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Photograph: Cayla Zahoran

The 15 best steakhouses in NYC

The best steakhouses in NYC serve tender porterhouses, sirloins and rib-eyes.

Written by
Time Out contributors
,
Bao Ong
&
Amber Sutherland-Namako
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Few dining daydreams capture New York City’s culinary appeal as keenly as the notion of slicing into an expertly prepared steak. Whether its butter-basted, arranged amid an abundance of classic sides, grilled right at the table or served with martinis or red wine, it’s a pulse-quickening meal fit for fantasies. 

Fortunately, the five boroughs have an abundance of carnivore emporiums, including excellent BBQ, burger and steak restaurants. So sharpen your knives, ready your jaw and dig into the best steakhouses in NYC. 

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

Best steakhouse in NYC

  • Restaurants
  • Korean
  • Flatiron
  • price 3 of 4

What is it? A sleek, marble-washed, chef-favorite Korean steakhouse from Michelin-starred restaurateur Simon Kim.

Why go? Chef David Shim (M. Wells Steakhouse, Kristalbelli) puts a shine on standards like shrimp cocktail with gochujang-spiked tartar sauce, and studs the steak tartare with cubes of Asian pear. Bring your besties for the Butcher’s Feast, a flashy spread of seasonal banchan, two stews (spicy kimchi, fermented soy-tofu) and a daily-changing rotation of four steaks fired on gold-rimmed table grills.

  • Restaurants
  • Steakhouse
  • Midtown West
  • price 4 of 4

What is it? This 136-year-old chop of history serves sirloin and porterhouse steaks (for one, two or three) that set standards over the past century-plus, and hold their own today. The "legendary" mutton chop is also worth writing home about.


Why go? To dine like one of Keens' famous guests from decades past, including Babe Ruth, Will Rogers and Teddy Roosevelt, whose smoking pipes adorn the ceiling and walls.

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  • Restaurants
  • Steakhouse
  • Williamsburg
  • price 2 of 4

What is it? A little more veggie-leaning than the rest, St. Anselm explores grilling's greaseless, flame-licked potential with a well-rounded menu combining Mediterranean, Asian and local flavors—with smoky slabs of halloumi and miniature fire-roasted eggplants with fried goat cheese and honey.

Why go? Main-event proteins include a charred hanger packed with a earthy flavor, as fine a slab of beef as is available at any famous steakhouse in town.

  • Restaurants
  • Steakhouse
  • Midtown West
  • price 4 of 4

What is it? This mustily masculine beef house opened in 1927 and boasts a glass-enclosed street-side meat locker loaded with dry-aged steaks flamed the old-fashioned way—over a hickory-coal grill. 

Why go? The 52nd Street locker is a landmark in Midtown, with locals and tourists flocking outside for commemorative selfies after conquering their rib-eyes and marbled sirloins.

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  • Restaurants
  • Steakhouse
  • Williamsburg
  • price 4 of 4

What is it? Although a slew of Luger copycats have prospered in NYC, none have captured the elusive charm (or cyclical divisiveness) of this stucco-walled, beer-hall-style eatery, with its well-worn wooden floors and tables, and waiters in waistcoats and bowties.

Why go? Alternately beloved and maligned, this is the most discussed steakhouse in New York City. Plus, the famous porterhouse for two—36 ounces of sliced prime beef—is a singular experience worth having.

  • Restaurants
  • Steakhouse
  • Upper West Side
  • price 4 of 4

What is it? This restaurant from chef Michael Lomonaco (Windows on the World) is part of the all-star lineup at the Time Warner Center with a neutral-hued interior, sweeping view and generous portions.

Why go? Any place named for a single menu item had better have a good one, and Porter House other fine cuts, too. Pair a gloriously charred steak with one of the 500 wines on offer.

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  • Restaurants
  • Steakhouse
  • Midtown West
  • price 4 of 4

What is it? Michael Stillman, the son of Smith & Wollensky founder Alan Stillman, runs this highly stylized industrial theme park complete with meat-hook light fixtures, wooden butcher blocks, white tiles and exposed brick.

Why go? Lespinasse-trained chef Craig Koketsu nails the steaks and breathes new life into traditional side dishes: the corn crème brûlée and airy gnocchi & cheese (a grown-up take on mac and cheese) are worth the trip alone.

  • Restaurants
  • Steakhouse
  • Greenwich Village
  • price 4 of 4

What is it? Strip House cultivates a retro-sexy vibe with its suggestive name, red furnishings and vintage pinups. But it’s still a modern meat shrine flaunting French influences.

Why go? The kitchen makes sure the New York strips arrive at your table still sizzling, seasoned with sea salt and peppercorns, and showing no sign of extraneous fat. Everyone will enjoy the black-truffle creamed spinach, one of several gourmet takes on classic steak sides, but it's the towering signature 24-layer chocolate cake that really steals the show here.

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  • Restaurants
  • Steakhouse
  • Tribeca
  • price 3 of 4

What is it? A spin-off of the Atlantic City original, this playpen for high-rolling carnivores is suffused with wafting scents of singed fat and smoke-laced bourbon. Burnished rosewood tables big enough for a poker game await hedge-funders eager to go all in on beef and booze.

Why go? The menu caters to lily gilding, inviting you to top any of its wet- or dry-aged steaks with bacon, crab or chili lobster. If you’re keen on embellishments, you’ll want the bone-in rib-eye that’s Katz-ified into a smoky, spice-crusted pastrami steak topped with caraway butter.

  • Restaurants
  • Steakhouse
  • Tribeca
  • price 4 of 4

What is it? A gamble fom Wolfgang Zwiener, a former Peter Luger waiter who opened his own steakhouse in midtown in 2004 and later created an offshoot of his original offshoot. But this is no knockoff; it remains one of the best (albeit priciest) restaurants of its ilk.

Why go? The steaks are great—thick, juicy and perfectly charred. Duos can order porterhouses for two, and solo diners can dig into a filet mignon, rib-eye or sirloin without feeling like they’re getting second-best.

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  • Restaurants
  • Steakhouse
  • Chelsea
  • price 4 of 4

What is it? Opened in 1868 as a dockworkers’ chophouse, this clubby establishment draws a laid-back New York crowd. Old Homestead is also one of the best restaurants in Chelsea.

Why go? Yellowfin tuna sashimi and ever-fresh raw-bar selections shine on the menu, but the real star is the beef. Spring for the flavorful strip steak or a well-seasoned prime rib. Any way you carve it, this place stands the test of time.

  • Restaurants
  • Steakhouse
  • East Village
  • price 2 of 4

What is it? Making an effort to distance itself from the He-Man confines of machismo steakhouse lineage, Bowery Meat Company touts itself as a "meatcentric restaurant" and raw bar. Servers hoist wooden boards of raw meat around the mildly mid-century room to tantalize diners with three-figure steaks for two.

Why go? BMC certainly has solid steakhouse ambiance, but its a little more comfortable and relaxed than some of its stuffier Midtown counterparts.

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What is it? Between its intimate park and the area's ornate architecture, Tudor City feels like a private oasis removed from the city’s frenetic energy. One of its secrets? Tudor City Steakhouse.

Why go? It may be mistaken for the community’s own restaurant, but it’s a welcoming space where you can enjoy a comforting meat-and-potatoes dinner where prime dry-aged beef is the star.

  • Restaurants
  • Steakhouse
  • Midtown West
  • price 3 of 4

What is it? An old-school chophouse equipped with a 50-foot marble bar, dark yellow leather chairs and beige wallpapper where Peter Luger alums dole out seafood alongside meaty specialties.

Why go? Its two NYC locations (and another in Tokyo) are famous for dry-aged steaks (filet mignon, prime rib) and Wagyu offerings, as well as decadent sides like truffle oil mac and cheese and a mozzarella and tomato salad. 

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What is it? A former mob hangout, this classic chophouse slings lean 16-ounce prime sirloins, savory beef scaloppine and steak fromage (filet mignon topped with Roquefort).

Why go? When your fork slides through a velvety wedge of chocolate mousse cake, you’ll feel sorry for Gambino crime boss Paul Castellano, who was famously whacked as he approached the entrance in 1985. 

Want to eat some soul food tonight?

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