both

Hudson Smokehouse

Hudson Smokehouse

The only Smokehouse in the Bronx opened days before citywide hospitality shutdowns in 2020, ascending from the ashes ever since. A smattering of knotty wood tables populate the counter-service spot, where metal trays are piled with burnt ends, turkey breast, pork and brisket by the pound, plus sandwiches, wings and plentiful sides. 

Royal Rib House

Royal Rib House

Recently relocated Royal Rib grew its following over the course of half a century at its previous address, and now the family owned business is back in action with old and new fans near its original location. Expect to wait in line for ribs, chicken and plentiful sides that have pleased generations. 

Chocobar Cortés

Chocobar Cortés

Chocobar Cortés is New York City’s premier destination for all things chocolate. The recent addition to the South Bronx from Old San Juan imbues its croquetas, pancakes, waffles and even salads, sandwiches and burgers with that titular ingredient to delightful effect. And you’ll never guess what’s for dessert. 

All & Sundry

All & Sundry

3 out of 5 stars

NYC tourist regions like Times Square, Grand Central and Bryant Park have plenty of restaurants to choose from, but few that capture that often intangible neighborhood-like quality. Columbus Circle—right by Central Park and tons of commercial real estate, decently adjacent to theater and museums—isn’t any different. But in February, the area got a lovely new spot that looks and feels like it would be at home anywhere in town.  All & Sundry, across from the big mall on 58th Street, follows Sophie Bruschi, Mike O’Sullivan and Danny Grace’s Irish pubs Harley’s in Clinton Hill and Grace’s in the West Village. It's a departure from the trio’s previous Emerald Isle-inspired ventures. (O’Sullivan and Grace are from Ireland.) It’s quickly emerged as the immediate area’s best easy place to grab a drink and some good food.  Billed as a bistro and bar, it has a strip of street and sidewalk seats outside. Down a few steps inside, a little pastel velvet-upholstered nook with room for about half-a-dozen is strewn with throw pillows. A pretty green bar with glass shelves and subtly colorful globe lights overhead is farther back. A row of high-top tables is to the left. Some Instagram elements are present–a single wooden swing is fixed inside a small alcove–without veering into the Immersive Restaurant Experience zone. It’s cute before the point of cloying.  The cocktail menu’s Stanford ($16) is described as a cosmo snow cone with vodka, triple sec, cranberry and lime. It sounds like the bar

Patti Ann's

Patti Ann's

2 out of 5 stars

Patti Ann’s is the latest in a prudently slow-burning dynasty from the talented chef Greg Baxtrom. It follows his highly regarded seasonal ingredient bastion Olmsted, which opened in 2016, and his 2019 followup French yakitori, Maison Yaki. Both were quick to accrue accolades and the crowds that follow when they first launched, three years apart.  Nearly another three years later, but with much more distance given which three years those were, Baxtrom opened Evi’s Bäckerei with pastry chef Alex Grunert to tons of attention before it even became apparent that the shop’s pastries were as good as they are. It occupies a few hundred square feet on Vanderbilt Avenue, where all of Baxtrom’s operations collect mail. Patti Ann’s came next at the same address last month.  Olmsted tapped into the settling down of the once straightforward but eventually vexingly nebulous farm-to-table trend. Maison Yaki caught the skewer wave of 2019 right on time. Patti Ann’s official self-designation is Midwestern comfort food. (Mostaccioli . . . I haven’t heard that name in years.) It also seems to be grasping for another less-defined dining genre: The sort of so-so moneyed family spot with plain enough food to please grammom, kids and the parents who are just trying to drink it out between those loveable bookends.  The 70-seat space is schoolhouse chic and with pops of primary colors, geometric shapes and board games stacked into cubby shelves. The corner location’s large windows let a lot of light

The Queensboro

The Queensboro

First opened in 2018, this Northern Boulevard charmer is lined in long banquettes, with roomy, cozy booths and plenty of seats in the bar area. Hardwood floors shine below and leafy plants and rustic exposed beams are fixed overhead. The menus are frequently updated, and you can expect items to slake any sized group’s varied appetites any time of day. 

Clover Hill

Clover Hill

5 out of 5 stars

There is a pair of idyllic views from the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway heading north right after Atlantic Avenue. In the distance to the left: An expanse of the East River and the Manhattan skyline. Just to the right: A bird's-eye look at a little pocket of Brooklyn Heights that seems to write in swoopy script across your windshield, if you lived here you’d be home now.  That those homes are all unspeakably expensive makes it curious that the neighborhood was recently absent a special occasion destination restaurant. But if you were to ride an umbrella down from the BQE to the sidewalk like Mary Poppins, you’d land near Clover Hill, a wonderful new spot that brilliantly fills that gap along with some everyday dining options as well.  Clover Hill first opened in the former location of the highly-regarded Iris Café in December of 2019 with the previous occupant’s manager, Clay Castillo and his friend-turned business partner Gabriel Merino at the helm. The pair had to close shortly thereafter due to the pandemic, and linked with executive chef Charlie Mitchell (Eleven Madison Park) before reopening for daytime operations this past February. Dinner service began in March.  Its address is even more charming at street level than from traffic fantasies. Located on the one-block stretch of Columbia Place between State and Joralemon, it feels like a secret, tree-lined annex to one of the few parts of NYC that could still almost pass for a hamlet. It’s as leafy and quaint as the rest of

Inga's Bar

Inga's Bar

4 out of 5 stars

Salads are more labor intensive than they’re typically given credit for. Maybe it’s because of the proliferation of NYC’s Rube Goldberg-esque work lunch salad spots that spin out 108-ingredient bowls in under a minute. But, absent a dedicated assembly line, I laugh at the common de facto dismissal that anything is “just a salad.” I make them at home a lot, and they take forever, but then I do toast the pepitas so maybe that’s on me. Anyway, several times a week, I am literally a woman laughing alone with salad.   The celery Victor with anchovy and parmesan ($16) at Inga’s Bar, which opened in Brooklyn Heights last month, is not just a salad. Credited to the French chef Victor Hirtzler at the San Francisco St. Francis Hotel circa 1910, its base is a bed of marvelous celery hearts typically marinated in a non-vegetarian stock and married to anchovies. Inga’s gets that primary ingredient just right, landing on a texture to please celery devotees and dissenters alike, topping the marvelous melange with wonderfully rough bits of cheese. The whole lovely plate is imbued with the essence of those slivery fish. Though you might not spear one of the tiny suckers, their inimitable presence is abundant. Remember how Via Carota’s salad became a whole thing? I predict a similar outcome here.  Inga’s short rib dish ($30) is also imbued with flavor, but, where the salad sings, this is one note. It looks promising enough, with meat pulling apart with the flick of a fork atop a cloud of mashe

Nothing Really Matters

Nothing Really Matters

Only incidentally one of NYC’s latest speakeasy concepts, Nothing Really Matters aims only to be “the best cocktail bar in the universe,” rather than a late-arriving throwback. But it still fits the bill better than many of its contemporaries by virtue of its recessed entrance in a midtown subway station alone. Find your way downtown-bound to see whether the style tracks. 

Keys & Heels

Keys & Heels

Keys & Heels digs into the biz-within-a-biz motif many speakeasy concepts have employed over the years. This time, the bar’s behind the facade of an old fashioned key-cutting shoe repair shop. But before you let the cocktails go to your head, decide to split the rent with your date and scuff your stiletto in a dash out the door to start your new life of romance, remember that the entrance is but a decoy. Only the drinks and snacks in the back are the real deal. 

News (134)

Gugu Room is a new Filipino-Japanese izakaya on the Lower East Side

Gugu Room is a new Filipino-Japanese izakaya on the Lower East Side

Nearly three years after the well-received Filipino restaurant Tsismis opened on the Lower East Side, a new concept billed as “New York’s first Filipino-Japanese izakaya” will take over the same address.  Gugu Room is slated to open on Wednesday, May 18, with chef Aris Tuazon (Ugly Kitchen) and chef Markee Manaloto (Kissaki) at the helm. To start, the lengthy, sharable opening menu includes agedashi tofu, chicken karaage, and balut, which is accompanied by a menu note and a general bit of good advice that reads, “don’t knock it till you try it,” regarding the 18-day fertilized duck egg. Crispy gyoza tacos are filled with rock shrimp, kanikama, tuna, or a choice of pork or chicken sisig. And the kushiyaki section includes pierced proteins like spicy teriyaki grilled chicken, ribeye and five pork varieties.  Photograph: Courtesy of Michael Tulipan/MST Creative PR Entrees deep fry pork belly, knuckle and taro, add breaded cod to a larger sisig and combine udon, short rib and bone marrow. Kare-kare is available with short rib or tofu headlining the peanut-based stew and Bicol Express and a zag re-dubbed the Gugu take with pork bagnet are both among the entrees, both promising heat.  The drink menu is also abundant, numbering dozens of Japanese and American whiskeys from the full bar, plus sake, shochu, beer and wine by the glass or $50 bottle. Cocktails like the yuzu gimlet (gin, orange liqueur, St. Germain, yuzu juice), wasabi mar-gari-ta (blanco tequila, Cointreau, calamansi

Flatiron gets a new musical steakhouse this week

Flatiron gets a new musical steakhouse this week

Although NYC has tons of fantastic steakhouses, new ones don’t seem to open up as frequently as, say, this year’s ever-expanding list of speakeasy-themed bars. But tomorrow, Friday, May 13, a new entry to the beefy genre gets grilling in Flatiron.  Vinyl Steakhouse is named for its dual conceits: music and meat. Musical memorabilia factors into the decor. Vintage-style show posters line the walls, prints depict Run-DMC, Debbie Harry and the Beastie Boys and shelves are filled with album sleeves. And, beyond those show tunes, expect to hear full sides from among the 2,000-plus records collected by sommelier-owner Kevin Flannery, who operates the restaurant with his somm wife Sofia.  Photograph: Courtesy of KK Chote MST Creative PR Executive Chef Alexander Lord-Flynn joins from the East Village French restaurant Jules Bistro, which closed during the pre-vaccine pandemic. Lord-Flynn was also previously the private chef at a Montana cattle ranch. Steak, of course, factors significantly into the opening menu, including an 8- or 10-ounce filet mignon, ribeye, New York strip and dry aged porterhouse for two. Classic steakhouse sides like mac and cheese (this one truffled), creamed spinach (turned carbonara with pancetta, parm and egg yolk) and a potato pavé piled with bacon, chives, gouda and jalapeño are also available.  The rest of the menu has plenty of general interest items for red meat dissenters, including a few salads, some sushi options, crab cakes, shrimp cocktail and on

The Woo Woo joins this year's speakeasy boom

The Woo Woo joins this year's speakeasy boom

Some stuff is subjective, like what drink will this be the summer of? Last year’s was the frozen, though some reported alternative anecdotal perceptions. Other stuff is evidenced by empirical fact, like the great speakeasy-style bar resurgence of 2022.  In March, I explored why hidden spots and the patina of secrecy, however thin, have become de rigueur once more in the post-vaccine pandemic, and the genre has continued to expand since then. The latest entrant to the speakeasy-theme scene opens tonight, Wednesday May 11, in Times Square, with a couple more conceits on top of that designation: Sex and the 80s!  Photograph: Courtesy of Phil O'Brian The Woo Woo is the latest from PMac’s Hospitality, which operates a consortium of large, exceedingly midtown-y restaurants in, of course, midtown. This one is adjacent to the group’s Irishish offering, The Mean Fiddler, where you can request a password for permission to woo if you haven’t simply found the phrase on the bar’s website or made a reservation.  Inside, The Woo Woo aims to evoke that last decade before widespread internet, its surrounding neighborhood of Times Square in those same, pre-Disney days, sex shops and, the reason for the season, speakeasies. These themes are executed with a combination of graffiti that reasonably approximates the style of the time, vintage nude mags and video tapes, rouge neon, throwback punk show posters and the whole password thing.   Photograph: Courtesy of Phil O'Brian Drinks include ode

Mermaid Mexicana is the latest restaurant from NYC’s popular Mermaid group

Mermaid Mexicana is the latest restaurant from NYC’s popular Mermaid group

The Mermaid Inn, which first made a splash in Manhattan in 2003, has seen a slow and steady seafood expansion over nearly two decades. Between two Inns and its Oyster Bar, all have been seafood forward in curious juxtaposition with its sexy, sexy illustrated logo. But today, Tuesday, May 10, the team turns from its usual fare with its latest venture, Mermaid Mexicana, in the familiar waters of Greenwich Village.  Chef Victor Marin, whose previous credits include Mermaid Oyster Bar and Sushisamba nearby, is at Mermaid Mexicana’s helm. The opening menu includes chips and guacamole, flautas and quesadillas to start, six taco varieties and large plates like enchiladas suizas and pescado a la talla. There’s a little more fish where that came from, too, in the cóctel de camarones, fluke aguachile and a few other items, should you need to ease into new things.  View this post on Instagram A post shared by Mermaid Mexicana (@mermaidmexicana) Ranch water, which adds tequila or vodka to Topo Chico and lime, micheladas and palomas are among the cocktails, in addition to wine and beer. Margaritas are available on the rocks or frozen, and several types of tequila and mezcal are also listed.  The familiar space previously hosted Mermaid Oyster Bar’s original iteration. And, in keeping with the local mini-chain’s reputation, Mermaid Mexicana will have a happy hour daily from 4:30pm to 6:30pm, when a smattering of snacks are all $10, select cocktails are $9, wine is $

Holywater is a new bar on land from NYC's best boat bar group

Holywater is a new bar on land from NYC's best boat bar group

Crew hospitality group has been helping New Yorkers fake sailing photos since 2014 when it opened Grand Banks in far west Tribeca—more precisely, on a wooden schooner docked on the Hudson River. Pilot followed on another schooner in Brooklyn Bridge Park in 2017, and today, the Crew team operates four seaside (or sea-top) spots citywide. Now, it's trying its hand on land with the opening of Holywater this Wednesday, May 11.  Photograph: Courtesy of Douglas Lyle Thompson Holywater is a return to Tribeca—a few blocks inland. It still evokes nautical notions via decorative maritime literature, cozy, ship cabin spaces and with aesthetic oceanic strokes like bronze mermaids and a lacquered faux-hammerhead shark mounted near the bar. Its website also boasts a testimonial from the actor and area resident Harvey Keitel (“I love this joint!”), who is credited as playing “Blue Whale customer” in the 1960s soap opera Dark Shadows, perhaps foreshadowing this very venture.  In keeping with the theme, Holywater’s dinner menu is abundant with seafood like oysters, clams, shrimp, lobster, and of course a couple of seafood towers. There are also a few caviar preparations including atop tater tots, in addition to larger plates like lobster frites, crawfish étouffée, burgers and steak.  Photograph: Courtesy of Douglas Lyle Thompson Cocktails number the titular Holywater with rum, cognac, Chartreuse, lemon, grapefruit, bitters and a scorch of fire, sazeracs, sidecars and a boozy Arnold Palmer

Le Gratin is the latest restaurant from Chef Daniel Boulud

Le Gratin is the latest restaurant from Chef Daniel Boulud

French chef Daniel Boulud is known all over the globe for fine dining destinations like New York City’s genre-defining Daniel. Tonight, Friday, May 6, one of the fanciest household names in the culinary world will open a new restaurant intended as a more casual affair.  Le Gratin is not Boulud’s first foray into what might be more reasonably classified as everyday special-occasion spots. The chef’s Bar Boulud and Boulud Sud are each more approachable than that august institution, and that same famous name is splashed across informal operations at Lincoln Center and new NYC skyscraper One Vanderbilt. But, in this case, “casual” is a charmingly incongruous description, given Le Gratin’s ornately beautiful address.  Photograph: Courtesy of Bill Milne The restaurant’s grand interior is on the ground floor of the beautiful Beekman Hotel across square footage previously occupied by Augustine. Local artist Marc Dennis created new works to line the space between marbled floors and coffered ceilings. Large leather banquettes and white tablecloths are lit by chandeliers and honeyed hues bounce off oversized mirrors. The dining room seems to split the difference between a power lunch location and a romantic dinner venue.  The Lyon-influenced menu was authored by Boulud and chefs Guillaume Ginther and Jean François Bruel, both of whom have Daniel bonafides. Oysters and tuna crudo are among the raw bar options, soups and salads include a chilled watercress vichyssoise and gem lettuce, g

New to Nolita, Wan Wan follows two other local favorites

New to Nolita, Wan Wan follows two other local favorites

Rivers and Hills Hospitality Group, the team behind hit NYC restaurants Wayla (which also has a presence at Time Out Market New York in Brooklyn) and Kimika (one of the best new openings of 2020) will open its latest Manhattan destination tonight, Tuesday, May 3. Photograph: Courtesy of Andrew Bui Wayla’s talented executive chef Tom Naumsuwan is also at the helm here at Wan Wan, inspired by erstwhile Phuket restaurants. Bangkok-born Naumsuwan will prepare regional Thai dishes that are less commercially available in New York. The opening menu includes taw hu tod, which pairs crispy soft tofu with peanut sauce, moo hong, which flavors marinated and braised and spare ribs with ginger and garlic, hor mok crab cakes and a long list of noodle dishes. A liquor license is pending.  Photograph: Courtesy of Andrew Bui Wan Wan’s stylish, somewhat homey space has exposed brick walls, sepia-toned checkerboard floors, lots of natural light through floor to ceiling windows and colorful textiles like the deep millennial pink that covers banquettes and fluffy throw pillows and a sweeping green curtain behind one line of seats.  Wan Wan is located at 209 Mulberry Street. It is open Sunday-Monday from 5pm-10pm.  Love doing stuff in your city? Tell us all about it in our annual, global, Time Out Index survey.

Get free margaritas at Domino Park this Cinco de Mayo!

Get free margaritas at Domino Park this Cinco de Mayo!

New Yorkers will be toasting Cinco de Mayo all over town at NYC’s best Mexican restaurants and margarita destinations this Thursday, May 5, and, with a little planning and a little luck, with free drinks at The Margarita Mobile in Williamsburg’s Domino Park.  The single item bar on wheels is a collaboration between delivery platform Uber Eats and frequent margarita ingredient Cointreau. For your best shot at the gratis goods, register here. (The event is for people 21 and up and registration does not guarantee freebies.) Then, visit Domino Park at 15 River Street beginning at 2pm on Cinco de Mayo. The promotion runs until 7pm, but supplies are, as expected, limited. Photograph: Courtesy of Uber Successful guests can get two just-shaken margaritas each and unlimited chips and salsa. Thirty people will also nab margarita kits including tequila, Cointreau, a shaker, glasses and garnishes. The kits are also available for purchase via Uber Eats.  Love doing stuff in your city? Tell us all about it in our annual, global, Time Out Index survey.

A Tuscan restaurant joins Eataly Downtown's dining options

A Tuscan restaurant joins Eataly Downtown's dining options

Even as questions about the future of traditionally office-concentrated neighborhoods like midtown and the Financial District continue to make headlines, new restaurants and bars move into the formerly much buzzier areas.  Firenze Ristorante Toscano & Bar is the latest addition to the former, an Eataly operation on the third floor of 101 Liberty Street. It joins the plainly named La Pizza and La Pasta and elaborately punctuated Vino &... under the same roof. This new addition will also serve three of those titular items–pasta, wine and and–but not pizza.  Photograph: Courtesy of Eataly Firenze Ristorante Toscano & Bar, which, in a tiny departure from the superstore’s more literal titles, means “Florence Tuscan Restaurant & Bar,” will serve a chickpea flatbread with rosemary and extra virgin olive oil to start, plus a classic ribollita Toscana, meatballs, burrata, and large plates like pollo al rosmarino, pesce alla piastra and a 42-oz bistecca alla fiorentina dry-aged for 30 days.  A dedicated martini menu numbers seven cocktails that all incorporate Italian elements. The Vespro adds Borgogno Bianco to vodka, gin liqueur and orange bitters, the Mezzo-Mezzo includes Bordiga extra dry vermouth and even the Originale is made with Portofino gin. Other sips like the Arno spritz aim to “capture the spirit of Florence.”  Photograph: Courtesy of Eataly The design is also meant to evoke Florentine architecture, and curved caramel-colored tufted leather booths and long banquettes l

The Instagram Thing: A gleaming Red Hook food trailer

The Instagram Thing: A gleaming Red Hook food trailer

The Instagram Thing is an occasional column spotlighting things you’ll want to Instagram. Our previous editions highlighted the ten-foot snake topiary at the Standard East Village, the pegasus at Serendipity3, the beef tartare at Little Mad, the bicycles at GupShup, the giant moose at Spaghetti Tavern, the cheesecake creature at Vestry and the sparkle bathroom at Nothing Really Matters. Red Hook has a tremendous number of eating and drinking destinations—including some of NYC’s best dive bars, rooftops and burger spots—throughout the peninsula. Last summer, it also gained a particularly photogenic food truck on Van Dyke Street near the water’s edge. More precisely a vintage Spartanette trailer, United Sandwiches of America builds all manner of handheld stacks inside the gleaming silvery vehicle that dates back to 1948. Like the beginnings of a sandwich itself, the trailer was merely a shell of its eventual state when owners Eric Paris and Brooke Smith first acquired the beauty. The pair, formerly Broadway theater managers, retrofitted the Spartanette with a flat top grill, charbroiler and other equipment to transform it into a fully functional kitchen. The moveable feast is also still operational for its intended purpose (cruising), but its permanent home is now fixed a few yards from another area favorite, Steve’s Authentic Key Lime Pies.  Photograph: Courtesy of United Sandwiches of America The trailer is positioned on its own artificial yard: A carpet of faux-turf like y

The Arlo Hotel's new speakeasy concept is hidden in plain sight

The Arlo Hotel's new speakeasy concept is hidden in plain sight

One way to to launch a new bar in the year 2022 is to imbue it with the air of secrecy. Of every possible concept—martini joints, Instagram bait, dives (not that you can truly open a new dive)—speakeasy concepts and simply hidden bars have emerged as this moment’s trend. They’re down staircases, behind fake facades, inside other businesses and obscured in plain sight. Foxtail, which opens on Friday, April 29, is behind velvet curtains in the lobby of the Arlo Soho Hotel. It follows Lindens restaurant, which opened in November.  Photograph: Courtesy of Renwick Hospitality Group The Mad Men-inspired bar will serve what they’ve identified as “50s and 60s” style cocktails in a space replete with the expected design details given the source material. It promises to be a blast not only from that stylish past, but also from a more recent era when every bar in NYC was seemed legally required to evoke the show’s tragic but romanticized representation of the time.  Photograph: Courtesy of Renwick Hospitality Group Foxtail’s 100-seat space is surrounded by velvet curtains in an aim to create that sly speakeasy aesthetic. Its opening menu includes spiked punch bowls and cocktails fashioned after famous throwbacks like pineapple upside down cake. Snacks include raw bar items like shrimp cocktail, oysters and seafood plateaus, plus pizza and pasta options. Live music and burlesque shows are planned for the future. Late happy hour specials will be available after 10pm.  Foxtail is loca

Mission Sandwich Social is a new shop spotlighting San Francisco-style bread

Mission Sandwich Social is a new shop spotlighting San Francisco-style bread

There are more possible sandwich combinations than there is time in the world to enjoy them all. One might spend a lifetime eating them at a school desk at lunch, picnicking in the park or choosing sides in purported poultry wars without cracking even a sampling of all the available triple-decker, hoagie, bánh mì, pita, tea, torta and toast varieties. That unending landscape will expand even further on Tuesday, May 3 with the opening of Mission Sandwich Social in Brooklyn.  The former chef de cuisine at ‘hidden’ downtown restaurant Beauty & Essex, Brian Tsao has been crafting elaborate sandwiches since he was a kid. Now Tsao, who also hosts a YouTube series titled “Sandwich Sunday,” will continue building on that background at Mission Sandwich Social.  Photograph: Courtesy of Sean Ageman Tsao’s new takeout and delivery spot is inspired by San Francisco-style sandwiches, evidenced by his use of Dutch crunch bread. The Bay Area favorite is characterized by its titular texture. A local bakery makes it for Mission Sandwich Social alone, and Tsao visits the loaves each morning to finish them with the rice flour paste that gives the resulting subs their signature rough exterior.  There are 12 sandwiches on the opening menu, including three childhood favorites. The adult options are dedicated to sauce. The Bensonhurst coats a chicken cutlet, prosciutto, fresh mozzarella and Parm, pesto, broccoli rabe, red chili flakes and oregano in marinara. The Peking Turkey covers its clucker,