Big festivals and major events in Barcelona: Winter

All the festivals and big events you need to know about to celebrate winter in Barcelona
Fira de Santa Llucia
By Time Out Barcelona |
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There's lots of things to do to celebrate winter in Barcelona, from Christmas markets to New Year's Eve's parties and Kings' Day, as well as Barcelona's celebration of noir literature and a big fashion show. There's also the massive Mobile World Congress, Carnaval and more.

Barcelona: Winter Festivals and Events

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080 Barcelona Fashion

Where: Teatre Nacional de Catalunya
When: 2019 dates TBA
Website: www.080barcelonafashion.cat
Discover what you should be wearing, according to Catalan designers, this autumn and winter with this bi-annual event to promote the local fashion industry. As well as catwalk shows there are talks and discussions on the sector, pop-up shops, DJ sessions, photo competitions and stands from some of the local design schools, where you can spot the next generation of 080 participants.

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ModaFad

Where: various venues
When: 2019 dates TBA
Website: www.modafad.org
During Barcelona's fashion week, Modafad represents risk-taking, emerging, and independent talent on an international platform where young people occupy the forefront of the fashion world with their ideas that are far from stereotypical. Modafad represents creation and contemporary multidisciplinary freedom.

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Sâlmon dance festival

Where: Mercat de les Flors
When: 2019 dates TBA
Tel & Website: 93 256 26 00 / http://mercatflors.cat
A two-week dance festival that brings in performances around Europe, focusing on the fresh, the new and that which dares to go against the current.

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Santa Eulàlia

Where: all over Barcelona
When: Mid-February (2019 dates TBA)
Website: santaeulalia.bcn.cat
The city’s blowout winter festival is in honour of Santa Eulàlia (Laia), who met her end at the hands of the Romans after enduring terrible tortures. Barcelona’s co-patron saint, she is a special favourite of children. Her feast day kicks off with a ceremony in Plaça Sant Jaume, followed by music, traditional 'sardanes' dancing and parades, with Masses and children’s choral concerts held in the churches and cathedral. In the evening, the female giants gather in Plaça Sant Josep Oriol, then go to throw flowers on the Baixada de Santa Eulàlia before a final boogie in the Plaça Sant Jaume. The Ajuntament and the cathedral crypt (where she’s buried) are free and open to the public, as are more than 30 museums. The festival closes on Sunday evening with 'correfocs' (for adults and children) centred around the cathedral.

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Mobile World Congress

Where: Fira Gran Via de Barcelona
When: Feb 25-28, 2019
Website: www.mobileworldcongress.com
Barcelona plays host to the annual international mobile phone and technology congress, bringing in tens of thousands of attendees, not to mention those involved in hosting, entertaining, and playing tour guide. If you want to sleep anywhere with a roof and four walls when the MWC is on, book your lodging well in advance.

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Barcelona Visual Sound

Where: various venues
When: 2019 dates TBA
Website: joves.bcn.cat/visualsound/
A ten-day showcase for untried film talent covering shorts, documentaries, animation and web design.

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Carnaval (Carnival)

Where: all over Barcelona
When: Feb 28 – Mar 6, 2019 
Website: www.barcelonaturisme.com
The city drops everything for this last big hurrah of overeating, overdrinking and underdressing prior to Lent. The celebrations begin on 'Dijous Gras' (Mardi Gras) with the appearance of potbellied King Carnestoltes – the masked personification of the carnival spirit – followed by the grand weekend parade, masked balls, 'fartaneres' (neighbourhood feasts, typically with lots of pork), food fights and a giant 'botifarrada' (sausage barbecue) on La Rambla, with most of the kids and market traders in fancy dress.

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Sitges Barcelona Car Rally

Where: Sitges & Barcelona
When: Mar 16-18, 2019
Website: www.visitsitges.com
The cars in this rally are all privately owned and all made before 1923. Cars are on display before the race starts, and winners are judged not only on their car's performance, but theirs as well: they have to dress up in period costumes.

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