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Lucie Colonnade Hotel
Photograph: Conor Doherty

The 21 best new restaurants in Boston

Keep up with Boston's restaurant scene and get out to the latest and greatest spots around town.

Olivia Vanni
Written by
Olivia Vanni
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As you look around Boston's restaurant scene these days, you'll find that there are quite a few new faces that have joined the party since the pandemic. While we all ease back into our normal lives, returning to our city's best restaurants and phenomenal bars, we've got a slew of eateries that have recently opened and that definitely deserve a spot in the regular dining rotation. So as you plan for all of your upcoming meals out, be sure to consider these outstanding culinary newcomers while still supporting your usual go-tos. 

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Boston's best restaurants for outdoor dining

29,000 square feet of fine food and drinks

  • Restaurants
  • Fenway/Kenmore

Time Out Market Boston features a tasty assortment of curated food offerings, plus two slick bars and lots more. There's plenty of seating—both indoors and outside on a newly expanded, 6,000 sq ft patio—and some of the biggest culinary names in Boston are on hand crafting a varied assortment of delicious dishes and 'Gram-worthy bites. The market is housed in the 401 Park Drive building, an Art Deco masterpiece built in 1929 as a Sears, Roebuck and Company warehouse.

Best new restaurants in Boston

  • Restaurants
  • Seaport District

Feeling like flirting with some Basque flavors? Then make the trek over to Coquette. Situated within the new Omni Hotel in the Seaport, this swanky eatery draws culinary inspiration from the French and Spanish cultures that occupy the Basque region. Menu highlights here include: snacks like whipped duck confit and piquillo pepper jelly on toasted baguette; small plates like Iberico pork collar with speckled cheese grits, green olive chermoula, chorizo agridulce, idiazabal cheese and crushed almonds; flatbreads topped with delicacies like Bayonne ham and Pyrenees mushrooms; meat- and fish-centric “feasts” like a 12-ounce tuna au poivre with madagascar green peppercorn sauce and miel de caña. The chic space features Rococo-esque frescos and modern masterpieces from local favorite Blind Fox Art—an ideal setting for casually sipping a house martini shaken with herbes de provence.

  • Restaurants
  • Central Sq

As if Central Square couldn’t get any more hip, along comes Blue Owl and its casually cool rooftop perched atop 907 Main. Overlooking the colorful streets of Cambridge, this chic and sleek spot is coming to us from executive chef Justin Urso. The menu is broken down into an array of alliterative categories—snacks, small plates, skewers, sandwiches and sweets—and features street food favorites from around the world. Savory standouts include a Jamaican oxtail beef patty served with Caribbean slaw and pickapeppa aioli, a podrao Brazilian-style hot dog and lamb kofte kebab. Beverage head Molli Rohland leads the bar program in offering impeccably crafted signature and seasonal cocktails—including drinks cleverly named to reference popular TV shows (i.e. For British Eyes Only and How The Turn Tables).

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  • Restaurants
  • Kendall Sq

Just when we thought Cambridge’s food scene couldn’t get any cooler, along comes Cloud & Spirits. Conveniently located right between Central and Kendall, this new eatery is giving us New American fare prepared with a serious Korean-inspired spin. Its menu is strictly seasonal, so you can expect occasional changes amongst the dishes offered, but current highlights include: steak tartare with pear, sesame, gochujang and brown rice chips; spaghetti with kimchi butter and parm; and a 10-oz Wagyu ribeye steak for two that comes with banchan (you know, those tiny, delicious side dishes that pretty much make every Korean meal). Alongside dinner, patrons can peruse a cocktail list that includes soju-forward libations, like the bar’s Vineyard Seoul or 7-9-5, as well as a selection of local craft beers and highly curated wines.

  • Restaurants
  • Somerville

Give your regards to Broadway...in Somerville, where you’ll find the latest place for dinner and a show. Premiere on Broadway is part restaurant, part music venue, offering Italian-inspired eats and live entertainment right in the heart of Magoun Square. Eataly alum Dan Bazzinotti is behind the menu, which is meant to feature some fresh takes on your nonna’s classics, while also making deliciously authentic ingredients more approachable. Highlights include Sicilian “dirty rice” arancini, Calabrian street corn, house-made sausage and salumi, fresh potato gnocchi that offers the option to add beef hearts, as well as an entire section dedicated to mozzarella dressed with assorted toppings (we’ll take the one with lobster, please). With a full schedule of musical performances, you can stick around and dance off the calories you just ingested—maybe even making room for more.

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  • Restaurants
  • American
  • South End

This Colonnade newcomer is back on the Back Bay scene, after the pandemic forced it to close its doors just months after opening the first time around. Now, the neighborhood spot is making a more permanent splash with breakfast and dinner (and weekend brunch starting September 18), featuring traditional culinary creations—with a twist—from Nick Calias. Alongside a number of menu nods to its predecessor, Brasserie Jo, Lucie’s kitchen is all about sophisticated yet still homey dishes, like chicken milanese with peppadew peppers, arugula and preserved lemon vinaigrette, roasted mushroom pizza with pecorino and thyme, and mussels marinière with white wine, garlic, shallots and fries. It’s the perfect place to pop in for a casual catchup over expertly executed classic cocktails (think a Negroni or French 75).

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  • South Boston

The South has come to Southie, thanks to the neighborhood's latest eatery, Hunter’s. As the newest venture from Broadway Restaurant Group’s family of South Boston spots, Hunter’s Kitchen + Bar joins its siblings Lincoln, Loco, Capo and Fat Baby. The wood-paneled space stays true to its name; there's hunting lodge decor galore, including toile wallpaper, buffalo plaid curtains, majestic portraits of bird dogs and a ton of forest green touches. (We can see it serving as a cozy little oasis where resident yuppies can curl up once those cold New England temperatures inevitably come our way). Amongst the Southern-inspired dishes coming out of the kitchen: Crispy pieces of fried chicken served atop cheddar waffles and drizzled with a generous drip of habanero lavender honey; succulent brisket and biscuit sliders smothered in bourbon barbecue sauce; shrimp and smoky grits finished with chili de arbol butter; as well as a rotating seasonal pie (i.e. a peanut butter banana pie). Pair all of that down-home fare with a craft cocktail from its whisky-heavy list of libations and you’ll be ready to camo up and chase that buck fever feeling.

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  • Restaurants
  • Back Bay

Brought to us by Chris Himmel and Chef Robert Sisca, The Banks Fish House draws inspiration from their many joint fishing trips over the years. Situated on Stuart Street on Back Bay, this restaurant is committed to breathing new life into beloved local classics that can sometimes seem tired and overdone. Amongst its elevated menu items: fish and chips (IPA-battered, locally caught haddock with slaw, french fries and remoulade), ​​the lobster bake (a single-pot medley of chorizo, lobster, clams, mussels, potatoes and corn) and a clam chowder flatbread (a thin crust topped with creme fraiche, smoked bacon, clams, potatoes and oyster crackers). With two floors filled with light, bright and tastefully modern nautical decor, there's plenty of space to sit down for a full meal, or to grab a cocktail and chilled items from the raw bar.

  • Restaurants
  • Beacon Hill

If we had a dollar for every time we wished that there were a restaurant solely dedicated to charcuterie, we would take them and spend them all at Kured. This Beacon Hill spot, which opened its doors on Charles Street earlier this summer, specializes in locally sourced cured meats, artisanal cheeses and traditional accompaniments, like house-made pickles. Kured is kind of like Sweetgreen—only it lets guests come in and customize their own charcuterie cones and boxes instead of silly salads. Folks who are too indecisive to choose their own snacking adventures fear not; this place also sells a selection of pre-curated offerings.

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  • Restaurants
  • Back Bay

Located atop The Newbury Boston, this elegant eatery serves more than just comforting Northern Italian fare—it also serves looks in a major way. The inside of this glass-enclosed, rooftop sanctuary seems like it’s a lush garden patio situated on a Tuscan hillside. But if you’re able to pry your eyes away from the beautiful interior for a minute, you’ll also see that this restaurant offers unreal views of the surrounding Back Bay. Take a seat on one of Contessa’s plush chairs, order yourself a selection of salumi and a plate of fresh pasta, and raise your negroni to the cityscape before you. 

  • Restaurants
  • Back Bay

Be prepared to totally veg out at this plant-based pizzeria and wine bar, which just opened its latest location on Newbury Street. The celebrated, NYC-based vegan spot—which is brought to us by celebrity chef and wellness guru Matthew Kenney—wows guests with delicious specialty pizzas and Italian plates that are so good, they don’t even miss meat, cheese and any other animal products. Wash down those wood-fired pies, which can also be made using a gluten-free dough, with a glass of natural wine, and you’ll be in sustainable, health-conscious heaven.

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  • Restaurants
  • Seaport District

If you’re searching for some prime South Indian street food, look no further than the Seaport and its newly opened Madras Dosa Company. This fast casual concept, which comes to us from the same folks behind restaurants Godavari and Khiladi NYC, is (not surprisingly) focused on the delicious and delicate dosa. This spot offers more than 30 variations of these thin, crepe-like lentil and rice pancakes, which are stuffed with everything from savory green chilis or Lays potato chips, to sweet mangoes or Nutella. Do up your dosa outing and add some other favorite Indian snacks, like chaat, and maybe a spicy masala chai to the mix.

  • Restaurants

Lydia Reichert and the team behind suburban hotspot Sycamore have opened another Newton eatery: a sophisticated pizza place that pays homage to her “larger than life” grandmother named, you guessed it, Jinny. This Centre Street joint forms its pies from slow-fermented dough before cooking them in a 700-degree, wood fired oven to achieve a crispy crust that still has a good chew. While the pizza is obviously the main event here, its menu also includes a bunch of Sicilian-influenced bites, including caponata, fava bean dip and marinated squid salad. 

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  • Seaport District

A piece of the Grey Lady has found its way to the mainland. Nantucket favorite Nautilus has expanded its island operation and has settled in the Seaport, bringing Boston its Asian- and Latin-inspired eats full of fresh seafood. Don’t be fooled by its chill branding and laidback lingo, this restaurant means business when it comes to its selection of small plates, shareable entrees and “table feasts.” (A whole roasted peking duck stuffed into steamed buns? Yes, please). Going above and beyond the typical wine list, this spot earns extra kudos for its impressive sake selection. 

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There's a new addition to the MIDA family, with chef-owner Douglass Williams just opening the doors to his Newton location. Both the original South End eatery and its surburban sister draw heavy influences from Italian cuisine, with mutual menu items like gnocchi cacio e pepe, paccheri bolognese and fried eggplant parmesan. However, the latest space sets itself apart from the Boston branch, thanks to its selection of traditional pizzas. Like its sibling, the wine list here tends to favor Northern Italian and French bottles, with an emphasis on lesser known producers. And, of course, it expertly executes classic Italian cocktails, like the Negroni. 

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Fiya Chicken is setting Allston ablaze with its korean fried fare. The Packard’s Corner kitchen makes fried chicken so nice because it fries these pieces of poultry twice. Whether it’s the wings, tenders or its sandwich, this place’s chicken is crispy, juicy and downright delicious. Breaded bird aside, Fiya’s hyper-focused menu also features one other must-eat item: its pancake batter-dipped corn dog, a crispy yet fluffy piece of fried art that can come with or without cheese.

  • Restaurants
  • Allston/Brighton

Also making its Allston arrival: Turkish Lazuri Café, which serves American breakfast as well as truly traditional Mediterranean meals. While we’d highly recommend making your way there for marvelous meze, kabobs and pitas, we’re especially stoked about its selection of Turkish pizza—of both the lahmacun and pide varieties. Pro-offal patrons will also find a beyond tasty tripe soup that’s full of nutrition and flavor that we consider the mark of an unapologetically authentic eatery—and we stan.

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  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • price 1 of 4

If you're all about slurping up big bowls of brothy noodles, then Zuru Zuru Ramen and Donburi is the place to be. This Malden spot offers slowly simmered soups with a variety of spice levels and toppings, including caramelized pork belly cha-su, a medley of mushrooms and fried chicken. Folks looking for a less liquid-forward meal can also snag a donburi rice bowl featuring an equally appealing selection of proteins from this gluten-conscious kitchen.

  • Restaurants
  • Allston/Brighton

Hot chicken is so hot right now—and that includes Allston’s latest addition to the spicy poultry scene: Underdog Hot Chicken. The Brighton Ave. operation serves this fried Nashville delicacy at five different heat levels, so every guest can feel the right amount of burn while chowing down on its tenders, wings, drumsticks and sandwiches. Southern sides include mac and cheese, fried pickles and kaleslaw (you know, to keep it healthy).

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  • Restaurants
  • French
  • South End
  • price 3 of 4

The South End mourned the loss of Gaslight last fall—but not for long, thanks to Brasserie. Replacing the former restaurant at its 560 Harrison Ave. space, Brasserie boasts the same French flair as its predecessor. The menu is still full of francophile favorites, like escargots à la bourguignonne and duck à l’orange, as well as ingredients sourced from our very own New England waters, as demonstrated in dishes like its bouillabaisse and roasted wild striped bass. Stop by the custom zinc bar for a simple glass of wine, or slide into one of the studded leather booths for a full-on meal à la carte.

  • Restaurants
  • Allston/Brighton

Poke Boys has brought #bowlgoals to the Hong Kong Supermarket/Super 88 Food Court in Allston. As the name of the new stall implies, it specializes in poke, the traditional Hawaiian dish that’s quickly become all the rage in recent years. Guests can order their own custom creations or opt for one of the pre-curated combinations, like the salmon lover or yuzu albacore bowls. For folks who aren’t fans of raw fish, the menu also features a number of choices that include cooked proteins, such as grilled eel, soft tofu, chicken and shrimp. 

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This modern eatery’s name is a throwback to the 1700s, when the old Punch Bowl Tavern was the place to be. While the name may be a nod to the Brookline of yore, the new restaurant is anything but dated—from its contemporary menu right down to its minimalist decor. The kitchen leans heavily on local ingredients to prepare its selection of elevated New England cuisine, including: fried Ipswich clams with togarashi, Kewpie mayo and scallions; a flatbread topped with farmer’s market veggies; and Maine blueberry cobbler with pink peppercorn ice cream.

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